Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, January 25th, 2014

The strongest and sweetest songs yet remain to be sung.

Walt Whitman


East North
North-South ♠ Q J 6 4
 Q 8 7 6
 Q 6 4
♣ 9 2
West East
♠ 8 5 3
 K 4 2
 10 3
♣ 8 7 6 5 4
♠ 10 7
 A J 3
 K 9 8 2
♣ Q J 10 3
South
♠ A K 9 2
 10 9 5
 A J 7 5
♣ A K
South West North East
1
Dbl. Pass 1 Pass
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♣8

In 1974, BOLS Royal Distilleries, a Dutch company, first sponsored a competition in which the world's best players were asked to write articles promoting their favorite bridge tips. Inevitably, the first crop of tips was the best, and one of the best of those was called "The Intrafinesse," submitted by the Brazilian superstar, Gabriel Chagas.

Today’s deal is an extremely challenging example of the theme. North-South had done well to avoid four spades, which would have had to go down when East turns up with the heart jack, and there is a virtually inevitable diamond loser.

Against three no-trump West found the best lead of a club. In practice declarer broached diamonds by running dummy’s queen (hoping for West to have a singleton honor or two honors doubleton), but still could manage only two diamond tricks, bringing his total to eight.

Declarer could have succeeded if he had relied on an intrafinesse, which involves first finessing against a significant missing card, then pinning it on the next round. He should start with a diamond to dummy’s six, which would have lost to East’s eight. On the next round of the suit declarer leads dummy’s diamond queen covered by the king and ace, and West’s 10 falls. Now declarer’s J-7 are poised over East’s 9-2, Declarer cashes his spades ending in dummy, then plays a diamond to his seven, thus making the three diamond tricks he needed for his contract. This line works against a doubleton eight, nine or 10 in West.


You should respond two spades rather than two hearts because your plan is to compete to three hearts if East backs in with three diamonds. If you bid two hearts after North doubles, you will be unable to offer partner the choice of majors at the three-level.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q J 6 4
 Q 8 7 6
 Q 6 4
♣ 9 2
South West North East
Pass 2 Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, January 24th, 2014

Journalists say a thing that they know isn't true, in the hope that if they keep on saying it long enough, it will be true.

Arnold Bennett


South North
East-West ♠ K 10 7 3
 J 10
 A J 2
♣ J 9 4 3
West East
♠ A Q 9 8 4 2
 A 2
 Q 10 7 6
♣ A
♠ J 6 5
 6 5 4
 K 9 8 4
♣ 8 7 6
South
♠ —
 K Q 9 8 7 3
 5 3
♣ K Q 10 5 2
South West North East
1 1♠ 2 NT Pass
4 All pass    

♣A

Today's problem comes from a relatively new bridge book, Patrick Jourdain's "Problem Corner," published by Master Point Press, and is typical of the author's challenging but fair tests of your skill. The author was for many years the editor of the International Bridge Press Association, the bridge journalist's bible, since it publishes news and hands from all around the world. Bridge magazines are becoming thinner and thinner these days, but you can read a selection of scintillating deals here.

If you want to set yourself a realistic test, consider how South should play four hearts here, but first cover up the East and West cards. West, who has overcalled one spade, cashes the club ace at trick one and then switches to a low diamond. What are the dangers, and how can you short-circuit them?

The danger is that West has led a singleton club ace and is planning to win the first trump and put his partner on lead with a second diamond in order to obtain his club ruff.

The only entry to the East hand rates to be in diamonds. How can you prevent him from coming on lead? The secret is that you should win the diamond lead at once and play the spade king, discarding a diamond from hand when East is unable to cover. This elegant maneuver, aptly named the Scissors Coup, cuts the defenders’ communications.


Despite your fine intermediates, this hand does not seem worth a force to game. The choice is a raise to three clubs, an eclectic raise to three hearts, or the simple invitational call of two no-trump. This last option seems like the most flexible route to go.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 10 7 3
 J 10
 A J 2
♣ J 9 4 3
South West North East
Pass 1 Pass
1♠ Pass 2♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

The torment of precautions often exceeds the dangers to be avoided. It is sometimes better to abandon one's self to destiny.

