Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, November 11th, 2011

Dealer: West

Vul: Both

North

A K J 10

10 5

6 4

Q J 9 7 4

West

9 7 6 4

A 3

10 9 8 7 3

K 2

East

8 3 2

K 7 6 4 2

A Q

A 6 5

South

Q 5

Q J 9 8

K J 5 2

10 8 3

 

South West North East
  Pass 1 1
1 NT All Pass    
       
       

Opening Lead: Diamond Ten

“Small is beautiful.”


– E.F. Schumacher

Larry Cohen, famed for publicizing the “Law of Total Tricks,” has won many American titles, most in partnership with Dave Berkowitz, but is in temporary retirement – and working on his golf game.

 

It was Cohen, a professional bridge teacher, who originally picked up on this hand from the 2000 Olympiad, on which more than a few top players failed in their contract of one no-trump. Cover the East and West hands and try it for yourself.

 

West did not lead a heart, which would have life easy for declarer, but the diamond 10. East overtook with the ace and played back the queen. Plan the play after capturing this trick with the king. Which is the right suit to go after?

 

The answer is that it doesn’t matter — you have already gone down in your contract! You can count on six tricks, but whether you set about establishing clubs or hearts, the defenders will win the race to seven tricks. Say you play on hearts: West wins the first heart lead and continues diamonds, which will remove your last stopper. When East gets in with the heart king, he can cash the club ace and play a low club to West’s king, allowing the two established diamond tricks to be cashed.

 

However, by allowing East’s diamond queen to hold, you guarantee seven tricks for yourself. Even if East has a third diamond, the defenders can only come to two diamond tricks, for then the suit would be breaking 4-3.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

A K J 10
10 5
6 4
Q J 9 7 4

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
?      
       
       
ANSWER: It is almost never wrong to introduce a four-card major in response to a minor suit for which you have support. It is especially true that when your four-card suit looks like five, it is mandatory to bid the suit now. Conversely, I suppose that if you had four small spades in a slam-going hand, you might start with a forcing club raise. But of course that is not the case today.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, November 10th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: Neither

North

K 6 4

10 9 8 5

A Q 7 2

7 2

West

J 8 3

K 4 2

J 10 6 4 3

8 4

East

Q 9 7

A 7 6

9

K Q 10 9 5 3

South

A 10 5 2

Q J 3

K 8 5

A J 6

 

South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 Dbl.
2 Pass 3 Pass
3 NT All Pass    
       

Opening Lead: Club Eight

“I was enjoying the blessed privilege of thinking without being called on to stand and deliver what I thought to the small public who are good enough to take any interest therein.”


– James Lowell

In today’s deal the auction to three no-trump was informative to the defense. In response to his partner’s double, West led the club eight, and East naturally put up his queen. Reading West’s lead as top of a doubleton, declarer held off. Even if diamonds broke 3-3, South knew he would need a trick from the heart suit, and he had calculated that so long as East held no more than one of the missing top heart honors, he would succeed, since West would have no more clubs to play through.

 

At trick two, East continued with the club king, won by South’s ace. Declarer still had a club stopper, and when he tackled hearts, East gained the lead and dislodged the club jack, but with no further entries, he could not enjoy the suit he had worked so hard to establish.

 

See the difference if East plays the club nine on the opening lead. South must win with the jack, but now when he plays a heart, West wins with the king, and still has another club to push through. Whether South holds up the club ace or not, East will regain the lead with the heart ace to cash the clubs.

 

Third hand plays high, but there is a time and a place for everything. It is often easy to see that one should withhold the ace on the first round of a suit. It is less easy to see that this applies in positions like the one in today’s deal.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K 6 4
10 9 8 5
A Q 7 2
7 2

 

South West North East
  1 Dbl. 2
?      
       
       
ANSWER: You are much too good to pass here. The question is whether to bid three hearts or double, and what the latter call should say about your heart holding. My plan would be to double for takeout — neither promising nor denying hearts, planning to convert a three-club response to three hearts. I would intend this sequence to mean that I had only four hearts but constructive values.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

K 10 8

K 9 2

A J 6 5 2

A 9

West

3 2

10 5 4 3

Q 10 8 7 3

J 4

East

9 7 6

7

K 9

K Q 10 6 5 3 2

South

A Q J 5 4

A Q J 8 6

4

8 7

 

South West North East
1 Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
4 Pass 4 NT Pass
5 * Pass 7 All Pass
*Two key-cards and the spade queen

Opening Lead: Spade Two

“Of all human follies there’s none could be greater

Than trying to render our fellow-men better.”


