Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, September 2nd, 2016

A billion neutrinos go swimming: one gets wet.

Michael Kamakana


S North
None ♠ A K 10 8 4 3
 A 3
 K Q
♣ Q J 6
West East
♠ J 9 7
 J 9 8 7
 J 10 3
♣ 10 4 3
♠ Q
 5 4 2
 8 7 5 2
♣ A 8 7 5 2
South
♠ 6 5 2
 K Q 10 6
 A 9 6 4
♣ K 9
South West North East
1 NT* Pass 2 Pass
2 ♠ Pass 5 NT** Pass
6 NT All pass    

*12-14

**Choice of slams

J

In today’s deal North-South did well to reach six no-trump, a better contract than six spades, since if both red suits behave, it can be made with only two spade tricks. And at pairs, it would also be more rewarding if it came home.

Declarer won West’s top diamond lead in dummy, then cashed the spade ace, and when East’s queen dropped, he played a club from dummy. East (worried declarer had the spade jack and that he was trying to steal his 13th trick) went in with the ace and continued with another diamond.

Declarer won the diamond in dummy, played a club back to his king, and cashed the diamond ace and nine, West discarding a club. Now the percentage play in spades is to take the finesse (following the principle of restricted choice, which argues that if East had a singleton honor he would have had no choice which card to play, whereas if he had the queen-jack doubleton he would have had a choice).

But declarer instead cashed the spade king, East discarding a club, followed by the club queen, on which West was forced to discard a heart. At this point declarer knew that each defender had three hearts left so he could play hearts from the top and make 12 tricks.

In retrospect it is curious that if West had unguarded his hearts on the fourth diamond, declarer might well have had more trouble reading the ending. By discarding his third club prematurely, he exposed the full count on the hand.


Whether your partner has four hearts, or three hearts in an unbalanced hand, it seems to me that four hearts rates to be the best game. The point is that if partner has only three hearts he will be short in spades or diamonds, and four hearts may well therefore be a better spot, even in a 4-3 fit.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 6 5 2
 K Q 10 6
 A 9 6 4
♣ K 9
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♣ Pass
1 Pass 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, September 1st, 2016

Don’t kid about Safety; you may be the goat.

Illinois Steel Company


W North
E-W ♠ A 9 8 7
 A J 9 3
 K Q 6
♣ A J
West East
♠ 10 6 5 4 2
 5
 —
♣ 10 9 8 6 5 3 2
♠ K J 3
 7 6 4 2
 J 10 7 2
♣ K Q
South
♠ Q
 K Q 10 8
 A 9 8 5 4 3
♣ 7 4
South West North East
  Pass 1 Pass
1 2 NT* 4 Pass
4 NT Pass 5 ♣ Pass
6 All pass    

*Black suits

♣10

Against six hearts West led the club 10, taken with dummy’s ace. Declarer, who had received the warning signal in the auction that one or both red suits might be breaking badly, decided not to go for overtricks by ruffing spades in hand. Instead he drew two rounds of trump by playing to the eight, then leading the queen to the ace.

On discovering the 4-1 heart division, he realized he could not overcome a 4-0 diamond break if it was West who had the diamond length. However, he saw that he could succeed when it was East who had four diamonds, by playing on diamonds before drawing any more trump. So he cashed the diamond king.

If both defenders had followed to the diamond, declarer would simply have drawn the remaining trump and claimed 12 tricks; six diamonds, four trumps and the two black aces.

However, when West discarded on the first round of diamonds, declarer continued by playing the diamond queen and ace, then ruffing the diamonds good. After drawing the remaining trump with his king and queen, declarer had his 12 tricks.

Nicely played by declarer, and no doubt he might well have followed this line even without the opponents’ bidding, but I wonder if West’s intervention was well judged. After all, he had a virtual Yarborough, his partner was a passed hand, and the vulnerability was as unattractive as possible. Sometimes you have to pick between clichés: silence is golden, and loose lips sink ships.


You could bid either red suit, and commit the hand to one suit or the other. But on a bad day partner may have either a doubleton diamond, or just three hearts, so if you do take a unilateral decision you’d better guess well. A better alternative is to bid four no-trump to show a two-suiter, planning to convert five clubs to five diamonds to show the red suits. Then partner takes the final decision.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q
 K Q 10 8
 A 9 8 5 4 3
♣ 7 4
South West North East
Pass 1 ♠ Dbl. 4 ♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, August 31st, 2016

Rome is the city of echoes, the city of illusions, and the city of yearning.

