Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

The concept of two people living together for 25 years without a serious dispute suggests a lack of spirit only to be admired in sheep.

A. P. Herbert


East North
Neither ♠ Q 10 5 4
 K 9 7 6
 A 10
♣ J 3 2
West East
♠ A 6
 J 10 8 5 3
 J 9 7 6
♣ K 8
♠ 8 3
 Q 4 2
 Q 4 3
♣ A 7 6 5 4
South
♠ K J 9 7 2
 A
 K 8 5 2
♣ Q 10 9
South West North East
Pass
1♠ Pass 3♠ Pass
4♠ All pass    

J

Today's deal, from the Open Teams in San Remo, really succeeded in sorting out the men from the boys. Cover up the East and West hands before reading on.

The deal was played at many tables but East/West never entered the auction. South opened the bidding with one spade, North made some sort of limit raise to three spades and South went on to game. Plan the play on the lead of the heart jack.

Where the ‘boys’ were declaring, South won the lead and played a trump. But West went in with the ace and switched to the club king and another club, East winning with the ace and delivering West a club ruff for the setting trick. Well defended.

The ‘men’ were more alert to the possible danger. They won the heart ace, crossed to dummy with the diamond ace and discarded a club on the heart king before touching trumps.

According to the Daily Bulletin, the board was played 32 times in the Open Teams, and on 30 occasions the contract was four spades. On 14 occasions the result was down one, but on five of those the opening lead was the club king, so there was nothing declarer could do.

So we can be reasonably confident that at least nine declarers failed to cater for the potential club ruff. Sixteen declarers succeeded, but we don’t know if any of them were also careless but went unpunished.


It might seem the height of aggression to come into an auction at the three-level with a minimum opener, but you simply cannot afford to be stolen from in auctions of this sort. Even if you find yourself in game, when partner plays you for a little more than you have, they haven't doubled you yet. And there are other ways for your opponents to go wrong when you keep the auction open.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 9 7 2
 A
 K 8 5 2
♣ Q 10 9
South West North East
2 Pass 3
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them.

David Hume


East North
Both ♠ 9 4
 J 7 6 3 2
 K 4 2
♣ A K 6
West East
♠ K Q J 8 7 5
 K 5
 Q 7
♣ J 7 2
♠ 10 6 3 2
 Q 10 9 4
 10
♣ Q 9 4 3
South
♠ A
 A 8
 A J 9 8 6 5 3
♣ 10 8 5
South West North East
Pass
1 2♠ 3 Pass
4 Pass 5 Pass
6 All pass    

♠K

Almost every bridge player has a decent chance to score their aces and kings when they get the chance. But what distinguishes the better bridge player from his counterpart is the ability to score his small cards at the right time.

For example consider today’s deal, where after East-West have competed in spades, South has to make 12 tricks in diamonds. On winning the lead of the spade king with the ace, declarer should eliminate trumps, to make sure the defenders do not score a trump promotion by a ruff or overruff.

So play a middle trump to dummy’s king, followed by the two of trumps to your ace. Next comes ace and another heart to West’s king, marking the suit as no worse than 4-2.

After ruffing the spade continuation with a middle trump, the heart suit needs two entries to establish a long card and another to enjoy the long heart. As you have kept the precious three of trumps in hand, and the four in dummy, you have one entry to the North hand in the trump suit and two in clubs. 12 tricks made!

For the record, if you switch the club king and 10, you can still make six diamonds after the spade lead. But you have to be VERY careful. At trick two you must lead the low heart from hand. Then you can ruff the spade return, unblock the heart ace, draw two rounds of trumps ending in dummy, and go about establishing hearts as before.


Just because you rate to be outgunned doesn't mean you shouldn't overcall. But when your partner doesn't open in third chair, a good case can be made for passing when you really do not want to direct your partner to a heart lead if your RHO finishes up in spades. You are quite likely to be on lead against no-trump, so you don't have to tell yourself what to lead.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 9 4
 J 7 6 3 2
 K 4 2
♣ A K 6
South West North East
Pass Pass Pass 1♣
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Criticism is easy, art is difficult.