– Moliere

In today’s deal, you are South. Plan the play in seven spades after West leads the trump two. You appear to have a club loser in both hands. You can pitch a club from dummy but only after drawing trump — so that won’t do you any good. What can you do to avoid the ugly fate of going down in a freely bid grand slam?

 

You must aim to reverse the dummy, which means taking ruffs in the long hand and drawing trump with the short hand. You can achieve this by ruffing three diamonds in the South hand. This will give you three trump tricks, three diamond ruffs, two minor-suit aces and five heart tricks. This line requires trump to behave. If they don’t, you really have no chance at all.

 

So win the trump lead with your jack, play a diamond to the ace, and ruff a diamond in hand.

 

Now you need to cross to dummy to take another diamond ruff. Which honor should you cross to? It is vital to cross to dummy with the heart king because otherwise, as here, someone might be able to discard his singleton heart on the next diamond. The general tip is that when in doubt in playing a crossruff, you should always use the dangerous entry first.

 

This deal comes from “52 Great Bridge Tips on Declarer Play” by David Bird.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

A Q J 5 4
A Q J 8 6
4
8 7

 

South West North East
  1 Pass 1
1 2 Pass Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: The auction may seem surprising, even suspicious, but your partner has the opportunity to overcall or raise spades and did not do so. Accordingly, he appears to have a bust, with a lot of minor-suit cards. Since a double of two hearts would be takeout (hearts have been bid and raised and you are facing a passed partner), what can you do but pass?

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Dealer: East

Vul: Both

North

A J 10 7 3

10 9 7 5 3 2

Q 5

West

K 6 3 2

Q J 4

A J 9 7 6 4

East

Q 4

Q 9 8 7 5 4

K

K 10 3 2

South

K 9 8 6 5 2

A J 10

A 8 6

8

 

South West North East
      2
2 4 4 Pass
Pass 5 5 All Pass
       

Opening Lead: Club Ace

“It is easier to discover a deficiency in individuals, in states, and in Providence, than to see their real import and value.”


– Friedrich Hegel

Bridge literature is filled with suit combinations with which you should try to make the opponents do the heavy lifting, rather than try to do the hard work yourself. Sometimes the strategy needed to persuade your opponents to sacrifice themselves is obvious, but in a deal like today’s, the approach is far from obvious. Enough clues: let’s look at how South should play five spades. West leads the club ace, followed by a club to East’s king.

 

Now the hand appears to hinge on diamonds breaking 2-2, but that is an oversimplification. Your chances are considerably better than that, if you take advantage of a neat variation on a standard theme, that of the elimination play. Declarer should ruff the club at trick two, ruff a heart, then play the spade ace and a spade to his king, cash the heart ace, and ruff a heart.

 

Now declarer plays a low diamond from dummy and, when East produces an honor, ducks. As long as diamonds are either 2-2 or 3-1 with one hand holding a singleton honor, he is home. When East wins the trick, all he can do is give a ruff-sluff, and the diamond loser from the South hand goes away.

 

(Admittedly, on a different day, if East were to rise with the king and then exit with the four, declarer would have to guess whether to play him for K-4 doubleton or K-Q-4. Fortunately, today is not that day!)


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K 9 8 6 5 2
A J 10
A 8 6
8

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
1 Pass 2 Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: Today’s deal is all about partnership agreements, not about the correct call. When North reverses (bidding a suit at his second turn that forces South to give preference at the three-level), he guarantees real extras. If you play as I do that a call of two spades by South here is forcing, then make that call and allow North to describe his hand further. If not, bid two hearts as the fourth suit to set up a force.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, November 7th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: Neither

North

K 10 9 2

Q 9 3

9 4 2

K 4 2

West

6 5

J 7 6 5

A J 8 6 5

8 7

East

Q 8 7 4 3

K 10 4 2

3

A J 10

South

A J

A 8

K Q 10 7

Q 9 6 5 3

 

South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 3 NT All Pass
       
       

Opening Lead: Diamond Six

“To me, fair friend, you never can be old.”


