Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, March 15th, 2014

Those who can't do, teach. And those who can't teach, teach gym.

Woody Allen


South North
Neither ♠ A Q J 3
 Q J 5 4
 9 6 2
♣ J 3
West East
♠ 9 8 5
 K 6
 A 4
♣ A 10 8 7 6 2
♠ 10 4 2
 9 7
 Q J 10 8 3
♣ Q 9 4
South
♠ K 7 6
 A 10 8 3 2
 K 7 5
♣ K 5
South West North East
1 2♣ 3 Pass
4 All pass    

A

It is a foul libel, put out by the players, that the only people who direct tournaments are those who are not good enough to play in them. One example of a director who is an expert player is Olin Hubert, the hero of today's deal.

Olin is old enough to have been playing in an era when his partner’s bid of three hearts showed a good hand, not a pre-emptive raise. Against four hearts, West led the diamond ace and continued the suit. Olin won in hand and crossed to the spade jack to run the heart queen.

When West won and returned a spade, Olin had four possible lines of play. He could run the hearts, then the spades, pitching a diamond, or he could pitch a club on the last one. Equally, he could run spades, pitching a diamond, then take the hearts, or he could pitch a club on the spades before taking the hearts. What looks best to you?

Olin correctly drew two only rounds of trumps, then cashed the remaining spades, discarding a club from hand. His plan was to find East with the club queen in addition to his original holding of five diamonds.

Now, on the run of the trumps, East needed to retain the diamond jack, so had to bare his club queen. Olin led the club king from hand at trick 12 to smother the queen, and West had to bring the entryless dummy back to life at trick 13. Contract made!


You have a number of palatable choices, namely raising spades, repeating clubs, or bidding one no-trump. With only one diamond stopper, bidding no-trump feels wrong. Raising spades with three small cards is also not ideal, and the simple rebid in my own suit is not attractive with such weak clubs. I'll bid two spades.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 9 8 5
 K 6
 A 4
♣ A 10 8 7 6 2
South West North East
1♣ 1 1♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, March 14th, 2014

He has no hope who never had a fear.

Thomas Cowper


South North
Neither ♠ 10 8 3
 A 4
 K Q J 7 2
♣ K J 6
West East
♠ K 5 4 2
 9 8 3 2
 10 6
♣ A 8 4
♠ J 7 6
 J 6
 A 9 8 5 4
♣ Q 9 3
South
♠ A Q 9
 K Q 10 7 5
 3
♣ 10 7 5 2
South West North East
1 Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♠2

Today's deal features some excellent defense. The final deceptive play that put declarer off track is one that crops up quite frequently.

South opened the bidding light, then was forced to make an inelegant rebid at no-trump. North no doubt thought that he had his partner covered anyway. West led the spade two against three no-trump, and East’s jack forced declarer’s queen. Declarer played a diamond to the king and East’s ace, and East returned the spade seven to the nine and king. West now imaginatively switched to the club four, East winning the queen and reverting to spades. The defenders had now set up their five defensive tricks, but because the heart jack was dropping, it looked as if declarer would arrive at his nine tricks first.

However, on winning the spade ace, declarer played a heart to dummy’s ace, on which East dropped the jack. This stopped declarer in his tracks and, taking the card at face value, South deduced that if he continued with hearts, he would make only eight tricks.

As West had failed to clear the spades at trick four, it seemed logical that it was East who held the club ace, in which case all declarer had to do was play a club. So that was what he did, but looked rather foolish when West won the ace and cashed his long spade.

East did well to deflect declarer by playing the heart jack, but in truth it was the type of cost-nothing play that we should all look out for.


The "impossible" two-spade call shows a good club raise, better than a direct raise to three clubs. With a minimum hand in terms of shape and high cards, you should simply revert to three clubs and let partner bid on if he still has unexpected extras.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 9
 K Q 10 7 5
 3
♣ 10 7 5 2
South West North East
1 Pass 1 NT Pass
2♣ Pass 2♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, March 13th, 2014

I love fools' experiments. I am always making them.