Philippe Destouches


South North
East-West ♠ 9 8
 10 5 2
 A K 8 6 4
♣ 5 4 3
West East
♠ K J 7 4
 J 8 6 3
 10
♣ J 10 9 6
♠ 10 3 2
 Q 9 7
 Q J 7 3
♣ 8 7 2
South
♠ A Q 6 5
 A K 4
 9 5 2
♣ A K Q
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♣J

Nobody ever pretended that bridge is a simple game, and all too often what makes it especially complicated is the inability to see the wood for the trees. Very few deals boil down to a simple analysis of requiring a specific number of tricks from one suit -there are all too often complicating factors which require you to play off one suit combination against another.

However, today’s deal is one where, if playing teams or rubber bridge, we can focus on a single theme and not worry too much about the other suits. Playing three no-trump on a top club lead from West, we can win in hand and should concentrate our energies on making nine tricks. With six sure winners outside diamonds, and no obvious danger suit, we simply require to take three diamond tricks. If we only need three tricks in the suit we can afford to lose two tricks, so at trick two we simply duck a diamond. East might do best to overtake his partner’s 10 and shift to a spade. If he does so, we duck his play of a low spade, and cover his 10 with the queen. On regaining the lead we can advance the diamond nine, planning to cover an honor from West, or duck again if West discards on this trick. Whatever happens after that, we can ensure our nine tricks against any lie of the cards.

Note that if you take either the first or second round of diamonds, the contract becomes unmakable.


Your partner is marked with at least scattered values and close to a maximum pass. The question is whether to go aggressive; if you did, you would probably lead a club rather than a heart, since even though dummy rates not to have long majors, your club holding is relatively safe. Or you could try to go passive with a spade. I vote for clubs, but make the club 10 the nine and I might change my mind.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 5 4
 K 7 6 3
 Q 5
♣ J 10 3 2
South West North East
Pass Pass 2 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, March 1st, 2015

Assuming you need five tricks with no outside information, holding the doubleton queen in dummy, and A-K-10-3-2 in hand, after playing the queen, is the percentage play to play for the drop or to finesse the 10?

Witch of Eastwick, Trenton, N.J.

The answer is a tossup. The math says the chance of a 3-3 break is just over one third, and the chance of a doubleton jack is one in six. So the chance of playing from the top is just fractionally over one half. Just for the record, with Q-10 facing A-K-4-3-2 the best line is to lead low to the 10, rather than playing for the drop.

After you hear your partner open one heart, and the next hand overcalls two clubs, would you start with a negative double, as I did, holding: ♠ A-Q-3-2,  5-3,  K-Q-3, ♣ J-9-4-2? If so, partner responds two spades, and you have to make a rebid. What would be your choice now?

Finding Nemo, Asheville, N.C.

You are by no means guaranteed to have an eight-card spade fit, as partner may have been forced to bid a three-card suit, so it would be premature to raise to four spades. I would bid two no-trumps, suggesting invitational values with a club stopper, surely holding four spades, else you would not have doubled in the first place. Your partner can now choose the strain and level he wants to play at.

I'm trying to learn how to make my opponents' life more difficult as declarer. Is there a general rule as to whether declarer, as fourth hand, should win the trick with the bottom or the top card from a sequence of equals? Similarly, when following suit, should one follow with the top or bottom of a sequence?

Harry Houdini, Seattle, Wash.

There is a general rule — with one common exception. When following suit or winning a trick, play the higher of equals, which will generally help to confuse opponents about the location of the lower honor. But at no-trump, when winning the first trick when holding either the ace-king or ace-king-queen, take the trick with the king.

Were you at the recent world championships in Sanya, China? Do you have any comment on how the events were run?

Grocer Jack, Chicago

I was not at the tournament, which seems to have been less popular than many of the recent big championships. Perhaps this was the distance of Sanya from Europe and most major cities? I know there were Internet problems and logistical problems at the event, but I fear these are the norm rather than the exception nowadays.

As opener I was unsure how forcing a new suit by responder should be at his second turn. I was recently dealt ♠ K-4,  J-7-2,  Q-3, ♣ A-Q-9-7-5-4, and opened one club, then rebid two clubs over my partner's response of one spade. What was I supposed to bid over my partner's call of two diamonds — is that call forcing, encouraging or weak?

Trumpet Voluntary, Elmira, N.Y.