Napoleon Bonaparte


South North
North-South ♠ J 8
 K 5
 7 6 4 2
♣ A K 6 3 2
West East
♠ 9 6 5 4
 Q J 10 3 2
 —
♣ Q J 9 5
♠ Q 10 3 2
 9 8 6
 10 9 8 5 3
♣ 8
South
♠ A K 7
 A 7 4
 A K Q J
♣ 10 7 4
South West North East
2 NT Pass 4 NT Pass
6 NT All pass    

Q

In today's deal your best slam is six diamonds, but at matchpoints it is frequently hard to locate minor suits. In six no-trump you receive the lead of the heart queen. It is worthwhile giving the right approach a fair amount of consideration; the answer might well surprise you.

Let’s look at three approaches. The fair-weather player cashes the club ace and king and tries to run the club suit for four tricks. If that line succeeds, he moves on to the next deal, oblivious to his own failings.

The more cautious player notes that if West has a singleton honor, he can cash a top card from dummy, then lead a low club toward his 10 to hold his losers in the suit to one. Nice try, but when you win the first heart with the ace and cross to a club to lead up to your hand, East would win his honor and return a heart, removing dummy’s entry to the clubs while the suit is blocked.

In summary, after the heart lead, if either defender has a singleton club honor, there is nothing that you can do, assuming best defense.

But there are precisely two singletons you can cope with — the bare club eight or nine in East. Win the heart lead and immediately advance the club 10, planning to run it if West plays low. If he covers, win and lead back to your seven, insuring four club tricks for your side.


Your hand is far too good to pass, but competing intelligently is not that easy. Doubling for takeout will persuade partner that you have hearts, while a call of three clubs takes you dangerously high without a known fit. I'd settle for an idiosyncratic raise to two spades. (Tell your partner you had a club in with your spades.)

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ J 8
 K 5
 7 6 4 2
♣ A K 6 3 2
South West North East
Pass 1 1♠ 2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

There are moments when everything goes well; don't be frightened, it won't last.

Jules Renard


South North
East-West ♠ 10 6 4
 8 7 6 4 2
 6 4 3
♣ A 5
West East
♠ K 8 3
 10 3
 K J 9 7
♣ J 10 8 4
♠ Q 9 7 2
 5
 10 8
♣ K Q 9 7 6 3
South
♠ A J 5
 A K Q J 9
 A Q 5 2
♣ 2
South West North East
2♣ Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
3♠ Pass 4♣ Pass
4 Pass 4 All pass

♣J

North-South have a great fit here, together with a lot of controls, and it is easy to imagine that they might get bid to at least the five-level. Today, though, the secret is to stop at the four-level, then to play the hand carefully to come home with even 10 tricks.

A reasonable approach in four hearts is to win the club lead and take a diamond finesse. If the defenders play a second club, then declarer will ruff, draw trump, and play the diamond ace and another diamond. When that suit fails to break, he will ruff the fourth diamond in dummy and try to play spades for one loser. If that fails, declarer will go down and will doubtless consider himself unlucky.

However, it is possible to do much better than that. In fact, on careful play the contract is 100 percent guaranteed. After the club lead, declarer must win and ruff the club five in his hand. He now makes sure of 10 tricks by drawing trump in as many rounds as required, then playing the diamond ace and another diamond. When a defender wins that, he cannot play another diamond or it will set up a trick for declarer in that suit, nor can East shift to spades effectively. If declarer ducks the trick, West can win, but will be confronted with the same dilemma, since a ruff-sluff lets declarer ruff in hand and pitch a spade loser.


A simple call of two hearts would show extras, but not a hand this good. It feels right to cue-bid two diamonds, then bid three hearts. That should be natural and forcing, and help to get you to the right major-suit strain.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A J 5
 A K Q J 9
 A Q 5 2
♣ 2
South West North East
1 Pass Pass
Dbl. Pass 1♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, January 21th, 2014

To rush would be a crime,
‘Cause nice and easy does it every time.

Marilyn & Alan Bergman and Lew Spence


South North
Both ♠ K Q 5
 A 6
 K Q J 4
♣ A 9 7 2
West East
♠ J 10 9 7 2
 5
 8 6 2
♣ J 8 4 3
♠ 6 4
 K Q 10 7 2
 9 7 5 3
♣ 10 6
South
♠ A 8 3
 J 9 8 4 3
 A 10
♣ K Q 5
South West North East
1 Pass 2♣ Pass
2 NT Pass 6 NT All pass

♠J

Instant gratification is all very well, but at the bridge table you will generally find that "Make haste slowly" is a far better approach. I have often found that a suit splitting 3-3 at the start of a deal rates to split no worse than 3-3 at the end of it. Conversely, when you delay playing on a suit, you often find out far more about the opponents' hands — and opponents occasionally discard from a critical holding before they become aware of declarer's distribution.