Giotto di Bondone


S North
Both ♠ A 7 6 4 3
 6 3
 Q 7 4
♣ K 5 2
West East
♠ Q 8 5 2
 J
 J
♣ A J 10 9 8 6 3
♠ K J 10
 10 7 5
 K 10 9 6 2
♣ 7 4
South
♠ 9
 A K Q 9 8 4 2
 A 8 5 3
♣ Q
South West North East
1 3 ♣ Dbl. Pass
4 All pass    

♠2

Over the last 20 years Alfredo Versace of Italy and his partner Lorenzo Lauria have taken their places in the very top echelons of Italian world champions. Last summer in the warm-up for the Spingold Knockout Teams, Versace encountered this neat play problem, and found an elegant solution.

Against four hearts West led the spade two. Versace made the critical move when he won the spade ace and ruffed a spade. East followed with the 10 and king, and Versace then drew trump in three rounds (West having the singleton jack). Now he led a diamond, perhaps intending to put in the seven, had West followed with a small card. In fact, though, the trick went to the jack, queen and king.

East now had to shift to the club seven. This went round to West’s ace, and back came a third spade. Versace ruffed, then led a diamond to dummy’s seven as West discarded. In the four-card ending, East had been stripped of his major-suit cards, and was down to one club and the 1-0-6-4 of diamonds. Whatever he led next, he had to concede the rest, one way or another. As you can see, the spade ruff at trick two was essential to remove East’s exit card in this position.

Of course, not every story has a happy ending. Versace’s +620 held the loss on the board to five IMPs. His teammates at the other table had saved in five clubs and had been doubled to go minus 800 after the defense found the spade ruff.


The jump to four diamonds is a splinter raise. It shows short diamonds and the values for a raise to game in spades. You have enough to cooperate for slam, and the best way forward is to cuebid five clubs, denying a heart control and suggesting approximately these values. Let partner move on with heart control and a suitable hand.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 7 6 4 3
 6 3
 Q 7 4
♣ K 5 2
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♣ Pass
1 ♠ Pass 4 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

Evil is easy and has infinite forms.

Blaise Pascal


N North
Both ♠ Q 3
 A 6
 A K 10 8 7 3
♣ 8 7 3
West East
♠ A 10 8 6 2
 J 9 7 2
 4
♣ K 9 5
♠ J 9 4
 Q 8 4
 J 6 5 2
♣ J 10 4
South
♠ K 7 5
 K 10 5 3
 Q 9
♣ A Q 6 2
South West North East
    1 Pass
1 Pass 2 Pass
3 NT All pass    

♠6

In today’s deal the route to three no-trump looks too easy. There must be a catch here… right?

When South responds one heart to his partner’s opening, North rebids his long suit. Now South, with a full opening bid and stoppers in all the unbid suits, can bid game in no-trump; no other contract looks appealing, and slam is a long way away.

After a small spade lead by West, South puts up dummy’s spade queen at the first trick because the queen may win a trick now, but can never win a trick later. (If dummy had queen-third of spades you would duck, naturally, to preserve your second spade trick if West had led from the ace.)

As it happens, the queen holds the trick, and South knows that West has led from a long suit headed by the ace. It is now necessary to develop the long diamonds without allowing East on lead. If that happened, East would continue the attack on spades, and West would then defeat the contract by running his suit.

Once you see the problem, the solution is relatively easy. At trick two you should lead a low diamond from dummy and finesse the nine. If this finesse should lose, the rest of the suit would be good, and West could do no harm.

As it happens, the finesse wins. The rest of the suit is good, and South is off to the races. If South had played the diamonds from the top, he would have lost a trick to East’s jack, and the spades would then defeat him.


Your partner’s pass of one diamond redoubled when ‘under’ as opposed to ‘over’ the trumps, should not suggest playing there. It indicates that he has no clear call, (otherwise he would have acted already) and asks you to run to your cheapest real suit. Bid one heart and take it from there. Contrast this position with where you reopen with a double, where your partner’s pass of a redouble would be to play.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 7 5
 K 10 5 3
 Q 9
♣ A Q 6 2
South West North East
    Pass 1
Dbl. Rdbl. Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, August 29th, 2016

There’s nothing like being used to a thing.