A new suit by responder is forcing, even by a passed hand. Your duties are to support partner's first suit with three trumps or a strong doubleton, to rebid no-trump if you have the fourth suit controlled, or otherwise to make any other natural and descriptive call. Here supporting to two spades seems right — partner should not expect you to have three good trumps, since you might already have raised him.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, February 28th, 2015

Thinking to me is the greatest fatigue in the world.

Sir John Vanbrugh


South North
Neither ♠ 10
 Q J 3
 J 10 9 4 2
♣ K 7 5 2
West East
♠ J 7 4 2
 5 2
 K Q 8 7
♣ Q 9 6
♠ A 8 5 3
 9 7
 6 3
♣ J 10 8 4 3
South
♠ K Q 9 6
 A K 10 8 6 4
 A 5
♣ A
South West North East
1 Pass 2 Pass
6 All pass    

K

When ducking an ace it is generally a good idea to have planned the play in advance to make the play effective. Consider this deal, from a rubber bridge game in the United Kingdom.

When West leads the diamond king, declarer wins, cashes the club ace and crosses to dummy with a trump to discard a diamond on the club king. Are you still up with the hand? Declarer now leads the spade 10 from dummy; what should you play after winning the ace?

That is the question most players would ask themselves, and a trump seems obvious enough – but that is too late. Declarer can simply ruff his remaining spade loser in dummy, and has the rest.

Maurice Weissberger was East and he found a much better defense when he ducked his spade ace rather than taking it. As you will see from the full deal, below, when Maurice played low on the spade 10, declarer made the natural play of running it to West’s jack. Back came a second trump and declarer won in dummy, ruffed a diamond to hand, and now took a ruffing finesse against the spade ace to go one down.

Declarer could have made the hand had he hopped up with the spade king initially, but his play catered for every lie of the cards – except the actual one.


It is tempting to advance with a call of one no-trump, but this hand seems generally too weak for that call. Yes, spades may not be our side's best spot, but the risks associated with bidding and getting the auction too high are surely more significant. If the opponents decide to double one spade for penalty, you may change your mind as to where to play.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10
 Q J 3
 J 10 9 4 2
♣ K 7 5 2
South West North East
1♣ 1♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, February 27th, 2015

Personally I think that competition should be encouraged in war and sport and business, but that it makes no sense in the arts. If an artist is good, nobody else can do what he or she does and therefore all comparisons are incoherent.

Edward St. Aubyn


South North
Neither ♠ Q 7 5
 10 8
 K J 6 4 2
♣ 10 8 5
West East
♠ J 10 9 6
 7 6 4 2
 10 5 3
♣ A 7
♠ A K 8 3
 5 3
 Q 9 7
♣ Q 6 4 2
South
♠ 4 2
 A K Q J 9
 A 8
♣ K J 9 3
South West North East
1 Pass 1 NT Pass
3♣ Pass 3 Pass
4 All pass    

♠J

In today's deal declarer plays four hearts, after having created a game-forcing auction at the second turn. Maybe South should bid three no-trump at his third turn, but the defenders could take four spades and a club against that game.

Still, four hearts is no picnic. Declarer has to choose which minor suit to go after, once the defenders lead three rounds of spades against four hearts. South ruffs, and could draw trumps and play ace and another diamond, planning to finesse. This requires finding queen-third of diamonds onside, or finding the diamond queen favorably placed, and the doubleton club queen with East. The combined chances for this line is less than one in four.

Playing on clubs first offers a much better chance, since it works most of the time that the club queen is favorably located (though the defenders will sometimes be able to defeat you by ducking the club ace, then taking a ruff).

Best is to ruff the spade high at trick three, then to play the heart nine to the 10 and run the club eight. You can now ruff the fourth spade in dummy rather than in hand, to preserve control of the trump suit. And by running the club eight, hopefully losing to the ace, you plan to regain the lead, draw trumps, then cross back to the diamond king and run the club 10. This retains the lead in dummy to repeat the club finesse as many times as necessary.


Painful as it may be to sell out here, it seems to me that your best chance to go plus here is to pass. You showed an extremely good hand and could not get your partner interested in bidding on. Surely he would have acted with any weak hand with heart support, so your best chance here may be to pass and hope to beat three diamonds.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 4 2
 A K Q J 9
 A 8
♣ K J 9 3
South West North East
Pass Pass 1
Dbl. 1♠ Pass Pass
2 3 Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, February 26th, 2015

No man who is correctly informed as to the past will be disposed to take a morose or desponding view of the present.

