Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, September 16th, 2011

Dealer: East

Vul: Both

North

10 9 6 5

K 2

A K Q 5 3

9 7

West

A 8 4 3

10 8

J 6 4 2

J 6 3

East

K Q 2

A J 7 5

10 8 7

8 5 4

South

J 7

Q 9 6 4 3

9

A K Q 10 2

 

South West North East
      Pass
1 Pass 2 Pass
3 Pass 3 Pass
3 NT All Pass    

Opening Lead: Spade 3

“It is not enough to do good; one must do it the right way.”


– Viscount Morley

Do you enjoy measuring your performance against that of the world’s experts? If so, take the East seat and cover up the South and West hands. You will be defending against three no-trump.

 

Partner leads the spade three (fourth-highest leads) and your queen holds. Where do you go for honey? It can do no harm to cash the spade king, for if South had held the ace, he would have played it on your queen, trying to guarantee a second trick in the suit for his side. Your concern is the whereabouts of the spade jack. If your partner has that card, life should be easy for the defense.

 

Irritatingly, South produces the jack under your king. South must have most of the outstanding honors, apart from the spade ace, for his bidding. How do you set up an extra trick for your side?

 

The bottom line is that nothing you do really matters if declarer has a doubleton diamond, but what if he has a singleton diamond? Maybe you can disrupt his communications.

 

So reasoned Italian World Champion Alfredo Versace, who returned a low diamond to the nine, jack and ace. See the effect of this. Declarer is forced to take dummy’s three diamond tricks before he is ready to do so — which would have been after he had set up a heart trick and not before. Now declarer could not come to nine tricks before the defenders came to five, the fifth being West’s diamond six.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

A 8 4 3
10 8
J 6 4 2
J 6 3

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
1 2 2 Pass
3 Pass 3 Pass
?      
ANSWER: Your partner has shown significant extras with three spades, four hearts and five clubs. Your three-club call was nonforcing, but even so you do not seem to have anything to spare. You should simply revert to four clubs and let partner move on if he still has something in hand.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, September 15th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

K 10 7 5 3

J 6 3

10 4

Q 5 3

West

J 2

Q 10 7 5 2

9 8 2

10 9 8

East

9 8 4

8 4

A J 6 5

A J 4 2

South

A Q 6

A K 9

K Q 7 3

K 7 6

 

South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 Pass
3 Pass 3 NT Pass
4 All Pass    
       

Opening Lead: Club 10

“Time is the feathered thing,

And, whilst I praise

The sparklings of thy looks and call them rays,

Takes wing.”


– Jasper Mayne

Sally Brock of England reported this deal, in which she had declared four spades rather than the somewhat easier three no-trump. Brock was not sure she would be buying a balanced hand opposite, but did know of the 5-3 spade fit.

 

Against four spades, West led the club 10. Brock won in hand and played the spade queen, then the ace, followed by a third trump to dummy. Next, she played a diamond to her king, then exited with a second diamond, which ran to East’s jack.

 

East now switched accurately to a heart. Brock won with the ace and ruffed a diamond, hoping the ace would fall. When it didn’t, she crossed to her heart king and played the diamond queen, discarding dummy’s heart jack. With nothing left but clubs now, East had to lead around to the club queen.

 

Subsequently, Brock noted that had she started drawing trumps with the spade ace first and the queen second, then when West’s jack appeared, she could have overtaken her queen with dummy’s king and played a diamond. Another trump to dummy would have allowed her to play a second diamond and come to 10 tricks more easily.

 

But Brock later considered what might have happened in this variation if West had started with a spade holding of J-9-8-2. Wouldn’t dropping the spade jack on the second round be a terrific falsecard, tempting declarer to overtake — and create a spade loser where none had existed before?


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

9 8 4
8 4
A J 6 5
A J 4 2

 

South West North East
  1 1 Pass
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: Your hand is certainly good enough for you to raise to three diamonds, rather than tamely passing. The only question is if you have enough to do more than produce the courtesy raise. Calls of both three clubs and two spades would sound like cue-bids in support of diamonds. I think you would need a fifth diamond, or maybe the diamond queen instead of the jack, to be worth either of those actions.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

K 10 4

K

A Q J 9 8

A 10 7 5

West

Q 7

A Q 4 2

5 4 3

K J 9 3

East

6 2

J 9 8 7 6 5

K 7 6

Q 4

South

A J 9 8 5 3

10 3

10 2

8 6 2

 

South West North East
2 Pass 4 All Pass
       
       
       

Opening Lead: Club 3

“I accept refreshment at any hands, however lowly.”


