Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

A gambler never makes the same mistake twice. It's usually three or more times.

Terrence Murphy


West North
North-South ♠ A Q 8 2
 A
 Q 5 4 2
♣ K J 3 2
West East
♠ J 10 3
 10 7 6 3
 K 10 8 7 3
♣ 5
♠ K 6 4
 K 9 8 4 2
 J 9 6
♣ 10 7
South
♠ 9 7 5
 Q J 5
 A
♣ A Q 9 8 6 4
South West North East
Pass 1 1
2♣ 2 4♣ Pass
6♣ All pass    

7

One of my readers, Orville St. Clair, sent me this deal. He was playing a practice session with three students of his, on which he took a shot at six clubs.

He won the heart opening lead with the ace and pulled a round of trumps, revealing the 2-1 split. So he led a second round, winning in hand.

Now the spades had to be played for one loser. St Clair realized that he would make if East had either the king or the J-10 of spades. But before leading spades, he cashed the diamond ace in case he could drop the king. Next he led the spade seven, intending to run it to East, but West put in the 10, covered by the queen and king. Back came a diamond, ruffed, followed by a heart ruff and a diamond ruff. When the king did not appear, St. Clair finessed in spades for his contract.

In addition to the bridge hand, St. Clair mentioned that he had been a gambler on the horses when he was young. In a fashion that would make all of us investors proud, he recently correctly named all winners in a Pick-Six. For the first time in his life, he bought a brand new car, and will now focus on mentoring younger players as his way of paying back the friendly folks who helped him when he was just starting in the game. It is very satisfactory when good things happen to nice guys.


Your partner is NOT bidding two no-trump in an attempt to play there or in a no-trump game. As a hand that passed twice, he is scrambling for the best trump suit. He rates to have a weak hand with both minors and wants you to pick your longer suit. It is good strategy for responder to bid the cheaper suit in such instances, so bid three clubs and hope for the best.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 8 2
 A
 Q 5 4 2
♣ K J 3 2
South West North East
Pass 1
Dbl. 2 Pass Pass
Dbl. Pass 2 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

Unto the man of yearning thought
And aspiration, to do nought
Is in itself almost an act.

Christina Rossetti


South North
East-West ♠ K J 10 9 8 7
 A Q 3
 6 5 4
♣ 2
West East
♠ 5
 10 8 5
 K 10 8 7
♣ 7 6 5 4 3
♠ A
 K J 9 4
 J 9 3 2
♣ A J 10 9
South
♠ Q 6 4 3 2
 7 6 2
 A Q
♣ K Q 8
South West North East
1♠ Pass 2 NT* Dbl.
4♠ All pass    

*Game-forcing spade raise

♣7

In today's auction North should not jump to four spades immediately (which is essentially a pre-emptive bid) lest he shut his partner out of a slam. East should restrain himself from competing at too high a level without the highest ranking suit at unfavorable vulnerability. A takeout double of two no-trump looks completely reasonable, however. South has an absolute minimum opening bid, so jump to game to deny slam interest and no one will have anything more to say.

The lead of the club seven marks South with at least K-Q-8 in that suit, so East should resist the temptation to play third-hand high. He should withhold his club ace to avoid setting up two discards from dummy. There is no hand South can hold, consistent with the bidding, whereby East can let the contract through by holding up his club ace. However, even after that start, the defense still has work to do. When East wins his spade ace, he must lead a diamond to avoid setting up an extra trick for declarer.

Equally, when West eventually wins the diamond king, he must lead a heart to avoid a throw-in play against his partner. (If he does not do so, then after eliminating diamonds, declarer could throw East on lead with the third club and force a heart lead back into dummy’s A-Q.)

After all this work, the defense gets back two tricks in the red suits in exchange for the club ace and defeats the game.


I'm often asked if I could include the vulnerability in the bidding problems. This deal is certainly one where your action might be different depending on the vulnerability. I'd bid two spades in second seat vulnerable, but would open one spade if nonvulnerable. By contrast, in first seat a one-spade opening looks right at all vulnerabilities.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 10 9 8 7
 A Q 3
 6 5 4
♣ 2
South West North East
Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, August 19th, 2013

Show me a good and gracious loser and I'll show you a failure.