– William Shakespeare

After a few years away from the game, Seymon Deutsch has started to play both open and senior events seriously again. Seymon and I were partners in his first world title in Venice in 1988, and he has always been one of my favorite partners.

 

Here, playing three no-trump in an invitational pairs event, he received a diamond lead to dummy’s nine. Next came a club to the jack and queen, then a club to East’s 10.

 

East could see that he might be endplayed, so elected to cash the club ace and exit with a spade to declarer’s jack, avoiding any further endplays.

 

Seymon cashed the first club winner, both West and North discarding a diamond and East a spade. Then he played off the spade ace, and took the fifth club (West discarding a heart, North and East letting go spades).

 

With the lead in hand at trick nine, and declarer having taken six tricks, South advanced the diamond king to West’s ace as East pitched his spade queen. West exited with the heart jack, covered by the queen, king and ace. South now led out the heart eight and could not be prevented from taking two of the last three tricks. Notice that if West had ducked the diamond king, declarer would have been able to take only eight tricks. Whether declarer plays a diamond or a heart, he can only score his heart ace.


LEAD WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

9 3
A 10 6 3
Q 10 5
K 5 3 2

 

South West North East
    1 1
Dbl. 2 Pass 4
All Pass      
       
ANSWER: You must lead a trump, since dummy surely rates to have a short side-suit and possibly only three trumps. This way you stand a chance of getting a second trump in and killing one of the ruffs.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, November 6th, 2011

Dear Mr. Wolff:

In second seat I was holding SPADES Q-9-3, HEARTS K-9-4-2, DIAMONDS A-Q-J-3, CLUBS 7-4 and my RHO opened one spade. Do you approve of my doubling here? What would your plan be if your partner bids two clubs? Can you escape from the pit you have dug for yourself?

–  Spelunker, Mitchell, S.D.

ANSWER: Let me take the second question first. If you double and your partner bids clubs, you must pass. Grin and bear it, as they say. Should you double? Well, no one is more aggressive about doubling than I, but I might pass. Throw in the club queen and I’d feel compelled to risk the double. However, I will happily double a minor with a doubleton in the other minor.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

As someone who believes in playing weak jumps in competition, I’m not sure whether to play these methods when facing an overcall, when third hand acts, or whether all bets about weak jumps are off by a passed hand. Where do you stand here?

–  Hopalong Cassidy, White Plains, N.Y.

ANSWER: I strongly believe that weak jumps in new suits (as opposed to weak jump raises) are wrong facing an overcall — you can’t fool opponents who are both bidding. Likewise, jumps by a passed hand can’t sensibly be played as pre-emptive. If you had that hand, you’d have bid already. In both cases I play a jump as promising a fit for partner and showing a suit I want partner to lead — ideally, a five-carder headed by at least two of the top four cards.

  Dear Mr. Wolff:

My partner, with SPADES A-7-2, HEARTS A-K-9-5-4, DIAMONDS 3, CLUBS 10-8-7-4, opened one heart in first seat; I’m not sure I agree with that, but never mind. The question is what to rebid after I responded two diamonds, natural and game-forcing. His choice of three clubs got us way too high, but he said that this call did not promise extras in high cards or shape. What do you say?

–  On My Uppers, San Luis Obispo, Calif.

ANSWER: Wild horses would not drag a three-club call from me. I’d rebid two hearts, not promising a sixth heart, although I could understand a two-no-trump call. For me, a three-club bid shows some extras or 5-5. I would open the hand because of the controls and the good suit, though.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

I’m a bit confused as to how the forcing no-trump affects the ability to raise partner constructively. Don’t you always raises partner’s major if you have three-card support?

–  Helping Hand, Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

ANSWER: One can get to two of a major either directly or through a forcing no-trump response. I’d say the direct raise was constructive, suggesting a good seven to 10 points. Going through one no-trump, then giving preference to spades, shows either a doubleton spade or three trumps with a dead minimum hand.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

One of my opponents held SPADES Q-J-3-2, HEARTS A-10-8-7-4, DIAMONDS Q-3, CLUBS 9-5. When his partner opened one club, he responded one heart, then passed the one-no-trump rebid. They missed their 4-4 spade fit (declarer was 4-3-3-3). Who is to blame?