Let’s look at today’s contract of six no-trump. The novice will play on clubs immediately, and depending on whether he guesses the suit accurately or not, he will end up with either 11 or 12 tricks. But there is no need for making a blind guess.

When the spade jack is led against six no-trump, declarer should win the queen and lead a low heart from the board. East wins the heart king and returns a spade. After cashing the spade and diamond winners, declarer takes the heart ace, and discovers that West began with a singleton heart. , He also began with five spades and three diamonds. The count in each of these suits is absolutely guaranteed since one defender or the other has shown out on each of these suits.

At this point West is known to have four clubs, so declarer cashes the club king and queen and can then finesse with complete confidence against West’s jack.


An argument could be made for a two-no-trump opening here (partner as a passed hand is unlikely to raise you to an umakeable slam). As against that, opening one diamond and jumping to two no-trump shows the best feature of your hand. Additionally, it is far from clear that the hand will play better your way up. (Imagine partner with queen-third of either clubs or hearts in three no-trump.)

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K Q 5
 A 6
 K Q J 4
♣ A 9 7 2
South West North East
Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, January 20th, 2014

We believed we were safe. That was the big fantasy.

John Marsden


East North
East-West ♠ K Q 5 3
 A 8
 A K 8 6
♣ A Q 6
West East
♠ J 10 9 7
 10 6 3
 J 9 4 2
♣ 8 4
♠ A
 K Q J 9 5 2
 Q 10 7
♣ 9 7 2
South
♠ 8 6 4 2
 7 4
 5 3
♣ K J 10 5 3
South West North East
1
Pass Pass Dbl. Pass
1♠ Pass 3 Pass
4♠ All pass    

3

When this deal came up in a knockout match at a recent regional tournament, both tables reached the spade game despite East's opening bid. North doubled the one-heart opening bid, and at one table heard a one-spade response and simply jumped to game, while in the other room North followed the sequence shown here.

By agreement the jump to three hearts showed precisely four trumps and forcing values, and was designed to insure that North-South did not reach a 4-3 fit if South had been obliged to respond in a three-card suit.

In the first room South won the heart lead and went after trumps by leading them from the top. The 4-1 trump break left declarer with just nine tricks. Playing on clubs before trumps would have probably led to defeat as well, so South considered that he had simply been unlucky, but the declarer in the other room demonstrated that there was more to the deal than that.

Here South realized that he could afford two trump losers but not three. As he knew East would surely have the spade ace, he found the best play of a low spade from dummy at trick two. When the ace popped up, declarer had achieved his goal of holding his trump losers to two. But had the defenders won the first trump trick cheaply, declarer would have regained the lead and led out a top trump. This would have been proof against almost any lie of the cards.


It is largely a matter of partnership agreement here, but I suggest a simple agreement: double is 0-4 HCP, and pass is semipositive, forcing to game. New suits are natural and suggest a decent suit and seven or more HCP. The make-up of this hand would allow you to go either way between a double and pass, but I would opt for the more aggressive action.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 6 4 2
 7 4
 5 3
♣ K J 10 5 3
South West North East
Pass Pass 2♣ 2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, January 19th, 2014

I held ♠ Q-J-8-7,  9-4,  Q-7-6-3, ♣ A-Q-4 and passed in first chair. When my partner opened one heart, I was afraid that a one-spade response would lead to our missing game, so I tried two no-trump. That was not a success. Would a call of two spades have been better?

Young Lochinvar, Spartanburg, S.C.

Let's first discuss what a jump by a passed hand should be. I say it can't be natural and weak — you would already have opened. Nor can it show a good hand, for the same reason. The only logical reason for jumping is that you have a real fit for opener. So here a simple call of one spade is enough. Partner will always raise with four, and if he has three and a minimum, what game will you have missed?

At matchpoint pairs you hold ♠ Q-J-9-7-2,  7-4,  9-6-3, ♣ A-K-3. When your partner opens one diamond, you respond one spade, and your partner rebids three diamonds. What is your call? I knew bidding three no-trump with that heart holding was dangerous, but could not see any other way to get to the no-trump game from here.