Knute Rockne


South North
East-West ♠ Q 9 5 4
 Q 10 7
 J 5
♣ K 10 8 5
West East
♠ 10 7
 J 6 4 3 2
 Q 9 8 6 3
♣ 4
♠ 8 3 2
 A 9 5
 10 7 4
♣ A J 6 3
South
♠ A K J 6
 K 8
 A K 2
♣ Q 9 7 2
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3♣ Pass
3* Pass 3** Pass
4♠ All pass    

*A four-card major

**showing spades

♣4

The auction in today's deal featured a convention called Puppet Stayman. After North asked for four- and five-card majors, South's response denied a five-card major but promised at least one four-card major. North now bid three hearts — the major he did not have — so that if South held four spades, the strong hand would become declarer. South could now jump to four spades to end the auction.

When West leads the club four, South calls for dummy’s 10. Plan the defense. The knee-jerk reaction for East is to insert the jack, to ensure two club tricks if partner has led away from the queen. But is partner likely to have led from queen-third — a dangerous lead around to the hand that is known to hold at least half the points in the pack?

More importantly, there is no sure way of beating the contract if partner has the club queen, as you can see 17 points in your hand plus dummy. So if partner has the club queen, he can have no other significant values, and there will be just three tricks for the defense.

Accordingly, you must hope that the four was a singleton. Rise with the ace and give partner a ruff. And, to ensure that West returns a heart rather than a diamond to secure a second ruff, carefully play back the club jack, a heavy suit-preference signal for hearts, the higher-ranking of the remaining plain suits.


East's auction shows 18-20 or so with a diamond stopper, but it does not guarantee an especially powerful holding in that suit. You really have no special clue as to your partner's shape, but leading the diamond nine looks as good as anything — and if it is wrong, you could hardly be blamed!

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ J 9 2
 Q 8 7 5
 9 4
♣ J 9 3 2
South West North East
1 Dbl.
Pass 1♠ Pass 1 NT
Pass 2 NT All pass  

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, August 18th, 2013

My wife and I have started playing duplicate after a long break and have found that times have changed — but we have not. We focus on evaluating our hands only by counting points but do not do a complete evaluation of our combined hands. Can you recommend any reading material that would help us evaluate our hands better?

Little Learning, Wichita Falls, Texas

Hand evaluation is truly one of the more complex areas of the game.

Evaluating trumps is well discussed by Larry Cohen in”The Law of Total Tricks.” “The Secrets of Winning Bridge” by Jeff Rubens is also very thought provoking. Mike Lawrence on hand evaluation is also good. (See the Wikipedia article on hand evaluation for further suggestions.)

I had a powerhouse: ♠ A-Q-4,  A-K-Q-6,  J-5, ♣ A-Q-4-3. I opened two clubs and heard an overcall of two diamonds on my left. My partner passed, suggesting scattered values, and my RHO raised to three diamonds. What would a double from me mean now? If it is takeout, should I make that call?

Wheel of Fortune, Portland, Ore.

I like the idea of passing with a takeout-oriented hand and doubling with a balanced hand, open to defending if partner is also balanced. So yes, I would pass and expect partner to show a four-card major.

Is a jump-shift by opener game-forcing? With ♠ A-5,  K-Q-7-4-3,  4, ♣ A-K-10-5-4, I opened one heart, and over my partner's response of one spade, I jumped to three clubs. When he rebid three hearts, I passed, thinking he had a bad hand. Was I wrong?

Out of Gas, Bellevue, Wash.

The jump to three clubs sets up an unequivocal game force, so you cannot pass three hearts. However, it might have been better for you to rebid two clubs; then over partner's two hearts you can bid three clubs, showing 5-5 and extras. This consults your partner on whether to stay low, or in which game to play.

When is it right to bid spades in response to a one-heart opening? Holding ♠ K-Q-7-5-3,  9-4-2,  Q-4-3, ♣ J-2, I responded one spade to one heart, then gave preference to two hearts over my partner's two-club rebid. My partner thought I should have raised directly. What do you say?

Piglet, Nashville, Tenn.

Your choice of introducing spades when you hold a good suit and poor hearts makes perfect sense. It will help partner to appreciate whether his cards fit yours. With better hearts or worse spades, a direct raise might be preferred.