–  Missing in Action, Wausau, Wis.

ANSWER: Curiously I blame no one. Opener concealed his spades at his second turn, perhaps because a one-spade rebid would have promised real clubs. Responder did not have the values to explore for a fit and was reluctant to repeat such feeble hearts. I might have had the same accident myself!

 


If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, e-mail him at bobbywolff@mindspring.com. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, November 5th, 2011

Dealer: East

Vul: North-South

North

J 9 3

10 9

K 7 6 4 3 2

K 5

West

K Q 6

K J 6 3 2

10 9

A 7 6

East

A 10 8 7 5 4

7

Q 8 5

Q 10 8

South

2

A Q 8 5 4

A J

J 9 4 3 2

 

South West North East
      2
3 All Pass    
       
       

Opening Lead: Spade King

“Ninety-nine percent of the people in the world are fools and the rest of us are in great danger of contagion.”


– Thornton Wilder

Today’s deal comes from the Manhattan Bridge Club heat of the New York sectional this summer. East-West were playing an announced hyperaggressive weak-two style where they opened five-card suits almost regardless of suit quality. Hence, West’s decision not to compete to three spades — though maybe if playing this style, East should have balanced with a double of three hearts.

 

Barry Rigal, playing with Jacqui Slifka, ruffed the second spade, led a club to the king, cashed the diamond ace and king, and led a low club from the board. East, caught napping, ducked and the jack forced West’s ace. That player got off lead with a third spade. (A club is probably a better play, but it does not work as the cards lie.)

 

Rigal ruffed, ruffed a club, and had reached a five-card ending where he needed three tricks to make his contract. He led a diamond from dummy, and when East followed suit, he knew that player’s precise shape, and therefore that West was down to five trumps. So he discarded a club, and West was forced to ruff his partner’s winner and lead a trump (thus extracting his partner’s last trump). Dummy’s 10 won the trick, and declarer led another diamond to pitch another club.

 

West was forced to ruff again and, as a final indignity, was now endplayed for a second time, conceding the last two trumps to declarer: contract made!


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

J 9 3
10 9
K 7 6 4 3 2
K 5

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
1 Pass 1 Pass
2 Pass 2 Pass
?      
ANSWER: Your partner’s sequence shows a strong hand, somewhere in the range of 16-18 with five clubs and four spades. He is looking for a heart stop or some other feature of your hand. My instinct would be to give delayed spade support with a two-spade bid. It is economical and gives your partner room to advance.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, November 4th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

Q 6 2

K J 3

K 7 6 5

10 7 3

West

J 8 4

9

J 10 3 2

K Q J 9 8

East

10 9 7 3

Q 10 7 5

Q 9

6 4 2

South

A K 5

A 8 6 4 2

A 8 4

A 5

 

South West North East
1 Pass 2 Pass
4 All Pass    
       
       

Opening Lead: Club King

“Titles are shadows, crowns are empty things,

The good of subjects is the end of kings.”


– Daniel Defoe

Today’s deal features a hand from the Dyspeptics Club. The foursome who make up the game play regularly in fixed partnerships, although it has never been clear to me why South puts up with North’s abuse, or indeed how East can tolerate the vagaries of his partner’s card-play.

 

Today’s deal is an example of how South’s inconsistent declarer-play could rouse his partner’s ire. Possessed of his usual rock-crusher, South wasted no time in the auction to reach a heart game with the minimum of investigation, and equally spent no time at all in the play of the hand, missing the entire point of the deal. He won the club lead and cashed the ace and king of hearts, loudly cursing his bad luck when trump failed to split.

 

North, having taken a quick peak at his opponents’ hands, was ready with his response that the only unlucky person at the table was himself — but that he deserved his bad luck for having agreed to play with South. Can you see what he meant?

 

With no danger of an adverse ruff, South should have directed his efforts to losing only one trump trick. By leading low to the heart king, then crossing back to hand with the spade king to lead up to dummy’s heart jack, South could have insured losing only one trump against any except the most hostile of breaks.