Richard Sheridan


S North
None ♠ Q 5
 10 6 5 3
 A 7 5 4
♣ Q 9 3
West East
♠ J 10 9 8 2
 J 4
 Q 10 8 2
♣ 5 4
♠ K 7 4
 Q 9 7 2
 J 6
♣ K 8 7 6
South
♠ A 6 3
 A K 8
 K 9 3
♣ A J 10 2
South West North East
1 ♣ Pass 1 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
       

♠J

It is important to understand how South can describe a strong balanced hand by his first two calls. With 15 to 17 points, South can open one no-trump, whereas with 20 to 22 points, South would open with two no-trump.

However, with in-between hands, in the range of 18 to 19 points, the solution is to open one of a suit, then jump rebid at notrump. North can raise to three no-trump, since he has eight points in high cards, which should be more than enough for game.

When dummy comes down, South sees he needs four club tricks to make his game. He can only do so if East has the club king. Moreover, since there is only one entry to dummy, South must manage to take all of the necessary club finesses without wasting entries.

Best is to begin clubs by leading the nine from dummy. When it holds the trick, the queen can be led next. Once this also holds the trick, a third club finesse can be taken, and the contract can be brought home.

It would be wrong to lead the club queen first. If South drops the small club under dummy’s queen, he must win the second club in his own hand, and then cannot return to dummy for the third club finesse.

It would be no better to lead the queen and contribute the 10 under it. East would duck the first club, then cover the club nine with the king. This leaves South with a losing club for the fourth round of the suit.


The question here is whether to lead a diamond, trusting your RHO to have hearts under control, or to lead your long suit. I go for the heart lead – since even if East has the aceking of hearts, a heart lead may still serve to help set this suit up for the defense.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 7 6 5
 Q 8 3 2
 9 8 2
♣ 7 4
South West North East
  1 ♠ Dbl. Rdbl.
2 Pass Pass 3 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, August 28th, 2016

I have always played that to respond to partner’s opening bid at the two level, in a new suit, requires at least 10 points or invitational values in high-cards. Last night we played against a very experienced and successful player, who claims you can respond at the two level with six or more points. Has there been a change in recent years on this rule?

Valued Client, Hartford, Conn.

You are right and your expert wrong. Of course 10 points is a moveable feast; some 10-counts are not worth the action, some nine-counts are worth an invitation. It just goes to show we should all use common-sense and not count beans! The fact remains that weaker hands without a fit and a biddable suit at the one level should typically bid one no-trump.

In response to a one no-trump call you recently showed a sequence in which responder bid two spades with only one spade and six clubs. Is this a convention of which I have never heard?

Pat-A-Cake, Cleveland, Ohio

I sometimes forget to alert transfer responses in the column. Two diamond and two heart responses to one no-trump are Jacoby Transfers showing the suit above. And one can similarly use two further calls to show diamonds and clubs. One sensible way is to use two spades for clubs, and three clubs for diamonds, while keeping two no-trump as natural. Responder’s continuations at his next turn are to show shortness, since all good hands with a four-card major and a minor plus forcing values start with Stayman.

At unfavorable vulnerability you hear RHO open a strong no-trump. You hold ♠ J-10-5-4, K-Q-9-6-4, Q-2, ♣ 6-2. Your partnership agreements provide for showing either the heart suit, or both majors. Does your hand have enough playing strength to justify acting? If not how much more would you need, and would you favor showing just the five-card heart suit, or showing both majors?

Fire when Ready, Sunbury, Pa.

I could imagine balancing over a no-trump if non-vulnerable, so long as I was a passed hand. As it is, though, I’d not bid at this vulnerability unless I had the spade ace instead of the four. And I would definitely act to show both majors when 5-4, no matter what the suit disparity.

Can you comment on the method of defensive signaling defined as ‘obvious shift’? Is it a good idea to use these methods or at least to have them in one’s quiver for possible use?

Asking for the Stars, Bristol, Va.

The idea is that discouraging the opening lead will likely see partner shift to dummy’s obvious weak suit, or the suit that the auction makes most logical. Equally, when you encourage the opening lead (assuming that continuing the attack on that suit won’t cost a trick) you can prevent partner from switching to a suit that you know will cost a trick. I like the approach in moderation – but not as a philosophy of life.