When my partner has bid a major suit and has been overcalled in no-trump, should I lead his suit? My belief is that the no-trump bidder usually has two stoppers, and I have been burned a few times — whether I guess to lead that suit or not. I have come to the conclusion to lead his suit only when I have no better option. What do you think?

Robin Hood, Hartford, Conn.

I would always tend to lead a suit overcalled at the two-level — which should be a good one. I'd also be more inclined to lead his suit when you yourself are weak, and perhaps also if his overcall was a cheap one (as opposed to bidding one spade over a minor to mess up the opponents). Unbid suits should be led when you have a clear lead of that suit or if your opponents bid to no-trump confidently. But when in doubt, keep partner happy.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, August 17th, 2013

If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the results of a hundred battles.

Sun Tzu


North North
Neither ♠ A Q 6 5
 Q J 9
 9 8 4
♣ 9 4 3
West East
♠ 8 4
 8 7 4 2
 A 6
♣ K J 10 5 2
♠ K J 10 3 2
 K 10 6
 J
♣ Q 8 7 6
South
♠ 9 7
 A 5 3
 K Q 10 7 5 3 2
♣ A
South West North East
Pass Pass
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
3 Pass 3 Pass
4♣ Pass 4 Pass
5 All pass    

7

Bob Hamman was among the few to bid and make five diamonds in today's deal from last year's Olympiad in Lille.

You receive the lead of the heart seven, fourth highest or second from a bad suit, and if you had to play the hearts for no loser, the right play would be the nine. But here you may not need to make that desperate a move; finessing the queen leaves more tension in the ending, whether East covers or not.

East covers the queen with the king, reinforcing your opinion that the heart 10 is likely to be wrong. You advance a high diamond and are delighted to see the diamond jack falling from East, giving you an extra entry to dummy. Better still, the defenders play back a club instead of a major. Time to take advantage of their generosity!

You win the club, lead to the diamond nine to ruff a club, then cross over to the heart jack, eschewing the finesse. When you ruff out the third club and exit with a heart, you endplay North to lead a black suit and take care of your spade loser.

Had the defenders continued with a heart at trick three, you would have needed to rise with the jack and bring East under pressure by running all the trumps.

On the even more challenging spade shift at trick three, you would have had to rise with the ace to squeeze East — not easy, but maybe the indicated line?


This hand is at the lower end of the range for a penalty double that suggests your side has the balance of the high cards, so it typically shows at least 9 HCP. Your balanced hand pattern may make it somewhat unlikely that you have a big penalty coming, but then again, why shouldn't partner have extras?

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 6 5
 Q J 9
 9 8 4
♣ 9 4 3
South West North East
1♣ 1 NT
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, August 16th, 2013

Oh! My name is John Wellington Wells,
I’m a dealer in magic and spells.

W.S. Gilbert


West North
Both ♠ A K Q 8 3
 9
 K Q 10 9 4
♣ A 10
West East
♠ J 10 7 4 2
 A 6
 6 3
♣ K 8 6 4
♠ 9
 Q 5 2
 A 8 2
♣ Q J 9 7 5 3
South
♠ 6 5
 K J 10 8 7 4 3
 J 7 5
♣ 2
South West North East
Pass 1♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 3 Pass
3 Pass 3 NT Pass
4 All pass    

♣4

At last year's Olympiad tournament in Lille, Fredrik Nystrom demonstrated that he is not just an Olympic champion, but also an illusionist creating magic. But first, before looking at what happened, take Cezary Balicki's position as declarer to try to solve the problem.

You are in four hearts, neither of the opponents having interfered in the auction. You win West’s lead of the club six with the ace; East follows with the queen, indicating the jack, but not the king.

Your contract looks to be comfortable unless you lose three trump tricks. Since the easiest singleton to cope with is the queen with West, you play a trump to the king, but West wins with the ace and plays back the club four. You ruff away East’s jack and continue by playing the heart jack. You realize that you misguessed trumps when West follows suit and East wins the trick with the queen. East now cashes the diamond ace and returns the spade nine, which you win in dummy. Then what?

Balicki quite reasonably concluded that Nystrom had the singleton diamond ace. So instead of playing a diamond to try to get back to hand, he tried to cash the spade king and ruff a spade, hoping to reach his hand to pull the defenders’ last trump.

However, since Nystrom had his singleton in spades rather than diamonds, he could ruff the second spade and defeat the contract.