 

As the cards lay, this approach would have left South with a finesse against East’s 10-7 of trump on the third round.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

10 9 7 3
Q 10 7 5
Q 9
6 4 2

 

South West North East
  1 Dbl. 1
Pass 2 Dbl. Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: Your partner’s second double is for takeout, since one can never convert a takeout double to penalties — especially at a low level and when facing a passed partner. There is something to be said for bidding two hearts here, but introducing an unbid suit, spades, seems marginally wiser, despite the disparity in suit quality.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

Q J 10 5

K 9 3

A 10

8 7 5 2

 
West

7

Q 6

K Q J 5 4 3

K J 10 3

East

8 3 2

J 10 8 5 2

8 7 6 2

Q

  South

A K 9 6 4

A 7 4

9

A 9 6 4

 

 

South West North East
1 2 3 Pass
4 Pass 4 All Pass
       
       

 

Opening Lead: Diamond King

“Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men’s blood.”

 


– Daniel Hudson Burnham

Whenever you reach a game with trump to spare, one of your first thoughts should be whether to strip off the side-suits before tackling those side-suits where you would rather have your opponents making the initial lead than play them for yourself.

 

In today’s four-spade contract, things seem to be very straightforward. When dummy comes down on the lead of a top diamond, you appear to have one heart and two clubs to lose. Whenever things look straightforward, consider what might go wrong. It should not take you too long to realize that a 4-1 club break might sabotage your plan.

 

But once you spot the problem, you might find the solution is not too hard — as usual, thinking in advance will help save the day. Win the diamond lead and draw trump ending in dummy. Ruff the diamond loser, then play ace, king and a third heart. The best the defenders can do is to win and lead the club queen, and again you must resist the temptation to grab the ace. If you do, you will be left with three club losers. Instead, duck the club, and leave the opponents with a dilemma. If West leaves his partner on play, he must give you a ruff-sluff and one club loser has vanished. If he overtakes the club, you will lose only two club tricks, not three, since the opponents’ firepower has been fatally reduced.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

8 3 2
J 10 8 5 2
8 7 6 2
Q

 

South West North East
    2 Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: Don’t even think of passing! You could be cold for slam in any of three strains, so you must respond. Best is to bid three diamonds, which should be an artificial second negative. You would expect your partner to introduce a four-card major now if he has one, or to bid three no-trump if he is semibalanced. If you do not play this way, just bid three hearts and cross your fingers.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: Neither

North

A 9 8

J 6

Q 5 4

A Q 9 4 2

 
West

10 6 3

Q 10 5 4

K 8

J 7 6 3

East

K 7 4 2

9 8 3

J 10 7 6

K 10

  South

Q J 5

A K 7 2

A 9 3 2

8 5

 

 

South West North East
1 Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All Pass
       
       

 

Opening Lead: Heart Four

“My life closed twice before its close;

It yet remains to see

If Immortality unveil

A third event to me.”

 


– Emily Dickinson

It is rare to find both tables in a match exploiting the power of the closed hand (i.e., the idea that declarer can put pressure on his opponents by leading toward his hand and not toward the exposed holding in dummy). However, in a recent European Championship we were lucky enough to observe just that.

 

This hand cropped up in the match between France and Germany in the 1995 European Championship and is a nice example of good play by both declarer and the defense.

 

Against three no-trump Paul Chemla led a natural if unfortunate low heart, won by dummy’s jack, and it is worthwhile taking a few seconds to consider how one would proceed from here as declarer. Klaus Reps found the excellent shot of a low club from dummy, but Michel Perron played his club 10 in perfect tempo, which held the trick. Back came a second heart, and Reps won the heart ace, to play a second club. He took some time over his decision, but eventually played dummy’s queen (which would only be wrong if Perron had ducked from the doubleton K-10, as indeed he had). Now a third round of hearts left Reps without resource.

 

The contract and opening lead were the same at the other table in this match. The French declarer also found the low club lead from dummy at trick two, but the German defender rose with the king, and now declarer had no further problems.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

A 9 8
J 6
Q 5 4
A Q 9 4 2

 

South West North East
    1 1
2 Dbl. Pass Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: Your partner’s pass of the double of two hearts suggests a minimum hand, with no more than a moderate heart stop. Since you have denied four spades (or you would have made a negative double on the round before), it looks right to temporize with two spades now. If your partner has a heart stop, he will surely bid two no-trump next, and you can raise to game.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.