Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, October 21st, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: Both

North

A 10 7

Q 10 7 5 2

J 5 3 2

4

West

J 9 6 3

9 6 4 3

Q 9

K 5 2

East

K 8 4 2

A K J

K 10 8 6

J 3

South

Q 5

8

A 7 4

A Q 10 9 8 7 6

 

South West North East
1 Pass 1 Dbl.
2 2 Pass Pass
3 All Pass    
       

Opening Lead: Spade Three

“Do you set your face against the daughter

Of life? Can you never discard

Your curt pride’s ban?”


– D.H. Lawrence

In today’s deal East should act at once by doubling North’s one-heart call. It is generally safer to get into the auction at once than wait until the opponents have limited their values and shape.

 

When South hears the two-spade call on his left, he should compete to three clubs. With only four spades, West should not bid any further — it is up to East to continue if he has extra shape. As it is, East has no reason to take another call.

 

When West leads a low spade, the seven is played from dummy and East takes his king. South can see that his losers are one spade, one heart, two diamonds, and, almost for sure, at least one club. His only chance of avoiding one of these losers is to pick up a second trick in spades by throwing his queen under the king and taking a finesse against the jack. With this play, a diamond can be discarded from hand on the spade ace. The lie of the trumps is such that whether declarer finesses the queen or the 10, the ace will bring down the outstanding honor on the next round, so only one trump trick will be lost.

 

This hand is a slight variation on a deal from the Culbertson-Lenz rubber match. Sidney Lenz declared the deal in this fashion and found the unblock of the spade queen at the table. Just for the record, a red-suit lead defeats the contract.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

A 10 7
Q 10 7 5 2
J 5 3 2
4

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
1 Pass 3 Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: You have an awkward problem: if the clubs set up, you might make three no-trump. Equally, a partscore in clubs and a game in hearts are both perfectly plausible outcomes. The best way to explore for higher things is to bid three diamonds, but my bet would be that passing is the winner in the long run.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, October 20th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: North-South

North

K J 6 5

A K Q 8 7

J 7 5 3

West

7

10 3

A 9 8 6 3

K Q 8 6 4

East

Q 10 9 4 3

4

K 7 5 4

10 9 2

South

A 8 2

J 9 6 5 2

Q J 10 2

A

 

South West North East
1 2 NT 6 All Pass
       
       
       

Opening Lead: Club King

“It is not enough to have a good mind. The main thing is to use it well.”


– Rene Descartes

In today’s deal West’s two-no-trump overcall showed at least 5-5 in the minors. North’s jump to six hearts is the kind of bid I approve of — a fair shot on a hand where it would be impossible to find out scientifically whether slam, or even a grand, would be a good proposition. Plan the play on the lead of the club king.

 

There are two possible lines of play: one is a complete crossruff. For that to work, you will need both the spade ace and king to live, but West may well have started with a singleton spade. A better line is simply to play for West to have at least one of the outstanding diamond honors, surely nearly 100% on the bidding.

 

Win the club ace and cash the ace of trump. If West shows out, you can change tack and go for the complete crossruff line, starting by cashing the spade ace and king, then ruffing clubs in hand and diamonds in dummy.

 

However, if both opponents followed suit on the trump ace, play a heart to your jack and run the diamond queen, pitching a spade from the dummy. Ruff East’s club return and play the diamond jack, probably covered by West. Ruff in the dummy, come back to hand with a club ruff, and cash the diamond 10, discarding another spade from dummy. Now a spade to the king, a spade to the ace and a spade ruff in the dummy bring your trick total to 12.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

Q 10 9 4 3
4
K 7 5 4
10 9 2

 

South West North East
    2 2
?      
       
       
ANSWER: It is important for a partnership to agree if this hand is good enough for a two-spade call in competition (most would say no, but would bid two spades if the spade queen were the king). If not, which is weaker, double or pass? One can play it either way, but I believe more play double as a double negative, with pass showing moderate values. This hand would therefore qualify for a pass.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

Q 8

J 5 3

J 10 7

A J 9 8 7

West

J 10 9 7 4 2

8 2

K Q 8 5

5

East

6 5 3

Q 10 9 4

9 4

K 6 3 2

South

A K

A K 7 6

A 6 3 2

Q 10 4

 

South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 NT All Pass
       
       
       

Opening Lead: Spade Jack

“‘In my youth,’ Father William replied to his son,

‘I feared it might injure the brain;

But now that I’m perfectly sure I have none,

Why, I do it again and again.’”