In context you have three great features to your hand. Good diamond support and a working card in your partner's second suit, plus short spades. You might just jump to five diamonds, but maybe it is right as a passed (and thus limited) hand to bid three spades, then follow up with five diamonds.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 9
 Q 5 2
 A 8 2
♣ Q J 9 7 5 3
South West North East
Pass Pass 1 1♠
2♣ 2♠ 3 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, August 15th, 2013

I speed through the antiseptic tunnel where the moving dead still talk of pushing their bones against the thrust of cure.

Anne Sexton


South North
North-South ♠ A K 9 8 7 5 2
 Q J 10
 9 8
♣ 4
West East
♠ 10
 8 7 6 3
 K 5 4
♣ Q 9 8 7 2
♠ J 3
 K 9 5 4
 7 6 3 2
♣ J 6 3
South
♠ Q 6 4
 A 2
 A Q J 10
♣ A K 10 5
South West North East
2 NT Pass 4* Pass
4 Pass 5♣ Pass
5 Pass 5 NT Pass
6♣ Pass 7 Pass
7 NT All pass    

*Slam-try in spades

8

In the quarterfinal of the Olympiad from Lille last year, Italy met Poland, and this was the last board of the third segment. Put yourself in the position of Giorgio Duboin. Your partner, the effervescent Antonio Sementa, has forgotten that you are playing teams, not pairs, and has thus put you in seven no-trump rather than seven spades. The good news is that the opponents lead hearts. When you play the queen from dummy, East contributes the four. How do you continue?

You can see that seven spades would be easy to make with the heart king onside. But how to make seven no-trump? Finessing for the diamond king is at best a 50 percent chance. Is there a way to take 13 tricks when the diamond finesse does not work?

Duboin found the solution: a double squeeze. He cashed the spade queen, and both opponents followed. Now he cashed the heart ace – maybe the king would be doubleton. Then he led a spade to the ace and a diamond to his ace.

Now Duboin ran the spades to reduce to a three-card ending in which he had kept three clubs in hand. Dummy had a diamond, a heart and a club, and each defender had to retain a red king against the threat in dummy. This in turn meant that when the club ace and king were cashed, declarer’s club 10 would be good for the 13th trick.

Despite this, Poland went on to win the match by a single IMP.


This is a minimum in high-cards for a simple raise to three diamonds, but it is a call that you must make. First of all, you really want a diamond lead against West's final contract. Second, with ruffing values in your hand, you have to assume that you will be offering your partner a trick or two if he becomes declarer.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10
 8 7 6 3
 K 5 4
♣ Q 9 8 7 2
South West North East
1♠ 2 2♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

What reinforcement we may gain from hope,
If not, what resolution from despair.

John Milton


West North
East-West ♠ K J 7
 J 8 3
 Q J 10 2
♣ Q 7 5
West East
♠ 9 8 5
 K 7 5 2
 7 4
♣ K J 8 2
♠ Q 6 4 3
 10 6
 K 9 5
♣ A 9 6 4
South
♠ A 10 2
 A Q 9 4
 A 8 6 3
♣ 10 3
South West North East
Pass Pass Pass
1 NT* Pass 3 NT All pass

*14-17

♠9

West's opening lead against three no-trump was very much open to discussion. While some would lead a low club, others would insist on a heart, while others, including me, would recommend the spade nine. This would be especially clear when the opponents are limited, but even here, leading from a sequence is as likely to be right as anything else, and somewhat less likely to cost a trick.

Say you lead the spade nine; dummy’s king wins, partner playing the three. Declarer next passes the diamond queen successfully, then repeats the diamond finesse. Now he leads a heart to his queen. Have you decided whether you will win or duck? And are you going to press on with spades or shift?

Given partner’s discouraging spade spot, if you ARE going to shift to clubs — which seems right — then the right play is surely the jack. If partner has the A-10, any club works, while if partner has the A-9, you need to pin the 10 in declarer’s hand, and a low club shift won’t work.

When the board came up in the Olympiad last year in Lille, Eduardo Scanavino of Argentina played three no-trump on a spade lead to the jack, queen, and king. Scanavino now deceptively led a low heart from hand. Schermer did extremely well to see through his ruse and hop up with the heart king to fire the club jack through for down one.


