Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, January 8th, 2015

A brain of feathers, and a heart of lead.

Alexander Pope


West North
East-West ♠ Q 10
 K J 10 6
 Q J
♣ Q J 7 6 4
West East
♠ A K J 9 2
 9 5
 K 7 4 2
♣ A 5
♠ 8 7 6 4
 3 2
 10 6 3
♣ 10 9 8 2
South
♠ 5 3
 A Q 8 7 4
 A 9 8 5
♣ K 3
South West North East
1♠ Pass Pass
2 Pass 2♠ Pass
3 Pass 4 All pass

♠K

There are plenty of people at the Dyspeptics Club who would consider raising one spade to two as East, to muddy the waters for the opponents, but at unfavorable vulnerability today's East was not amongst them. Accordingly North-South had a relatively free run to four hearts, against which West cashed his two high spades and shifted to a passive trump. That left declarer free to tackle the hearts and clubs as best he could, without any help from the opponents. At the table he saw no need to look further than drawing trumps and advancing the club king. West took the trick and continued with his passive defense, by returning a club.

Now South tested clubs first, then when they failed to behave he took the diamond finesse, and was more hurt than surprised when it lost.

South was about to start lamenting his bad luck when he noticed from his partner’s premature gloat that this would be inappropriate. Untypically, he asked his partner if there was anything he could have done, rather than trying to absolve himself from blame. What was the response?

South should have drawn trumps ending in his hand then led a low club toward the dummy. West cannot gain by taking the trick and having his ace fall on empty air. But when he ducks, he is thrown in at the next trick with the club ace, to give a ruff-sluff or lead diamonds for declarer. Either way, 10 tricks result.


It is normal to reopen with a double when you are short in the opponents' suit, in case partner was lurking with a penalty double. Here, though, your clubs seem too good for that to be possible and your hearts are too weak to welcome a response in that suit. So simply bid two diamonds now – with passing a viable if pessimistic alternative, in case the opponents have missed the boat in hearts.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A K J 9 2
 9 5
 K 7 4 2
♣ A 5
South West North East
1♠ 2♣ Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Nobody is smarter than you are. And what if they are? What good is their understanding doing you?

Terence McKenna


North North
North-South ♠ K 3 2
 7 3
 A 4
♣ A K Q 10 8 4
West East
♠ 10 9 8 5 4
 A J 10
 J 10 8 2
♣ 7
♠ J
 Q 9 8 6 5
 Q 9 5
♣ 9 6 3 2
South
♠ A Q 7 6
 K 4 2
 K 7 6 3
♣ J 5
South West North East
1♣ Pass
1 Pass 3♣ Pass
4♣ Pass 4 Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
6 NT All pass    

♠10

Some of the clever plays found by experts are absurdly simple. Watch Zia Mahmood at work in his contract of six no-trump. West leads the spade 10, you play low from dummy, East contributes the jack and you win the ace. Plan the play before reading on.

The obvious thing to do is lead a heart to your king, but can you see the extra chance spotted by Zia? At trick two he played the spade six from his hand and ran it when West twitched, then played low. That was his 12th trick immediately. Zia was confident that East would not have played the jack unless he had to, and West did not see the need to split his honors, but learned the hard way that it never pays to underestimate your opponents.

Zia might still have succeeded had West split his spade intermediates. Ever the showman, he would have seen that he could make his slam by playing West for the heart ace. If he runs all his winners coming down to a three-card ending (where in his hand he holds the singleton heart king and spade Q-7) West either has to discard down to the singleton spade nine, allowing Zia to run the spades, or else come down to the singleton heart ace, in which case Zia could exit with a heart to endplay West into leading a spade.

We cannot be sure Zia would have played the hand this way, but in my experience it does not pay to bet against him.


Your partner's double here suggests a balanced hand – and indicates the possibility of defending if you have the appropriate hand. Passing would be a reasonable gamble here but you seem to have too much in spades and not enough aces to want to defend. Accordingly, a retreat to three spades seems wise.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 7 6
 K 4 2
 K 7 6 3
♣ J 5
South West North East
Pass
1 Pass 1♠ 2♣
2♠ 3♣ Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

No man can lose what he never had.