– Lewis Carroll

Some themes crop up more frequently in the fevered imaginations of bridge writers than at the table. But that does not mean that those themes are not both valid and worthwhile — they are.

 

With that caveat, consider that you will need to play carefully today to guarantee three no-trump, although on the face of it you have tricks to spare, one way or another.

 

I suspect if the deal were played in the local club, the defenders would lead spades, and declarer would win and play on clubs, with East taking the first or second round to return a spade. South would emerge with nine winners and might well think that the defenders had found the best lead and continuation. True enough, but consider what might happen if East had restrained himself sufficiently to duck both the first and second clubs. Now declarer would have three club tricks not four, and with the spade blockage, would have no re-entry to dummy.

 

So what is declarer to do? Answer: when the club queen and 10 hold the trick, with West discarding on the second round, South leads his third club to dummy’s ace, then plays the fourth club, discarding his spade king! Now the opponents must give him an entry to dummy if they continue the attack on spades. Equally, a shift to either hearts or diamonds merely puts off the evil day when one of dummy’s red jacks will provide an entry to the board.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

Q 8
J 5 3
J 10 7
A J 9 8 7

 

South West North East
Pass 1 2 Dbl.
?      
       
       
ANSWER: You have enough to raise hearts pre-emptively, but since you expect to be defending a spade game, wouldn’t you like to get partner off to a club lead? The best way to do that is to bid three clubs now. As a passed hand, you can’t be rescuing partner from his long suit before anyone has passed for penalties. This is a fit-showing call, indicating heart tolerance and a desire for a club lead.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

A J 8 7

9 5 3

A 9 4

A J 5

West

K J 4

7 6 3 2

K Q 10 9 7 4

East

10 9 6 3

10 8 7 2

10 8

8 6 3

South

K Q 5 4 2

A Q 6

K Q J 5

2

 

South West North East
1 2 3 Pass
3 Pass 4 Pass
4 Pass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 6 All Pass

Opening Lead: Club King

“Be calm? And was I frantic?

You’ll have me laughing soon.

I’m calm as this Atlantic,

And quiet as the moon…”


– Edwin Arlington Robinson

Emotion at the bridge table is the great equalizer. When we think we have done well or badly, we often lose focus.

 

When today’s deal came up in a match between two decent teams, both tables bid competently to six spades. West led a high club which South won in dummy. His first thought was that his side might have missed the grand slam. He then took his eye off the ball by playing a trump to the king. When the 4-0 break came to light, he could see that he had no realistic chance to establish more than five trump tricks, so he drew trump and cashed three rounds of diamonds, ending in dummy. Then he took the heart finesse and conceded down one when West won and exited with a high club.

 

In the other room declarer also received a club lead against six spades. He made the critical play at trick two of ruffing a club in hand, then played the spade king and a spade to dummy, ruffed another club, played the spade queen from hand, then went to the diamond ace to draw the last trump, pitching a heart loser. Now he simply ran the diamonds and conceded trick 13 to the heart king.

 

Readers may try to make the slam by doing anything other than ruffing a club at trick two. But please don’t try too hard — it cannot be done.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K Q 5 4 2
A Q 6
K Q J 5
2

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
?      
       
       
ANSWER: If you play weak jump responses, you will have to bid one spade and muddle through thereafter. If you play strong jump responses, you can bid two spades, then raise diamonds at your next turn to show your slam potential, good fit, and your own good suit all at one go.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, October 17th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: Neither

North

K Q 6

A K Q 5

Q 10 9 4 2

Q

West

3

4 2

A K 6 5

K 10 7 6 3 2

East

A 10 8 7 4

7 6

J 8 7

A 5 4

South

J 9 5 2

J 10 9 8 3

3

J 9 8

 

South West North East
Pass 1 Dbl. 1
2 Pass 4 All Pass
       
       

Opening Lead: Diamond King

“Half the world knows not how the other half lives.”


– George Herbert

The old-fashioned textbooks tell you to lead king from ace-king, which on rare occasions leads to confusion between an ace-king and a king-queen combination. Accordingly, a modern idea (from merely 30 years ago!) is that you normally play ace from ace-king. This method is not foolproof either, since sometimes one leads an unsupported ace; but at least when you lead a king, you have either a doubleton ace-king, or a side-suit singleton.