– W.S. Gilbert

You might care to plan the play in four spades by South, since at the table some experts found it harder than they should have.

 

Any West who led the heart ace at trick one gave declarer an easy task. West then switched to a club, but declarer ducked the first club, won the continuation, drew trumps, then took the diamond finesse, losing just one club, one diamond and one heart.

 

An opening club leads makes it much harder. Superficially, four spades seems to depend (after getting trumps right) on the diamond finesse. Because it was wrong, declarer had to go down.

 

South was in too much of a hurry to take that diamond finesse. Once declarer has avoided a trump loser, he will have no problems if the diamond finesse is right. The correct line is to duck the first club, win the club continuation, and cash the two top spades. If the spade queen is still outstanding, then declarer must take the diamond finesse; if it is right, he rates to be able to discard all his losers on the diamonds.

 

However, if trumps are 2-2, South does not need the diamond finesse. He simply plays another club. He knows that clubs are either 3-3 or that they lie as they do. (West would have led the jack from an original jack-doubleton.) West can go in with the king and switch to a diamond, but declarer rises with dummy’s ace and discards his losing diamond on dummy’s club 10.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K 10 4
K
A Q J 9 8
A 10 7 5

 

South West North East
1 Pass 1 Pass
?      
       
       
ANSWER: There are three promising candidates. You might jump to two no-trump, force to game with a jump to three clubs, or go low with a bid of two clubs. If your partner had responded in your three-card suit, you might force to game, but here your hand has gotten worse, not better. A simple two clubs is surely enough for the time being. Give me the spade jack instead of the 10 and I’d bid two no-trump.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, September 13th, 2011

Dealer: East

Vul: Both

North

K Q 7 6 4

Q 10 3

K 6 3

K 2

West

A 9 8

A K 7 6 2

9 8 5

7 4

East

J 5

J 9 4

7 2

Q J 9 6 5 3

South

10 3 2

8 5

A Q J 10 4

A 10 8

 

South West North East
      Pass
1 1 2 * Pass
2 Pass 3 NT Pass
4 All Pass    
*Spades

Opening Lead: Heart King

“If you give to a thief he cannot steal from you, and he is then no longer a thief.”


– William Saroyan

Today’s deal comes from this year’s trials to select the Australian team for the Asia-Pacific Bridge Championships. Both teams declared four spades, but at one table it was played by North. Despite his partner’s overcall, East thought it might be a good idea to lead from his club sequence. He knows better now!

 

Declarer simply won in dummy and led a spade to his hand, then crossed back to dummy with a diamond to play a second spade. He made 10 tricks with the minimum of fuss.

 

Where the auction was as shown, North-South were playing transfers after intervention, so had an artificial way to show spades after the one-heart overcall. That put West, Bruce Neill, on lead, and when he saw dummy hit with a full opening bid, he decided his best chance to set the game was to find his partner with the spade jack. He pressed on with two more rounds of hearts, letting South win dummy’s heart queen and lead a club to hand to play a spade up. Neill hopped up with the ace and played a fourth heart, leaving declarer to guess whether to ruff high and try to drop the spade jack, or whether to discard from dummy in the hope that West had the spade jack. He guessed wrong — and regardless of whether he followed the percentage line or not, I think West deserved to set the game because he had at least given declarer the chance to go wrong.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

10 3 2
8 5
A Q J 10 4
A 10 8

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
1 Pass 1 Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: You have no easy way to show your invitational values and no guaranteed fit. You are too good for a simple club preference, so the choice is to rebid three diamonds (promising a six-card suit) or to jump to three clubs. The latter would be my choice, since my partner’s one-spade rebid over one diamond strongly suggested an unbalanced hand. He would have rebid one no-trump if balanced.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, September 12th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: North-South

North

Q 6

A J 3 2

K J 10 4

10 5 4

West

7 5

K 10 6

A Q 9 8 2

K Q J

East

J 9 2

8

7 6 5

9 8 7 6 3 2

South

A K 10 8 4 3

Q 9 7 5 4

3

A

 

South West North East
1 Dbl. Rdbl. 3 *
3 Pass 4 Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
6 All Pass    
*Pre-emptive

Opening Lead: Club King

“Dear hope! Earth’s dowry, and heaven’s debt!