Charles Darwin


South North
East-West ♠ 8 7 6 3
 K Q 9 5
 3
♣ K 7 6 4
West East
♠ K Q J 10 9
 2
 10 9 8 6 2
♣ Q 5
♠ 2
 7 3
 Q J 7 5 4
♣ J 10 9 8 2
South
♠ A 5 4
 A J 10 8 6 4
 A K
♣ A 3
South West North East
1 1♠ 4 Pass
6 All pass    

♠K

After going down in his slam on this deal from the Dyspeptics Club, South claimed that he had given the contract his best shot. As usual, North took great pleasure in undeceiving him.

In his slam of six hearts, South had received a top-spade lead and had correctly decided that he couldn’t afford to duck the first spade to correct the timing, since an immediate ruff would have sunk the contract. There were only 11 top winners, and in the forlorn hope that “something might turn up,” he reeled off his trumps. The defenders had no real problems with their discards and eventually came to their two tricks.

While South’s idea about winning the first trick was sound enough, there was a perfectly reasonable (and successful) alternative line of play. The fact that spades were 5-1 should have been to declarer’s advantage. If East indeed has the expected spade singleton, all that South needs to do is to find him with at least four clubs.

After drawing trump in two rounds, declarer cashes his two top diamonds and follows with the ace, king, and a club ruff — exposing the position in the suit. He then crosses to one of dummy’s remaining two trumps and leads the last club, on which he discards a spade.

This leaves East on lead with only minor-suit cards, and he is forced to concede a ruff and discard, allowing South’s last spade to go away.


Do not get carried away by the four trumps and singleton. You have no high cards in partner's suits and soft cards in his likely shortages. A raise to two spades is certainly not an underbid, though you can hardly do less, but I would make the same call if the spade eight were the queen.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 7 6 3
 K Q 9 5
 3
♣ K 7 6 4
South West North East
Pass 1 Pass
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Luck has a way of evaporating when you lean on it.

Brandon Mull


East North
Both ♠ A Q J
 Q J
 Q J 7 6 3
♣ 6 4 3
West East
♠ 8 6 2
 7 5 3
 K 9 4
♣ 10 9 8 7
♠ K 10 4 3
 8 6 4 2
 10 8 5
♣ 5 2
South
♠ 9 7 5
 A K 10 9
 A 2
♣ A K Q J
South West North East
Pass
2 NT Pass 6 NT All pass

♣10

Against today's slam, with little to go on, West did not find the killing spade lead, but declarer failed to exploit his good fortune.

Declarer won the lead of the club 10 in hand and decided to play on diamonds. He cashed the ace and followed with the two to dummy’s queen, which was allowed to hold. West had intelligently followed with the nine, then the four, to try to create the impression of a bad break in the suit, while East had contributed the five then the 10.

Now South had to decide whether to play for an even break in diamonds or to rely on the spade finesse. Eventually he came to hand and finessed in spades. This line would have succeeded had the diamonds been 4-2 with West having the length, since East would not have had a diamond to lead. Even as it was, East had to play a diamond on winning the spade king. But he did so, and the defense took their two tricks.

Undoubtedly, though, the best line is to lead a low diamond from hand at trick two, not the ace. If West wins with the king, there is no need for a spade finesse. If East wins with the king, he cannot put you to an immediate guess, and there is time to test the diamonds for an even break before falling back on the spades. Finally, if the diamond queen is allowed to win, playing on spades guarantees 12 tricks.


The likely final contract rates to be three no-trump or four spades. (Slam is almost out of the picture once partner cannot do more at his second turn.) But there is no need to rush — cue-bid three diamonds, planning to bid no-trump at your next turn and let partner have a say in the final contract.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 9 7 5
 A K 10 9
 A 2
♣ A K Q J
South West North East
2 Pass Pass
Dbl. Pass 2♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

In baiting a mousetrap with cheese, always leave room for the mouse.

Saki (H.H. Munro)


North North
Both ♠ A 9 4 2
 A Q 7 6
 K 6 2
♣ A 3
West East
♠ 8 7
 9 2
 Q 7 5 4
♣ K Q J 6 2
♠ 6 5 3
 10 8 4
 10 9 3
♣ 10 9 8 5
South
♠ K Q J 10
 K J 5 3
 A J 8
♣ 7 4
South West North East
1 Pass
1 Pass 3 Pass
4 NT Pass 5♣ Pass
5 Pass 6 Pass
6 All pass    

♣K

Not all balanced hands in the 15-17 range need to be opened one no-trump. In today's deal, North, playing with an expert partner, elected to upgrade his hand because of his major-suit lengths and the fact that he had a pure jack-less 17-count. He also realized that it would do no harm to make his partner declarer in any major-suit contract.