 

In this deal from the Cavendish Pairs, the defenders can get the maximum against four hearts by collecting two ruffs. However, at one table, Bart Bramley (West) led the diamond king and shifted to the spade three. The message was not all that clear, since the partnership’s normal lead from ace-king was the king. South did the best that he could — trying to make up for his exuberance in the auction — by putting up the spade queen from dummy and concealing the spade two in hand by following with the five.

 

At this point East was not sure whether to try to give his partner a spade ruff at once. He took out insurance by cashing the club ace first to see whether he should instead try to score his partner’s diamond ace. Now Bramley carefully followed with the club king under the ace — suit preference for spades — to make his partner’s life easier and to ensure he got his ruff. Thoughtful defense.


LEAD WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

Q 9 7 6
10 6
J 8 5 3 2
9 7

 

South West North East
    1 Dbl.
Pass 2 Pass 2 NT
Pass 3 NT Dbl. All Pass
       
ANSWER: Your own hand tells you partner is not doubling on power. He must be doubling for a lead, and he knows you would have led a heart without the final double. Therefore, this sequence calls for an unusual lead, and it looks logical for it to be dummy’s suit. So lead the club nine.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, October 16th, 2011

Dear Mr. Wolff:

What is the right way to signal when your partner leads a king (presumably from ace-king) and dummy has the guarded queen in that suit?

–  Counterbalance, Newport News, Va.

ANSWER: At a suit contract, if you hold a doubleton, you echo (high-low). If you have more, give count, with a high card suggesting an even number, and a low card suggesting an odd number. At no-trump I’d simply give count.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

What would you do with SPADES A-Q-7-3-2, HEARTS K-10-3-2, DIAMONDS 10-4 CLUBS J-9, when your partner opens one diamond and rebids one no-trump over your one-spade response? Would you try for game, or settle for a partscore?

–  Max Headroom, San Antonio, Texas

ANSWER: Your hand does not look strong enough to try for game. (You have at best an eight-card fit in either major, and no more than 24 HCP.) I’d bid two hearts now, intending it as less than invitational values. With a better hand I’d start with two clubs, the New Minor, as a forcing relay.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

How should opener rebid when he opens a suit, his LHO overcalls, after which partner makes a negative double. Are jumps forcing — and if not, what about a double jump?

–  Dick Diver, West Palm Beach, Fla.

  ANSWER: Let’s look at a minor-suit opening, a one heart overcall, and a negative double. Now your one-spade call suggests four and a dead minimum, or three spades in a balanced or semi-balanced hand without a heart stop. A jump to two spades suggests four spades and 14-15 points — potentially unbalanced. A jump to three spades is an unbalanced hand with 16 or 17 points and four spades, strongly invitational but not forcing.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

In fourth seat how should I have developed the following hand: SPADES J-9-3-2, HEARTS A-K-4, DIAMONDS K-9, CLUBS Q-10-4-2 when my LHO opened two spades and my partner doubled? This was a team event with both sides vulnerable.

–  Leading Edge, Edmonton, Alberta

ANSWER: The choice is to bid three no-trump or pass for penalties. A club partscore has no attractions. I’m guessing we rate to set two spades doubled for 500. If declarer can take six spade tricks because dummy has a high spade honor and partner a singleton, maybe there won’t be any other high cards in dummy. Since game rates to be hard to make, I’d gamble a pass unless my LHO is known to be very sound.

Dear Mr. Wolff:

Is there any real advantage to playing the version of keycard Blackwood currently recommended by Eddie Kantar, where a five-club response shows one or four keycards (counting the trump king as a keycard) and five diamonds shows none or three?

–  New Business, Durango, Colo.

ANSWER: The most important thing is to play a system both players know well. Accidentally forgetting part of your system will more than outweigh the minute gains of playing the very best possible methods. I’d say stick with what you know — and if that is old-fashioned, I’ve been called worse than that.