It occurred to me while watching the Masters Golf championship that bridge and golf are often sports that go in pairs. Are there any serious bridge players who are outstanding golfers, and any top golfers who play a decent game of bridge?

Double Duty, Kansas City, Mo.

Jesper Parnevik has some decent bridge skills, and Zia Mahmood is a keen if not proficient golfer. Jeff Meckstroth harbored thoughts of playing golf professionally while at college, though his back might prevent him these days. Norberto Bocchi is also a fine golfer.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, August 27th, 2016

Somewhere in the world there is an epigram for every dilemma.

Henrik Willem van Loon


S North
N-S ♠ Q 10 4
 A 10 8 2
 K Q 8 3
♣ K Q
West East
♠ K 6 5 3
 Q 9
 7 2
♣ 10 9 8 4 2
♠ J 9 8 2
 J 6 5 4
 9 5
♣ J 7 5
South
♠ A 7
 K 7 3
 A J 10 6 4
♣ A 6 3
South West North East
1 NT Pass 4 NT* Pass
6 All pass    

*Quantitative

7

At the table, in six diamonds on a trump lead, declarer drew trump and led ace and another spade, hoping to guess the suit. This was essentially a 50% line, and it failed when he put in the 10. Can you do better?

One improvement is to play a low spade up after drawing trump, planning to put in the 10 if West ducks smoothly. Even if you misguess, you may recover with a major-suit squeeze. This comes to roughly a two-thirds chance.

Another approach is to go after hearts. Lead low to the ace, low to the king and then play a third heart. This works when hearts break or East has a singleton or doubleton honor, or when West has some specific doubletons. But if hearts don’t behave, you have virtually no chance. This line comes in at sixty percent. Granted, if you prefer to back your judgment after two top hearts to go after spades, you may survive a 4-2 heart break.

But on balance I prefer drawing trump, cashing off the clubs, then leading to the heart ace and playing a heart back to the seven. If hearts are 3-3 you are home, and if West has a singleton honor, honor-fourth or four low cards, you have the 12th trick. And you still have a chance if West has either a doubleton honor or doubleton heart nine. He must win the second heart and then lead spades for you – giving you the contract half of the rest of the time. The combined chances amount to close to 70 percent.


This sequence should be played as game-forcing with long clubs, suggesting a side four-card major, in this case spades of course. Your partner should have doubt about strain or level, but since you have the other two suits well guarded, and no extra values or real black-suit fit, just bid three no-trump. Let partner go past three no-trump if he wants to, but don’t encourage him to do so.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 10 4
 A 10 8 2
 K Q 8 3
♣ K Q
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 ♣ Pass
2 Pass 3 ♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, August 26th, 2016

I have come too late into a world too old.

Alfred de Musset


E North
None ♠ 7 4 3
 A 8 6 2
 J 6 2
♣ Q 10 4
West East
♠ A K 9 8 5 2
 10 9 4 3
 7 5
♣ 2
♠ Q J 10
 K Q J 7
 K 8 3
♣ K J 8
South
♠ 6
 5
 A Q 10 9 4
♣ A 9 7 6 5 3
South West North East
      1 NT
2 NT 4 ♠ 4 NT Pass
5 ♣ Pass Pass Dbl.
All pass      

♠K

To say that South had been given a complete blueprint of the deal below in his contract of five clubs would be only a slight exaggeration. After the bidding and the play to the first trick, he could pinpoint every high card in the defenders’ hands. The good news is he was given the opportunity for a rather unusual play; the bad news is that he thought of it too late.

Against five clubs doubled West led the spade ace to the three, queen and six, then rather woodenly led another spade. As it turns out, a heart switch would have been more purposeful. South ruffed and led a trump to the two, 10 and jack. East returned a heart to dummy’s ace and, although the finesses against both of East’s kings were right, there was only one entry to the table. East was able to cover whatever card was led from dummy, and wait for the setting trick in the other minor.

Can you spot the winning line? If you place East with every missing honor card, then declarer should start trump by the highly unusual maneuver of leading the nine from his hand. East can win with the jack and lead a heart, but the difference now is that declarer can make his second play in trumps the lead of a club honor from dummy. Whether East covers or not, there will remain a vital entry on the table to lead the diamond jack, and avoid a loser in that suit.