Things worked out exactly as he had hoped for. South drove to slam, first asking for keycards, then for the trump queen, and North’s response showed it, together with the diamond king.

South received a top-club lead against his six-heart slam, which he won in dummy. When trumps broke 3-2, South drew them all, cashed off four rounds of spades, and exited with the losing club to compel the defenders to shift to diamonds.

Had West won the second club trick, the hand would have been over; but it was East who took the trick. That player did the best he could when he shifted to a low diamond. South appreciated that he could delay the finesse against the diamond queen for one round. He carefully inserted the eight, and when that forced the queen, declarer could claim the balance of the tricks. Had West been able to follow with the nine or 10, declarer would have won the trick in dummy and taken the diamond finesse on the next round of the suit.


Opinions are sharply divided on whether it works out best in the long run to escape from one no-trump doubled or to sit it out and hope partner can defeat it. My view is that if vulnerable, I sit for it; and if nonvulnerable, I run. A separate issue is whether to play that one should bid naturally here or use Stayman and transfers. Both approaches are reasonable.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 6 5 3
 10 8 4
 10 9 3
♣ 10 9 8 5
South West North East
1 NT Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, March 10th, 2014

There is no royal road to geometry.

Euclid


South North
Both ♠ K Q 7
 Q 7 4
 Q 10 4 3
♣ A J 6
West East
♠ J 10 9 4 3
 8 5
 2
♣ Q 9 7 5 3
♠ 5 2
 6 3 2
 J 8 6 5
♣ K 10 8 2
South
♠ A 8 6
 A K J 10 9
 A K 9 7
♣ 4
South West North East
2♣ Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
4 Pass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 5 NT Pass
6 Pass 7 All pass

♠J

There are some people for whom the word “counting” at bridge has the same effect as the sight of a spider. They throw up their arms and run screaming from the room. I exaggerate a little, I confess, but you get the picture. One cannot hope to become proficient at bridge without a modicum of hard work. And one of the most challenging aspects of the game is the need to count every single hand (unless you are dummy — and even then…).

Today’s deal is a fine example of a hand where your first reaction as declarer is that you can claim your grand slam, but if that were the case, I would not have given it to you as a problem, would I?

You win the spade lead and draw trump in three rounds, discovering that East has the length — the first clue but only a small one — as West discards a club. Then you play a club to the ace and trump a club, lead a spade to the king and trump another club, finally cashing the spade ace and leading to the spade queen, on which East discards a club. Bingo!

If you go back and do the arithmetic, you will see that West has followed to three clubs and discarded one, and thus started with five spades and two hearts. He cannot have four diamonds, so cash the diamond ace and lead to the queen, prepared to finesse against East if necessary. And today it is necessary.


Dummy rates to have a near Yarborough and you have no stand-out lead, so you may have to decide if your personal philosophy argues for aggression or passivity. At one end of the spectrum is the club lead; I'll vote against that on the grounds that the risk of surrendering a trick unnecessarily is too high. At the other end is the choice of majors; I have a slight preference for hearts over spades.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 7 4
 J 4 3
 A J 4
♣ K J 7 2
South West North East
2 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, March 9th, 2014

Last week I held ♠ 5-4-3,  10-7-6-5-4-3,  J-9-3-2, ♣ —. My partner opened two no-trump, and I transferred to hearts, then guessed to pass the response of three hearts. My partner had four trumps and no wasted values in clubs, so we finished up with an embarrassing 12 tricks. Who was unreasonably pessimistic here?

Missed the Boat, Trenton, N.J.

With a six-card suit, it is by no means clear to bid game, but the void would make me do it. I wonder, though, could your partner have jumped to game over the transfer? Normally one does so with four trumps, unless the hand has exceptionally sterile shape in the side-suits or is low in controls.

In second seat I was dealt ♠ J-10-3,  Q-5,  A-Q-9-5, ♣ A-K-Q-3. Before I could open the bidding I heard my RHO produce a weak two-spade bid. We were at unfavorable vulnerability and I had no idea what to bid. What would your thoughts be?