 


If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, e-mail him at bobbywolff@mindspring.com. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, October 15th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: North-South

North

J 5

J 4

Q 8 4

A 9 8 6 4 2

West

10 8 7 6 3

8 7 2

A J 5 2

3

East

K

K Q 6 5 3

10 9 7

Q J 7 5

South

A Q 9 4 2

A 10 9

K 6 3

K 10

 

South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All Pass
       
       
       

Opening Lead: Spade Six

“The golden rule is to help those we love to escape from us; and never try to begin to help people, or influence them till they ask, but wait for them.”


– Friedrich von Huegel

In this deal from the IMP Pairs at the world championships in Philadelphia last year, Steve Hamaoui played three no-trump against the lead of the spade six, to the five, king and ace. Hamaoui cashed the club king and ran the club 10 to East, as West pitched a heart. East took the trick and played the heart king, ducked by Hamaoui, who played the heart jack from dummy, unblocking. East might have done better to switch to the diamond 10, but he persisted in hearts. Hamaoui took the heart 10 and cashed the ace, as West discarded a diamond.

 

Now Hamaoui played a low diamond from hand, winning the queen in dummy. He played off the club ace, and West was caught. Discarding the diamond jack would have let declarer make an overtrick. But if West discarded a spade, Hamaoui could still cash the spade and play a diamond. West would win the two diamond tricks but would still be endplayed in the spade suit, giving Hamaoui enough spade winners for his contract.

 

Curiously, the key defensive maneuver was for West to play the diamond jack on the first lead of the suit. If he had done so, declarer would not have been able to come up with the endplay he found. Declarer could not overtake the spade jack without conceding the setting tricks, and if he cashed the spade jack and led a diamond, East’s 10-9 would assure that he would gain the lead sooner or later to cash the setting tricks.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K
K Q 6 5 3
10 9 7
Q J 7 5

 

South West North East
      1
1 Dbl. 1 Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: Your partner’s one-spade bid should be constructive but nonforcing in competition. (Had West passed over one heart, the call is most commonly played as forcing by an unpassed hand.) Your lack of spade fit and decent club guard suggests a bid of one no-trump is the most practical action now.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, October 14th, 2011

Dealer: South

Vul: East-West

North

K J 10 8 2

J 7

A 9

J 8 6 5

West

9 6 3

K Q 9 3

10 8 6 5

10 7

East

Q 5

10 8 4

K Q 4 2

K 4 3 2

South

A 7 4

A 6 5 2

J 7 3

A Q 9

 

South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 3 NT All Pass
       
       

Opening Lead: Heart Three

“I saw the Night caught, as by wizard’s spell,

In the red meshes of the setting sun…”


– H. Duncan Hall

In this deal from the Mixed Pairs final last year in Philadelphia, Neil Rosen of England rejected the 5-3 spade fit and played three no-trump instead. He was off to a good start when West led the heart three to dummy’s jack. When a club to the queen saw West’s seven appear, declarer could infer that it might well be from club 10-7. A spade to dummy’s jack saw East win with the queen. Declarer ducked the heart return and took the next heart, discarding dummy’s diamond nine. He then ran the spade suit, and East came under unbearable pressure.

 

If he parted with a club, declarer would play the jack, pinning West’s 10, then cash another club winner and go back to dummy with a diamond to score the club eight.

 

So East discarded the diamond queen, but now declarer could run the club jack, then cash the diamond ace and cross to hand with the club ace for a magnificent plus 660.

 

Incidentally, once declarer has ducked a heart, East can break up the ending by switching to the diamond king. However, if declarer takes the heart ace at once and cashes his spades, East will have to part with his last heart and two diamonds. Now, if declarer reads the position, he can run the club jack, ducked by East. Then he plays the diamond ace and a diamond, scoring the last two tricks with the club ace and the diamond jack.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

K J 10 8 2
J 7
A 9
J 8 6 5

 

South West North East
    1 Pass
1 Pass 1 NT Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: You have no real interest in game, facing a balanced hand that can’t raise spades, so the only issue is whether to play spades or no-trump. If you play, as I do, that your partner can raise with three spades in a semi-balanced hand, it looks clear to pass. Your partner might have a singleton spade and won’t often have three. Meanwhile, you have enough high cards for one no-trump to look safe.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, October 13th, 2011

Dealer: East

Vul: Both

North

9 7 5

10 7 5 4

A 8

K J 10 4

West

K Q J 4 3

K Q 7 3

Q 9 8 5

East

10

K J 3

J 10 6 5

A 7 6 3 2

South

A 8 6 2

A Q 9 8 6 2

9 4 2

 

South West North East
      Pass
1 1 2 Pass
4 Pass Pass Dbl.
All Pass      

Opening Lead: Spade King

“In a dark time, the eye begins to see.”