Down the Rabbit Hole, Texarkana, Texas

My belief is that responder's jump to three diamonds should be forcing to game — unless responder passes right now. So responder can make a forcing rebid of three spades (he doesn't mind being raised with honor doubleton) and opener will bid three no-trump. Responder rates to have clubs rather than hearts controlled, or he could temporize by bidding three hearts over three diamonds at his second turn.

When should one be prepared to bid no-trump with an open suit? I had an unsuccessful experiment yesterday, holding ♠ 4,  K-7,  A-5-3, ♣ A-K-J-6-4-3-2. I opened one club, my partner responded one heart, and my RHO pre-empted to three diamonds. I guessed to rebid three no-trump, and the opponents cashed five spade tricks, while my partner turned purple.

Unprepared, Anchorage, Alaska

I wish all my partners were always brave enough to bid three no-trump on hands like this. I think you made the right call — bidding four clubs figures to take you past your side's most likely game. You were unlucky, that's all. What is the chance that your LHO had five decent spades and didn't bid initially?

We were both vulnerable at Chicago Bridge when my LHO opened three hearts. My partner doubled for takeout, and my RHO bid four hearts. Holding ♠ 4-2,  9-4,  K-J-5-3-2, ♣ K-10-5-4, I passed, and we defended against four hearts down a trick, but we could have made five clubs. Should I have bid, passed, or doubled?

Huntington, W. Va.

If you feel the need to act, it must be right to bid four no-trump over four hearts. This is neither Blackwood nor to play, but shows both minors and asks partner to pick one. It is one of the more common meanings of four no-trump in competitive auctions. However, it is certainly not clear to bid here. Change your major-suit pattern to 3-1 (either way) and bidding would be far more attractive.

I read in a recent column that after an unopposed sequence (two clubs – two diamonds – two spades), responder should bid two no-trump with a 2-4-2-5 pattern instead of three clubs. (His seven-count consisted of four hearts to the king-queen and five clubs to the queen.) Apparently, the latter call would be construed as a second negative. However, instead of wrong-siding the no-trump, why not bid three hearts? This would allow partner to bid the no-trump game from the right side.

Early Warner, Waterbury, Conn.

I think a call of three hearts here should show a five-card suit, not four. You'd be worried if partner raised you, in case you were in a 4-3 (or even a 4-2) fit with no-trump better — and played the wrong way up to boot! But I agree it might work.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, January 18th, 2014

Cowardice, as distinguished from panic, is almost always simply a lack of ability to suspend the functioning of the imagination.

Ernest Hemingway


South North
Both ♠ 7 3
 K J 4 2
 A J 10 9
♣ K 9 4
West East
♠ Q J 10 9 2
 9 3
 8 5 3
♣ A J 2
♠ 8 6 5
 Q 10 7 6
 Q 6 4 2
♣ 10 5
South
♠ A K 4
 A 8 5
 K 7
♣ Q 8 7 6 3
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2♣ Pass
2 Pass 3 NT All pass

♠Q

Against three no-trump West led the spade queen. After holding off on the first round, declarer won the spade continuation. It was natural enough to play on clubs — a low card went to the king, which held, and declarer ducked the second round of the suit completely, hoping that West had started with the doubleton ace. No joy, for West won with the jack and cleared the spades.

One possibility now was to hope that the spades broke 4-4 and lead another club, However, South correctly decided to abandon the suit. Instead, he cashed the diamond king and finessed the 10. East won and exited passively with another diamond. Declarer cashed dummy’s two diamond winners, throwing two clubs from hand, and watched West’s discard with interest. That player parted with the heart three on the last diamond and kept his winning spades and club ace.

Now South came to hand with the heart ace and led another heart. When West showed out, it was easy to play low from the table and leave East on lead, compelling him to lead a heart into dummy’s K-J.

Curiously, if West lets a winning spade go on the last diamond, declarer is helpless. He cannot throw East in with a heart without covering West’s nine with the jack; then East has two natural heart tricks. Had West found this play, declarer would have regretted his failure to play the club queen from hand at trick three, a far easier way to knock out West’s sure club entry.