Izaak Walton


North North
East-West ♠ A K
 J 4 3
 Q 6 5
♣ Q J 10 9 7
West East
♠ J 9 7 3 2
 10 7 5
 3 2
♣ K 6 2
♠ 10 5 4
 A Q 9 8
 10 9 8 7 4
♣ A
South
♠ Q 8 6
 K 6 2
 A K J
♣ 8 5 4 3
South West North East
1♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

♠3

Put yourself in East's shoes and see if you can do the math in today's deal.

When South jumps directly to three no-trumps over one club, West leads the spade jack and your first question is what is South’s likely distribution? Very probably he has 3-3-3-4 pattern with a minor and 13-15 points — possibly a 12-count with good intermediates. Declarer wins the lead in dummy, and calls for the club queen. Your ace holds the trick.

Now is the time for some more counting. Dummy has 13 points; you expect declarer to have about the same, and you have nine. Partner can have only one significant high card, thus the only suit that could produce three winners for your side is hearts. If you lead a low heart that will do the job at once if partner has the king, but if what declarer has that card and partner has the heart 10 plus an entry in the form of the club king? Now leading the heart ace won’t do the job, nor will the eight or nine, as declarer will run that to the jack.

The only card to help your cause is the queen. If South covers with the king, partner is well-placed to play his heart 10 through dummy’s jack when in with the club king. And if South ducks, a low heart next will keep defensive communications open and lead to five tricks for the defense.


Just as in today's deal you were all set to jump to three no-trumps, but the opposition intervention allows you to cuebid two hearts, and maybe reach the no-trump game from partner's hand. That would be a good idea any time partner had a positional heart stopper (such as queen doubleton or queen-third).

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 8 6
 K 6 2
 A K J
♣ 8 5 4 3
South West North East
Pass 1♣ 1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, January 5th, 2015

To dry one's eyes and laugh at a fall,
And, baffled, get up and begin again.

Robert Browning


South North
East-West ♠ Q 10 4
 K 7 2
 J 10 9 5
♣ Q 8 7
West East
♠ 9 8 6 3
 A Q J 10 9
 A 6
♣ 5 4
♠ 5
 8 5 4 3
 8 7 4 3 2
♣ A 9 6
South
♠ A K J 7 2
 6
 K Q
♣ K J 10 3 2
South West North East
1♠ 2 2♠ 3
4♠ All pass    

A

In today's deal the slip that declarer made was an elementary one, but the play seemed so straightforward that many players would relax, expecting to have 10 tricks on top, and would not see the significance of their mistake.

Against four spades West decided to go for a forcing defense by leading the heart ace then queen. It looks normal for South to take this with the king and discard a club from hand, assuming that he would simply lose the two minor-suit aces in the fullness of time.

This was what our declarer did, but he paid for his carelessness by going down. He drew two rounds of trump to find the bad news, then advanced the diamond king, and West won the first diamond (if he ducks, declarer reverts to clubs and survives unscathed) and played a third heart to reduce declarer to trump equality with him. Now declarer tried the club king. When East ducked, declarer played a second club and East won and gave his partner a club ruff. Had declarer drawn trump before playing a second club, the defenders could have run the hearts when in with the club ace.

The correct discard at trick two is a diamond. Declarer then draws trumps and continues by playing on clubs. The defenders can take their ace and force declarer again, but he runs his winners and concedes trick 13 to the diamond ace. In retrospect it is hard to imagine why one would take any other approach…and yet, the mistake is hardly an unreasonable one.


You might look for an alternative to leading a doubleton honor into a hand that has promised at least one heart guard. But here any choice looks just as dangerous, and the one thing you know about a heart lead is that you are planning to set up a long suit, to which partner will have an entry. So lead the heart jack.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ J 7 2
 J 4
 Q 7 5 2
♣ 8 5 4 3
South West North East
1 1 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, January 4th, 2015

What is your opinion on opening two no-trump with a weak doubleton, or with a five-card major, or indeed with both? I recently picked up ♠ A-Q-10-7-3,  9-5,  A-Q-5, ♣ A-K-J, and elected to open one spade. My partner disagreed with my perception of the hand's flaws for an opening of two no-trump. What do you think?

Looking Lively, Pleasanton, Calif.

You should appreciate that all the alternatives to opening two no-trump are far more seriously flawed. You misstate the hand's strength by opening one spade — and also leave yourself without any sensible rebids no matter what partner does. Open two no-trump and settle for imperfection. The best is the enemy of the good.

Do you favor an ace or king opening lead from length holding including both cards, and what is your rationale for the choice?