The entity of those that are not yet.”


– Richard Crashaw

You might have avoided playing an anti-percentage heart slam today if you had been using Keycard Blackwood, when the trump king counts as an ace. But once you are there, you’d better make your slam!

 

The play of this hand revolves around the trump suit. Had there been no bidding, the normal play in hearts would be low to the jack. If both follow low, the ace is played, and on a good day the suit will be 2-2. If East plays the 10 under the jack, the closed hand can be re-entered for a lead of the queen through West’s king.

 

However, West’ takeout double of one major pretty much guaranteed support for the other. So you should play West for at least three hearts. If he has four hearts or the K-10-8, you are a dead man walking. However, if West has the heart K-10-6 or the K-8-6, you are alive and well.

 

Lead the heart queen at trick two, which will surely be covered. If East plays the heart six, you have no recourse. However, if East produces the heart eight or 10, re-enter the closed hand to lead the heart nine, repeating the finesse and almost certainly picking up the suit for no losers. As an added bonus, after drawing trumps, you will make an overtrick if spades break 3-2 or the jack is singleton. You can pitch four diamonds from dummy on four spades, eventually ruffing your singleton diamond in dummy!


LEAD WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K J 7
6 4 3 2
J 10 2
A 10 2

 

South West North East
    Pass 1
Pass 2 Dbl. 3
All Pass      
       
ANSWER: A trump lead looks sensible, in case declarer wants to try to ruff a major in dummy. If you lead a trump, you should choose a small one, in case your partner has a singleton king or queen. That way you avoid crashing his honor and setting up a finesse against your remaining honor.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, September 11th, 2011

Dear Mr. Wolff:

Given that today is the 10th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, do you know whether any prominent bridge players died in the attacks?

–  Day of Infamy, Grand Forks, N.D.

ANSWER: There were a great many bridge-playing options traders working in the vicinity of Wall Street, but I believe none died. Relatives of bridge players were killed, I know, but that is the closest connection I’m aware of.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

Holding SPADES 9-6-4-2, HEARTS J-7-3-2, DIAMONDS A, CLUBS K-9-7-4, I was on lead against six diamonds, reached after an inverted-minor sequence. Declarer had shown a balanced minimum and dummy had driven to slam. What would you have led?

–  Kickoff, Anchorage, Alaska

ANSWER: There is a lot to be said for leading your trump ace, not so much to look at dummy as to get the albatross off your neck. If you don’t, you may be endplayed with it later, forced to lead one of the other suits and clear up a guess or, worse, give up your side’s trick in that suit.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

As dealer, I held this minimum balanced hand: SPADES Q-9, HEARTS A-K-7-3-2, DIAMONDS J-3-2, CLUBS A-9-6. I opened one heart, rebidding one no-trump over my partner’s one-spade response. He now inquired with two clubs (New Minor Forcing), then jumped to three spades over my two-heart rebid. What should I have done next?

–  Ray of Sunshine, Albany, Ga.

ANSWER: With a fitting spade honor and good controls, you have too much to raise to four spades. You should show slam interest by cue-bidding four clubs, hoping to bid four hearts over a return cue-bid of four diamonds from your partner. In some cases, even if you only had second-round club control, you might be worth a cue-bid. Imagine the same hand with the spade king and club king instead of your actual honors.

  Dear Mr. Wolff:

When filling out an ACBL card, I can see the conventions they advise us might be relevant. But what are the extra agreements you like to make in a scratch partnership, when sitting down with an expert for the first time?

–  Fill-In Phil, Vancouver, British Columbia

ANSWER: Among other things, I think it important to discuss responder’s various forms of checkback over a one-no-trump or two-no-trump rebid by opener, and also the way we play fourth-suit forcing. Additionally, we need to decide whether jump shifts are weak or fit-showing, and to discuss our two-suited overcalls and our defense to our opponents’ two-suiters.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

Here is what happened to me in a match we lost by 1 IMP. I was dealt SPADES 9, HEARTS A-K-Q-2, DIAMONDS J-9-3-2, CLUBS K-J-10-4 and opened one club (lead-directing). My partner bid two no-trump and I raised to three, doubled by the hand on lead to the game. Was I wrong to redouble? I thought this expressed doubt, but it led to minus 1000 while our teammates defended against five clubs, which could not be beaten. The player on lead had solid spades, of course.