Your partner rates to have extra values (typically three-suited with short spades), and your hand has negative defense. Your heart length augurs that his heart tricks won't stand up, while your three small spades indicate your side has no future in trumps. You should therefore bid five hearts as a sort of two-way shot.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 6 5
 Q 10 7 6
 Q 6 4 2
♣ 10 5
South West North East
1♠ 2 4♠
Pass Pass Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, January 17th, 2014

Great literature is simply language charged with meaning to the utmost possible degree.

Ezra Pound


North North
Neither ♠ Q 10 9 8
 Q 5
 A K 7
♣ A K 10 8
West East
♠ 5 4 3
 A J 9 4 2
 8 5 3 2
♣ 5
♠ K J
 7 6 3
 Q J 9 4
♣ Q 7 6 3
South
♠ A 7 6 2
 K 10 8
 10 6
♣ J 9 4 2
South West North East
1♣ Pass
1♠ Pass 4♠ All pass

♣5

Today's deal is in response to a reader's letter about defensive signals other than attitude. As usual, there is not necessarily a single best way to pass on a message to your partner — in fact this article will suggest two entirely separate methods of signaling, and all you have to do is to establish with your partner which way you prefer.

You are defending four spades after partner has led the club five. Dummy’s ace wins and declarer plays ace and another spade. What do you lead after winning your spade king?

Let’s spell out what the two options are for signaling in trumps. The first, and somewhat more common one, is to play that a high-low signal in trumps suggests a desire to ruff. Therefore, if partner followed with the five then three of trumps, he must have a singleton club, and you should play a second club for him to ruff. Partner will score his heart ace, and later on, your club queen will be the setting trick.

The alternative and slightly more flexible approach is to use your play in trumps as suit preference, thus playing up the line asks for the low suit, while echoing in trump asks for the higher suit. If using this method, West will play the three, then four, of trump, and East will again give him the ruff.

Suit-preference gives you slightly more options because you can sometimes send a message for all three of the outstanding suits, while echoing for a ruff is a binary signal.


When the opponents intervene over one no-trump with a natural call or a bid that shows two suits, one of them being the bid suit, a sensible method for you to use is that all first doubles (from either side of the table) are for takeout. All subsequent doubles should be for penalty. Here, you can double two diamonds and plan to raise spades, or pass a two-heart response.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 7 6 2
 K 10 8
 10 6
♣ J 9 4 2
South West North East
1 NT 2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, January 16th, 2014

I try not to be too optimistic or pessimistic. If you're a pessimist, then that's depressing all the time; if you're an optimist and things don't work out, then that's depressing, too.

Nicholas Hoult


North North
East-West ♠ Q 3 2
 9 7 5
 A K Q 7 5 4
♣ 2
West East
♠ K 5
 K 6 3
 J 9 6 2
♣ A 9 8 3
♠ 10 9 8 7 6
 J 10 8
 —
♣ Q J 10 7 6
South
♠ A J 4
 A Q 4 2
 10 8 3
♣ K 5 4
South West North East
1 Pass
1 Pass 2 Pass
3 NT All pass    

♣3

Against three no-trump West naturally leads his fourth-highest club. South must win the first trick, of course. But how should he advance from there?

It looks as if you have nine top winners, but there is many a chance for a slip-up. True, there are indeed nine winners if diamonds split, and you do have a 90 percent chance of finding diamonds breaking 3-1 or 2-2. But just because the suit rates to behave, there is no reason for it to do so. If East has all four diamonds, you are in deep trouble. But what if it is West who has four diamonds?

You cannot afford to do anything but lead to a top diamond at trick two — if you make any other play in the suit, you risk looking incredibly foolish if East wins the jack. But what you must do is to start to unblock the diamonds by leading the diamond eight or 10 from your hand, winning with a high honor in dummy.

If you discover that West has all four of the missing diamonds, you can still recover with the aid of two finesses, but only if you have cleared the eight or 10 out of the way on the first round. When East shows out, you can use your two aces as entries to take two finesses against West by leading your remaining high spot-card from hand and forcing a cover, then crossing back to your hand for a second finesse.


The first question to answer is whether you have enough to force to game; the answer is an emphatic yes. That said, since two diamonds by you now would merely invite game, start with a cue-bid, then bid diamonds, and let the chips fall where they may.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 3 2
 9 7 5
 A K Q 7 5 4
♣ 2
South West North East
1♣ Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.