Lord Macaulay


South North
Both ♠ 4 3
 K J 9
 J 10 6 4
♣ 9 8 6 2
West East
♠ A 9 8 7 5
 8 7 4
 K 7
♣ 10 4 3
♠ Q J 10
 6 5
 9 8 5 2
♣ K Q 7 5
South
♠ K 6 2
 A Q 10 3 2
 A Q 3
♣ A J
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♠7

This deal came up nearly 50 years ago and, at the time, nobody blamed West too much for his defense, but if the hand were played today, the result might well have been different.

Against three no-trump West led the spade seven to the three, 10 and king. The contract seemed to depend on the diamond finesse, but declarer did well to lead the heart 10 to dummy’s jack and ran the diamond jack to West’s king. From West’s point of view, South might have started with king-queen-third of spades, in which case another spade lead could well give declarer his ninth trick. So West shifted to a club, hoping that his partner held an entry, and now declarer had 10 tricks.

Let us advance in time – firstly, North might well have enquired for four or five card majors by bidding three clubs over two no-trumps – this would have led to a contract of four hearts which, although defeated on best defense, might easily scramble home.

Secondly, this was before the days of Smith Peters, so East could not suggest by his play to the first diamond trick whether or not he liked his partner’s opening lead. Thirdly, technique has improved – against three no-trump East will contribute the jack, not the 10, to the first trick. Then West will know that it is safe to lead another low spade for, from his point of view, either his partner holds the queen or declarer still has the queen and 10.


Your partner's double is take-out, suggesting real extras, but your hand seems eminently suitable for defense. I would pass expecting partner to have a strong hand with maybe 4-4-2-3 pattern and 18+ points, and that the opponents would have nowhere to run.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 4 3
 K J 9
 J 10 6 4
♣ 9 8 6 2
South West North East
Pass 1♠ Dbl. Pass
2♣ 2 Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

To see what is in front of one's nose requires a constant struggle.

George Orwell


South North
Neither ♠ J 8 5
 10 9 7 2
 J 5 2
♣ A K Q
West East
♠ 9 7 6 3
 A K J 4
 A 10 6
♣ 7 3
♠ 4
 Q 8 6 5
 Q 9 8 4 3
♣ 5 4 2
South
♠ A K Q 10 2
 3
 K 7
♣ J 10 9 8 6
South West North East
1♠ Pass 1 NT* Pass
2♣ Pass 3♠ Pass
4♠ All pass    

*Forcing

K

Today's deal focuses one of those suits that seem to feature remarkably often in the bridge problems – but which cause just as many problems in real life.

The auction features the forcing no-trump response by an unpassed hand to a major-suit opening bid. This allows North to raises one of a major to three with a shapely hand (typically four-card support)and invitational values, and to go through one no-trump to suggest about an 11-count with three trumps in a balanced hand.

For the record: playing the forcing no-trump is a good idea if you play two over one forcing. Otherwise it is certainly hard to differentiate between the various invitational hands.

As you can see, South has 10 top winners in four spades – at first, if not at second glance. When West begins with two top hearts against the spade game, declarer ruffs the second round then cashes the ace and king of trumps.

If trumps break, the hand is over, since declarer can draw trumps and then unblock clubs, and still have a trump left to reach his hand. But the 4-1 trump break is a little awkward for declarer, since he has to deal with unblocking dummy’s clubs before he can make 10 tricks. He cannot do this if he draws all the remaining trumps straight away. Instead he must cash two of dummy’s clubs, and only then can he draw the remaining trumps. On the last trump he discards dummy’s remaining club. He makes five trumps and five clubs.


To me this is a textbook raise to three no-trumps without going through Stayman. Factors in favor of this approach are the combination of your excellent values coupled with square side-suit shape and weak hearts, all of which argue that finding hearts might be the only way to go minus. And the simple raise gives far less away about your and your partner's shape to the opening leader.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 5 2
 10 9 7 2
 J 5 2
♣ A K Q
South West North East
Pass 2 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

If you care enough for a result, you will most certainly attain it.