Eager for Action, Galveston, Texas

You may not overcall in a minor with only four pieces, so what does that leave? Doubling works out fine if partner passes or bids a minor. However, if he bids hearts, you may regret having acted. Since a two-no-trump call shows 15-18 and a spade stopper, you are not lying by that much if you make that call — are you? Given that East is relatively unlikely to have solid spades at this vulnerability, I'd definitely opt for that route.

I enjoy your bridge problems regularly run in the local paper, but I don't get the paper that often. Is there a book out that has a bunch of these little nuggets all bound together? Where might I get it?

Bookworm, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Are you an internet person? Try bridgeblogging.com. The column is posted 15 days after publication there. One of these days I will get around to publishing the columns in book form, I suppose.

Last night I opened one no-trump in second seat with ♠ 9-7-3,  A-K-Q-10,  6-5, ♣ A-Q-7-4 and found myself defending four spades doubled, which we could not beat. Was my initial action wrong, with two open suits?

Robbing Peter, Janesville, Wis.

You may not like the results springing from your initial action, but what are the choices here? If you open one club, you'd have no rebid over a one-spade response. You could try an enterprising one-heart opening (promising five) and plan to rebid two clubs, I suppose. But it looks simplest and best to open one no-trump and hope partner doesn't drive to game with two small diamonds. If you could make partner declare no-trump, that might be best; but you play them better than he does!

I faced a conundrum when my partner opened one heart and jumped to three hearts over my two-club response. (I held ♠ Q-5,  J-3,  Q-6-5, ♣ A-K-Q-J-7-4. I guessed to use Blackwood and drove to slam over the response that showed three key cards. Alas, the defenders found the diamond lead away from the king, allowing them to cash the first two tricks. My partner had seven solid hearts and jack-fourth of diamonds along with the spade ace. What should we have done?

Shooting the Moon, Bellingham, Wash.

Don't use Blackwood when you do not know what to do over the response. It is ill-advised to use Blackwood with weak holdings in an unbid suit since, if you are missing a keycard, you will have no idea whether the slam is making, or missing the first two tricks. On the auction you had, you are clearly close to slam in terms of high-card points, but if three hearts sets trump, then maybe a cue-bid of four clubs is right. Partner will presumably bid four spades, and then you will sign off in five hearts.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, March 8th, 2014

One hope is too like despair
For prudence to smother.

Percy Bysshe Shelley


East North
Neither ♠ 10 9 5
 A K 6
 4 2
♣ A Q 9 5 2
West East
♠ 8 7 2
 J 8 5 4 3
 8 5
♣ 10 7 4
♠ A J 6 4 3
 Q
 A J 9 7
♣ J 6 3
South
♠ K Q
 10 9 7 2
 K Q 10 6 3
♣ K 8
South West North East
1♠
Dbl. Pass 2♠ Pass
3 Pass 4 All pass

♠2

At three of the four tables in a local league event, North became declarer in three no-trump. With a 3-3 club break and East holding a singleton heart honor, this contract is makeable, but no declarer succeeded. The unsuccessful declarers won the spade lead in dummy, crossed to the heart ace and played a diamond. Had South's diamonds been solid, this line would make sense because spades might have been blocked (with West holding jack-third of spades), but here there is no guarantee that playing a diamond would make the contract. Taking a second-round heart finesse and then playing on clubs was the indicated line, perhaps.

At the fourth table South became declarer in four hearts after the murky sequence set out here. West led a spade to East’s ace, and a spade was returned. Declarer now played two rounds of clubs ending in dummy and then a diamond. East made his side’s only defensive error when he rose with the ace and played the spade jack, ruffed by declarer. Declarer now took two top diamonds, the second of which was ruffed by West with the eight and overruffed with the king. A third round of clubs was cashed and a fourth played, which East ruffed with the heart queen. Remarkably, this was the defense’s only trump trick! All declarer had left was 10-9-7 of trumps while dummy had the A-6 of trumps and a diamond. Whichever black suit East played, declarer had to make the rest of the tricks.