Normally with a weak hand and four trump facing an overcall, you should raise to the three level, preemptively. You can cuebid with a high-card limit raise in this seat. But here your balanced hand argues for a simple raise. That should suffice: there is no need to do any more than that, since your hand is so defensive in nature.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 7 4 3
 A 8 6 2
 J 6 2
♣ Q 10 4
South West North East
  1 ♣ 1 Dbl.
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Even Homer nods.

Horace


S North
Both ♠ 7 5
 6 5 4
 A 8 7
♣ Q J 9 8 7
West East
♠ Q 9
 J 9 8 3
 K Q J 5 4
♣ 4 3
♠ J 10 8 6 2
 Q 10 2
 6 2
♣ K 6 5
South
♠ A K 4 3
 A K 7
 10 9 3
♣ A 10 2
South West North East
1 ♣ Pass 2 ♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

K

At the Dyspeptics Club it might be grudgingly accepted by South and West that their partners might be technically superior players, but they would never gratify them by admitting that to their face.

However on today’s deal South struck a blow to establish his bona fides by a neat line of play, which gave the defense a chance to go wrong.

In theory West found the way to hold declarer to eight tricks in three notrump, and continuing with another high diamond. This appeared to limit declarer to three club tricks, unless East had the singleton or doubleton club king.

But South found a way to present the defenders with a losing option when he won the second diamond, and ran the club queen, then the nine. Next he crossed to the club ace as West discarded the spade nine, before exiting in diamonds.

Now West embarrassed his partner by cashing all the diamonds, reducing everyone to five cards. What was East to keep? He had come down to three cards in each major, and had to decide which suit to unguard. Seduced by his partner’s earlier high spade discard, he pitched a spade, and South scored the last five tricks with three spades and two hearts.

Was East’s play a mistake? Yes I think so, since West would surely have discarded a small heart from an original holding of three or four small cards or even from jack-third of hearts. His failure to pitch a heart suggested he was holding on to jack-fourth of hearts.


This may be only a seven-count, but the combination of the fifth trump and the side ace is just enough to raise to three clubs. This is partly because your hand falls, barely, into invitational territory, but also because it makes it far harder for the opponents to get their act together and compete in a red suit.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 7 5
 6 5 4
 A 8 7
♣ Q J 9 8 7
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 2 ♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.

Yogi Berra


W North
Both ♠ 10 2
 K 7
 A 5 2
♣ A Q 10 9 5 3
West East
♠ K J 9 5
 8 6 4 3
 10 7 6
♣ 7 6
♠ A 7 4
 A J 9
 Q 9 8 3
♣ 8 4 2
South
♠ Q 8 6 3
 Q 10 5 2
 K J 4
♣ K J
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♣ Pass
1 Pass 2 ♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

♠5

Against three no-trump East takes the first spade with the ace and returns the spade seven. Declarer follows small from hand and West’s jack captures dummy’s 10.

Now West knows he can take two more spades if he can put East in to return a third diamond. But East’s play of a high spade at trick two suggests an original three-card holding – so South would still have a spade guard left if West leads out the suit from the top. East would return a low spade at trick two if he had three spades left.

Since West knows South has about a 12-count at minimum there is room for East to hold one significant card. If East has the club king, he will surely win a trick with that, since declarer cannot come to nine tricks without establishing the club suit. So the question is when it matters which red suit to play.

The simple answer is that the sight of the diamond ace in dummy means it must be right to play a heart. Even if East has a diamond suit that included the king, a diamond shift now wouldn’t help – declarer would have three red-suit winners and six clubs. But as the cards lie, playing a high heart now lets East win and revert to spades, for the defenders to cash out their five winners.

Had dummy held the heart ace and diamond king, West would have shifted to a high diamond, using similar reasoning to hope to find East with the diamond ace (or club king).


Do you think your partner was preempted out of bidding his suit? Of course you don’t – and neither do I! If he chose not to bid over the redouble, it must be because he wanted to defend, and you have absolutely no reason to disbelieve him. Pass, and I guarantee one side or the other is going to be having an animated post mortem when the deal is over…

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 7 4
 A J 9
 Q 9 8 3
♣ 8 4 2
South West North East
Pass 1 ♣ Pass Pass
Dbl. Rdbl. Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2016. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.