William James


South North
East-West ♠ 8 5
 A 6
 A Q 7 5 4
♣ 8 6 4 3
West East
♠ J 10 9 3
 J 8
 K 10 8 6
♣ Q J 9
♠ Q 7 6 4 2
 Q 10 9 2
 2
♣ K 10 2
South
♠ A K
 K 7 5 4 3
 J 9 3
♣ A 7 5
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♠J

There are enough inferior plays and cutting comments at the Dyspeptics Club to provide splendid entertainment – though a significant portion of the discussions might carry an R-rating.

In three no-trumps one might have expected South to make a play first, and start thinking about what he should have done later. Instead, declarer captured the spade lead in hand, and actually paused to consider what might go wrong. The only danger that he could envisage was a 4-1 diamond break, so he improved on the simple finesse by leading to the diamond ace. Had East held a significant singleton or West the diamond king, this line would have worked, but in fact the shortage of entries to dummy would have left declarer awkwardly placed against anything but a singleton king. And today with East having a small singleton, his line failed. When South complained about his bad luck he received the verbal equivalent of raspberry from his partner. Can you see why?

Leading the nine to the ace might have covered the situation where East had a singleton king, eight or 10, but it is possible to do even better. Best of all would have been to lead the diamond jack from hand at the second trick. If West covers with the king declarer can win the ace and lead to his nine to ensure four diamond tricks. This line works against any singleton in East bar a singleton king, and also against a singleton king or 10 in West.


You have more than enough to bid on here, given your double fit plus the knowledge of partner being really short in spades. But bidding four hearts would be lazy; you must bid four clubs to keep partner in the picture and to help him judge the five- or six-level. Would it amaze you if you were cold for slam in either clubs or hearts? It certainly wouldn't surprise me!

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 7 6 4 2
 Q 10 9 2
 2
♣ K 10 2
South West North East
1 Pass
2 2♠ 3♣ 3♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, February 23rd, 2015

Misery still delights to trace
Its semblance in another’s case.

William Cowper


South North
Neither ♠ A J 10 7 4
 A 9 5
 4 2
♣ Q 6 4
West East
♠ 3
 Q 8 7 6 2
 K 8 3
♣ J 10 7 2
♠ 5
 K J 10 3
 J 9 7 6
♣ K 9 8 3
South
♠ K Q 9 8 6 2
 4
 A Q 10 5
♣ A 5
South West North East
1♠ Pass 2 NT Pass
3 Pass 3♠ Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
5 NT Pass 6♠ All pass

6

It was easy enough for North-South to bid to a slam on this deal from the Nationals at Vancouver — particularly if East had doubled a heart cuebid, making South's hand even more valuable. The North hand is difficult to value over an opening bid of one spade. Most experts these days have a way to show a game-forcing hand in support of spades — and that should be enough to excite South enough to drive to the six-level.

However making the slam was a tougher matter; it required some accurate card reading, together with a knowledge of technique. On a heart lead, South does best to win dummy’s ace and finesse the diamond queen at once. If the diamond king is onside, he has 12 tricks at once by ruffing dummy’s heart losers in hand. However, when the diamond finesse loses, declarer seems to be almost out of chances — not so. Put yourself in South’s position and see if you can spot your slim residual chance.

The answer is that you must play East for the club king and four diamonds to the jack. Ruff the likely heart return, (a diamond does not disrupt the timing although it leads to a slightly different ending) and cross to dummy with a trump to ruff another heart. Now comes the key for producing certainty in the ending; cash the club ace, — the Vienna Coup — and run all your trumps, reducing everyone to three cards. Dummy’s three cards include the club queen and a diamond, and on the last trump, East has to reduce to only two diamonds since he cannot discard his club king. Now you can bring in the diamond suit for the last three tricks via the finesse of the 10. You cash the ace, and your last diamond wins trick 13.


I don't particularly like the trump lead here (dummy rates to be very short and we might be pickling partner's vulnerable honor. So though I am not a fan of leading doubletons in declarer's suit, I will start off with the diamond eight, knowing that the auction has suggested to my partner that declarer won't be overloaded in diamonds, and thus he may work out not to give me a ruff.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ A 10 6 5
 9 6 4
 8 5
♣ A Q 4 3
South West North East
Pass 1 Pass 1
Pass 2♣ Pass 2
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.