Every partnership playing negative doubles should have a firm agreement that when relatively short in the opponents' suit, one is obligated to reopen with a double — unless the opponents' tempo has made it clear that it is their hand, not yours. On this auction, partner is surely a favorite to hold a penalty double of diamonds, isn't he? So double now.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 9 5
 A K 6
 4 2
♣ A Q 9 5 2
South West North East
Pass
1♣ 1 Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, March 7th, 2014

Awaiting the sensation of a short, sharp shock,
From a cheap and chippy chopper on a big black block.

William S. Gilbert


West North
Both ♠ A Q 3
 K 7 6
 K 2
♣ 10 9 8 5 3
West East
♠ 10 8 5
 10 8 4
 Q J 8 6 3
♣ Q 6
♠ K J 9 4
 J 9 5 2
 A 10
♣ J 7 2
South
♠ 7 6 2
 A Q 3
 9 7 5 4
♣ A K 4
South West North East
Pass 1♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

Q

At teams one of my least favorite contracts is two no-trump. The chances of making precisely eight tricks are remote, and even if three no-trump is a poor contract, it may make after a poor opening lead or a misdefense.

Here was a good example of how the smallest of differences in spot cards can make game playable. In this case the key card was the diamond nine, when West started with the diamond queen against three no-trump. East took dummy’s king with the ace and continued with the diamond 10, which held the trick. He then switched to the heart two; take over from here.

It looks obvious that West started out with Q-J-8-x-x in diamonds and that the defenders cannot unscramble their five tricks. If you can score five club tricks you may make your contract without a finesse. But can you see any extra chances?

Best is to win the heart switch and cash the club ace and king. Here West’s queen comes down, leaving a defender with the master club — and you hope that it is East. Since that player’s switch to the heart two looks most consistent with a four-card suit, you cash your other top hearts before exiting with a club. East can cash just one more heart trick before having to lead a spade into dummy’s tenace, giving you a second trick in that suit.


Having shown a limit raise via the forcing no-trump, you should be delighted to cooperate with any slam venture that partner might have in mind. Bid four diamonds as a cue-bid for spades, and be prepared to take another forward-going bid, if offered the chance.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 3
 Q 7 6
 K 2
♣ 10 9 8 5 3
South West North East
1♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
3♠ Pass 4♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, March 6th, 2014

Great things are done when men and mountains meet;
This is not done by jostling in the street.

William Blake


South North
East-West ♠ Q 10 9 4
 7 3 2
 K 7 3
♣ 10 7 3
West East
♠ 7 6
 6
 Q J 10 6 4
♣ J 8 6 5 2
♠ K 8 3 2
 8 5
 A 9 8 2
♣ K 9 4
South
♠ A J 5
 A K Q J 10 9 4
 5
♣ A Q
South West North East
2♣ Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
3♠ Pass 4 Pass
6 All pass    

Q

In today's deal it is unclear what North's correct call should be at his second turn, after his partner shows a strong hand with hearts. A jump to four hearts would be hugely premature, so maybe North should bid a natural two no-trump, then follow up with four hearts. South clearly expected a little more in the way of shape for the raise in hearts, but then again, had North's king been in any of the side-suits, slam would have been very playable. As it was, after the lead of the diamond queen against six hearts, the slam looked virtually hopeless. Not only would declarer need a very favorable lie of the black suits, but he would also need to handle his entries very carefully.

For want of anything better to do, declarer ducked in dummy at trick one. West held the trick and continued diamonds, letting South ruff high. He followed up with the heart ace and king, then carefully led his heart four to dummy’s seven.

Now declarer needed to take two spade finesses and remain in dummy to play clubs. South was up to the task: he led the spade queen, and when East defended well by ducking,.declarer unblocked the spade jack from his hand, and the spade 10 held the next trick, leaving South in dummy. When the club finesse succeeded, declarer had his 12 tricks. Yes this was lucky, but to a certain extent South had made his own luck.


Here, your partner's jump to four clubs suggests big spade support, with 6-4 pattern, game-forcing values and good clubs. You have no interest in higher things, so sign off in four spades and hope you can make it. For the record, with the spade four to the ace, you would have enough to cue-bid four diamonds now, since your partner has shown a really good hand.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 10 9 4
 7 3 2
 K 7 3
♣ 10 7 3
South West North East
1♣ Pass
1♠ Pass 4♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.