–  Unlucky Expert, Kansas City, Mo.

ANSWER: When people write to me, I hate to disagree with them, but in this case I believe the redouble is not SOS, but to play. I would have guessed, by the way, that if anyone is supposed to remove the double, it is you. Here, your singleton spade is a red flag; your partner may not be able to guess which suit is the danger, but you know. I do agree with the one-club opening though!

 


If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, e-mail him at bobbywolff@mindspring.com. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, September 10th, 2011

Dealer: West

Vul: Both

North

J

A J 9 7 6

A 9 8 5

J 7 6

West

10 9 8 5 3

Q 8

Q 7 4

9 8 5

East

A K 7 6

10 5 4 3 2

2

A 4 2

South

Q 4 2

K

K J 10 6 3

K Q 10 3

 

South West North East
  Pass 1 Pass
2 Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 Pass
3 NT All Pass    

Opening Lead: Spade 10

“Good families are generally worse than any others.”


– Robert South

Michael Seamon of Florida is part of one of the most distinguished families of bridge, four of his family having participated successfully in world championships. Seamon found a fine play in this deal from a recent U.S. trial — based on a second-degree assumption of how he needed the cards to lie.

 

Seamon’s call of two diamonds was forcing to game, so his quiet two-no-trump bid on the second round did not end the auction. North’s failure to raise diamonds directly had suggested that he had only three diamonds — hence the decision to play the inferior no-trump game.

 

West led the spade nine to the jack and king, and East returned a low spade to Seamon’s queen. Declarer had a spade trick now, but was still a long way from home. He needed to find the diamond queen and also to negotiate the heart suit for three tricks — a fairly unlikely combination of events.

 

However, his first move was to cash the heart king, noting the fall of West’s eight. Needing this to be from shortness (specifically the queen-doubleton), Seamon inferred that all the probabilities in that case would indicate that West would have longer diamonds than East. He backed his judgment by cashing the diamond king and finessing West for the queen on the next round. When the heart ace brought down the queen, he had nine tricks without touching clubs — a game swing. It was a hand for us all to admire.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

J
A J 9 7 6
A 9 8 5
J 7 6

 

South West North East
  3 3 Pass
?      
       
       
ANSWER: What an unpleasant choice! You can pass pessimistically, raise to four spades, or bid four hearts. All of these calls are seriously flawed, but the spade raise at least offers partner a trump honor and two aces, so it would be my choice.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, September 9th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

K 10 8 4 3

8 6

9 6 4

A K 6

West

Q 9 2

9 5 4

A Q 5 2

J 9 2

East

7 6

J 7 2

J 10 8 7 3

10 7 4

South

A J 5

A K Q 10 3

K

Q 8 5 3

 

South West North East
1 Pass 1 NT* Pass
3 Pass 3 Pass
3 Pass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 6 All Pass
*Spades

Opening Lead: Diamond Ace

“Speech was given to the ordinary sort of men whereby to communicate their mind, but to wise men, whereby to conceal it.”


– Robert South

As a defender, whenever you hold the trump queen, you look for ways to protect it. Similarly, when you can infer that declarer is trying to find the trump queen and you know your partner has it, go out of your way to suggest that you have that card. Surely one of the most imaginative ways to put declarer on the wrong track came on the following deal from the European Championships between Iceland and Romania. It arose over 20 years ago — a highly relevant fact, in a curious way.

 

North-South reached the small slam in spades after South had shown a strong 3-5-1-4 shape. Gudmundur Arnarson led the diamond ace, which dropped declarer’s king. He could have continued with another diamond, in which case declarer would surely have guessed trumps correctly (since even 4-1 trumps onside might be negotiable via a trump coup).

 

But instead, Arnarson found the deeply devious shift to the spade nine at trick two. Declarer hopped up with dummy’s 10 and then decided to play a spade to his jack — can you blame him? This protected against the 4-1 splits — although it severely underestimated Arnarson, who would surely have pressed on with a diamond at trick two, had that been the case.