– Theodore Roethke

In today’s deal from the Philadelphia world championships last year, two talented female players were in a delicate game contract — one that required not only a good view or two, but some help from the defense.

 

At both tables, against four hearts doubled, West unluckily led the spade king, squashing her partner’s 10. At the first table, declarer, Sheri Winestock, won with her ace and played a diamond to dummy’s ace. The next trick went heart four, three, two, and a discard, a play that ties a record. Declarer drew trump with the aid of another finesse, then conceded two spades and one diamond.

 

Note, though, that as the play went, if East had been less frugal with his hearts, playing the jack or king at trick three, he would have defeated the contract. Declarer would have won and played a second diamond, but West could have won, cashed two spades, and given East a spade ruff.

 

At our second table West also led the spade king against four hearts doubled. Heather Bakhshi also won the ace and led a low diamond, but here, when West instinctively followed low, Bakhshi made the key play of dummy’s eight, ducking it into the hand that could not cash the spade winners before she was ready. East won and returned a diamond to dummy’s ace. Bakhshi led the heart 10 and ran it, and now could pick up the trumps without loss, ruff a diamond in dummy, and concede just two spade tricks for a tremendous plus 790.


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

9 7 5
10 7 5 4
A 8
K J 10 4

 

South West North East
    1 Dbl.
?      
       
       
ANSWER: Your hand falls inconveniently between a pre-emptive raise and a limit raise. It is not really that close to either action, is it? Some people deal with this problem by setting aside a two-club call in this sequence as artificial, suggesting a constructive spade raise, though that is typically a three-trump raise. Others use a jump in the other major to show four trumps and 6-9 HCP, which would be ideal here.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

Dealer: East

Vul: East-West

North

K J 8 5 4

Q 9 7

Q 9 8 3

9

West

10 7 2

A 8 2

10 7 6 2

10 3 2

East

Q 6

J 10 6 5 4

J 4

A Q J 6

South

A 9 3

K 3

A K 5

K 8 7 5 4

 

South West North East
      Pass
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 2 NT Pass
4 All Pass    

Opening Lead: Heart Two

“What is written without effort is in general read without pleasure.”


– Samuel Johnson

This deal was played in round eight of the Rosenblum qualifying stage in Philadelphia last year. Fredrik Nystrom of Sweden was happy to report his teammates’ defensive effort against a Chilean team.

 

At one table, South played four spades, wrapping up 10 tricks on a trump lead.

 

At the other table, South was also declarer in the same contract, but he had to deal with a much more challenging defense by Peter Fredin (West) and Bjorn Fallenius.

 

Fredin started with a low heart to the seven, 10, and king. Declarer fired a heart right back, and Fredin smoothly played his eight. Declarer inserted dummy’s nine, losing to the jack.

 

The deception continued when Fallenius put the club queen on the table, ducked by declarer. A third round of hearts was ruffed by declarer, who then played the spade ace and a spade to the jack. Fallenius won and played a fourth round of hearts.

 

Fredin didn’t want to give away the show by discarding a club, so he ruffed with the 10, overruffed in dummy.

 

Declarer now played a diamond to his ace and ruffed a club. On the second round of diamonds, Fallenius played the jack, won by declarer’s king. Declarer now had a finessing position against Fredin’s remaining diamonds, the 10-7, but he was convinced that West’s last two cards were a low diamond and the club ace. Accordingly, he played a diamond from hand and went up with dummy’s queen.

 

I would have loved to be a fly on the wall to see declarer’s reaction!


BID WITH THE ACES

South Holds:

Q 6
J 10 6 5 4
J 4
A Q J 6

 

South West North East
      1
1 Pass 1 Pass
?      
       
ANSWER: It is a good general rule that one should not worry about bidding no-trump with an unguarded suit, unless or until you have been put on notice that the suit is dangerous. Here no opponent has bid diamonds. If one had, you’d steer clear of no-trump, of course. East has bid clubs, and you have that suit under control, so rebid one no-trump now.

 


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2011. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.