Normally, the range for a simple raise is six to nine HCP. With 10 HCP you would consider making a limit raise. But with such a balanced hand and so few controls, not to mention weak trumps, the simple raise to two hearts is more than enough.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 7
 J 8 3
 Q J 10 2
♣ Q 7 5
South West North East
1 2♣
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

A book that is shut is but a block.

Thomas Fuller


South North
Neither ♠ J 10 7 3
 A 7
 J 8 5
♣ A K 8 6
West East
♠ 9 5
 K 9 8 3 2
 10 7 3
♣ 5 4 3
♠ 8 6 4 2
 J 10 6
 A
♣ Q J 10 7 2
South
♠ A K Q
 Q 5 4
 K Q 9 6 4 2
♣ 9
South West North East
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
3 Pass 3 Pass
4♠ Pass 6 All pass

♣Q

In this deal from the Lille 2012 world championships, six diamonds generally came home when it was attempted, but one variation produced a particularly interesting problem for declarer.

Since the play is easy on any other lead (you are forced to run the heart lead to your queen), let’s say West leads a low club. What’s next?

It looks natural to go after trumps, and to protect against a 4-0 trump break, you need to lead toward the diamond king-queen rather than starting with the diamond jack. When East wins and shifts to a heart, you suddenly have a problem. Did you notice that a heart shift was going to jeopardize your entries? You might as well put up the heart queen now — more in hope than expectation. You won’t get any value out of your queen if you don’t.

When West covers, you take your heart ace and play a trump to the queen. Had trumps split 2-2, you would have been home free, but as it is, you need to unblock spades (don’t you?) before drawing the last trump. By cashing only two spades, all you can afford to take before drawing trumps, you will leave the suit temporarily blocked. But you do have a resource.

After drawing the last trump, you pitch your spade queen on the club king and have unscrambled the blockage. You now have two homes for your heart losers on the spade jack and spade 10.


I threw this problem in as a trap, to see if I could tempt anyone to make a takeout double or an overcall with totally unsuitable shape. Just because you have a minimum opening bid does not mean you have to bid when the opponents open. If the opponents bid and raise hearts, you may come to life with a double, but not until then.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ J 10 7 3
 A 7
 J 8 5
♣ A K 8 6
South West North East
1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, August 12th, 2013

Whither is fled the visionary gleam?
Where is it now, the glory and the dream?

William Wordsworth


East North
North-South ♠ Q 8 5
 8 7 5 3
 J 4
♣ A K 9 5
West East
♠ 9 4
 4 2
 A 10 9 8 7 3
♣ 8 6 2
♠ 10 7 3 2
 A K 9
 5 2
♣ Q J 4 3
South
♠ A K J 6
 Q J 10 6
 K Q 6
♣ 10 7
South West North East
Pass
1 NT Pass 2♣ Pass
2 Pass 4 All pass

4

In the World Championships held last summer in Lille, Patrick Jourdain of Wales reported on the match between the English Seniors (who at that point were undefeated, and had a clear lead in their group) when they met their closest follower, Israel.

At the other table Israel had reached three no-trump. On a diamond lead, given the risk that there might not be time to establish a heart trick (particularly if East could win the first heart to play a second diamond), declarer might well have been tempted into the double club-finesse. However, South chose to play on hearts instead, and with the diamonds 6-2, plus West having no entry, the game came home easily enough.

By contrast, at our featured table, where Gunnar Hallberg and John Holland faced David and Daniela Birman, a simple Stayman auction led to four hearts by South. David Birman led a trump, and Daniela won with the king and switched to the diamond five.

David Birman took the inference first that his partner held the two top trumps, and secondly that had South had a singleton diamond, it would have been right for her either to cash both top trumps before playing the diamond, or to win the first trump lead with the ace. So Birman ducked the diamond with an encouraging card. Now East won the next trump and led a second diamond to the ace and received her overruff to set the game.


When you are dealt a sequence, but partner has overcalled in another suit, you have an awkward choice. Here your diamond length suggests that you may be able to set up more tricks with the heart lead than with the diamond lead. So lead the heart queen, and mentally prepare your apologies if it doesn't work!

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 9 5 4
 Q J 10 7
 9 5 3
♣ K 8 5
South West North East
1♣ 1 1♠
Pass 2♠ Pass 4♠
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2013. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.