 

Had the Romanian declarer encountered the deal after Arnarson won the Bermuda Bowl in 1991, I doubt if he would have followed such a deeply unflattering line…


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K 10 8 4 3
8 6
9 6 4
A K 6

 

South West North East
      1
1 Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 2 NT Pass
?      
ANSWER: You limited your hand at your second turn to a minimum overcall, and your partner has invited game, suggesting about 14-15 in high cards. In context, your hand is reasonably well put together, so you have just enough to accept the invitation: bid three no-trump.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, September 8th, 2011

Dealer: North

Vul: Neither

North

K 10 8 7 3

Q

A 10 3

A J 5 2

West

5 4

7 5 3

K J 6 2

K Q 10 8

East

A Q J 9 2

A K 9 8

Q 8 5

3

South

6

J 10 6 4 2

9 7 4

9 7 6 4

 

South West North East
    2 * Pass
3 Pass Pass Dbl.
All Pass      
       
*Spades and clubs, 11-15

Opening Lead: Heart 3

“Though I beheld at first with blank surprise

This Work, I now have gazed on it so long

I see its truth with unreluctant eyes.”


– William Wordsworth

Twenty years ago Tony Forrester wrote a bridge tip about the power of the closed hand, and how declarer can generate tricks if he conceals his assets well. One of my favorite closed-hand stories deals with what I am convinced will be close to a world record when it comes to stealing tricks.

 

North-South had got themselves into their best fit, albeit a level or two too high, and East had done well to find a takeout double, converted to penalties by West.

 

As the auction had shown, East was a thoughtful and competent player. But West was a weaker player, and instead of leading the obvious trump against three clubs doubled, he decided to lead a heart. East won this to switch to his singleton club. South took this in dummy and decided to try for a crossruff. Since East was clearly stacked in spades, he led a low spade from dummy, hoping to give East a problem.

 

Everyone followed in tempo, but South was more than a little surprised to find his six taking the trick! East, who knew that declarer had at most one spade for this line of play, had gone with the percentages, hoping his partner had the spade six so that he could continue the attack on trumps. Unluckily for him, his play not only allowed declarer to steal a trick, but also to establish a heart trick. Now a mini-crossruff saw him escape for two down.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

5 4
7 5 3
K J 6 2
K Q 10 8

 

South West North East
  3 Dbl. 4
?      
       
       
ANSWER: Here, your choice is between a double, which is NOT penalties but card-showing (tending to deny spades or you would have bid them yourself) and a call of four no-trump, which would be my choice. That call suggests both minors, and I admit you would be happier with 5-4 pattern. But your weak heart length does suggest partner has a singleton; so I’d guess five of a minor will play just fine.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: Both

North

8 7 6

K J 9 6 5 4 3

A 10 7

West

A J 10 9 8 5

Q 10 7 2

K 5 3

East

6 3

A Q 10 4

Q J 9 8 6 4 2

South

K Q 7 4 2

K J 9 5 3 2

A 8

 

South West North East
1 1 2 3
Pass 5 5 Dbl.
All Pass      
       

Opening Lead: Club 3

“World is crazier and more of it than we think,

Incorrigibly plural.”


– Louis Macneice

What do you think the result of a heart contract for North-South might be on this deal? With trumps 4-0 and a foul spade break, it seems you would be struggling in game however you play it, but appearances are sometimes deceptive.

 

Both tables in a USA-Netherlands match competed to five hearts, and were doubled. When Bob Hamman and I were defending, Hamman led a club. Declarer took the ace in dummy and played a heart to the king, followed by the diamond ace. I ruffed, cashed my top trumps, and then exited with a spade. Hamman won the ace and thoughtfully continued with a diamond, breaking up any pressure in the endgame and collecting two more spade tricks for a penalty of 800.

 

By contrast, in the other room our teammate Richard Freeman won the club ace and chose to play a heart to the jack. Such a small difference, but now he could advance the spade king from hand, covered and ruffed, and then lead a second heart from dummy. With the defensive spade communication cut, all East could do was win his ace and play a second spade. Freeman took the queen and played the heart king and another heart; East got his two trump tricks, but had only clubs left to lead. Freeman ruffed and led his last trump, and West was painfully squeezed in spades and diamonds. Whatever he did, declarer had the rest, for plus 850 and 17 IMPs to the USA!


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

8 7 6
K J 9 6 5 4 3
A 10 7

 

South West North East
3 Pass 3 Pass
?      
       
       
ANSWER: You may not want to make a call, but the laws demand it. You cannot pass, because your partner’s bid is forcing, and repeating such a feeble diamond suit seems wrong. Since a bid of four clubs is a cue-bid for spades, and you would rather have slightly better spades for that action, bid three no-trump, and let the chips fall where they may.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.