Robber Baron, Atlanta, Ga.

The king from ace-king for me. The only real problem holding opposite an ambiguous king lead is something like jack-third (and this really only presents a problem with dummy holding neither the queen nor ace, and 3-plus cards. In other words, you generally know when to signal attitude and when not. Additionally, this method lets an ace lead deny the king.

How much do you need to make a free bid in response to a take-out double? In second seat after hearing the auction start one diamond – pass — one no-trump double – two clubs, should I bid two spades holding: ♠ J-9-7-3,  7-5,  10-8-6-5, ♣ A-7-4, or is passing more discreet?

Entry-Level, Great Falls, Mont.

This hand is on the cusp for acting. I probably would stretch to bid, buoyed by the fact that my failure to act initially or cuebid two diamonds now limits my hand a little. But make my side-suit shape flatter and I could be persuaded to pass, especially if the vulnerability was against me.

Holding: ♠ 10-8-6-5,  K-2,  Q-9-8-6-3 ♣ A 4 I heard my partner open one diamond, and my RHO overcall one heart. I thought all three of the choices of raising diamonds to the two- or three-level, doubling, or bidding one no-trump had merit. What do you say?

Spoiled for Choice, Boise, Idaho

When you hold support for partner's minor and four cards in the other major you will normally double first, then support partner. Bidding one spade shows five here, of course. One no-trump looks wrong with only one heart stop, and if you raise diamonds you may never find spades. By the way, remember that a jump raise of diamonds in competition is frequently played these days as preemptive rather than invitational.

I wonder if you could tell me what criteria one should use as to whether to pass or open (and if the latter, at what level) a hand like: ♠ Q-10-6-5-4-3,  A-J,  Q-J-5, ♣ J-3. How do position and vulnerability – or even the form of scoring – affect this question?

Careful Does It, Montgomery, Ala.

Almost any 11-count without a vulnerable singleton honor is a one-level opening for me. Change the diamond five into a small club and I might open two spades in second seat. The most important piece of advice I can give is always to open when you have a good suit. No hand with a good suit falls between a weak-two and one-level opening bid. You can pass a hand with a bad suit, of course. This applies at any form of scoring. In second seat be more disciplined than in first and surely in third seat.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, January 3rd, 2015

Vanity can easily overtake wisdom. It usually overtakes common sense.

Julian Casablancas


East North
East-West ♠ A 5
 A K 10 2
 7 3
♣ A K J 9 4
West East
♠ Q 7
 J 8 5 4
 A K Q 2
♣ Q 10 5
♠ K J 9 8 6 4 3
 7 3
 J 6 5
♣ 3
South
♠ 10 2
 Q 9 6
 10 9 8 4
♣ 8 7 6 2
South West North East
3♠
Pass Pass Dbl. Pass
4♣ Pass 5♣ All pass

K

Early last year eight pairs took part in the Belgium open team trials for the European Championships in Opatija, Croatia, which took place last July. The top three pairs would qualify through an exhaustive round robin process over a seven day period, and with one day to go, those top three places seemed decided. However, the third-placed pair (Philippe Coenraets and Steven De Donder) were overtaken at the death by Patrick Bocken and Olivier Neve. This was the decisive board in their individual encounter.

After the lead of the diamond king and ace against Neve’s five clubs (East showing an odd number), West switched to the spade queen. Neve took the ace, and realized that East rated to have seven spades and three diamonds; thus he would have to be short in one of hearts or clubs. Since North-South had nine clubs and seven hearts between them, it was far more likely that East’s shortage was in clubs.

So South cashed just one top club, then played the heart ace and queen, and finessed the heart 10 as East helplessly discarded. Now he could take the heart king to discard a spade, and ruff a spade back to hand. Finally he could take the marked trump finesse for an impressive plus 600. Note that if declarer uses his heart entry to take the early finesse in trumps he can never get back to hand to take the heart finesse.


There is a real temptation to raise to three hearts, but if you play New Minor Forcing (where a bid of two clubs is forcing and the way you start describing most invitational or game-forcing hands) then this sequence is weak and denies invitational values with both majors. North should have less than invitational values, and you should pass and hope to go plus.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 7
 J 8 5 4
 A K Q 2
♣ Q 10 5
South West North East
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, January 2nd, 2015

We must change (our ideas) when they have served their purpose, as we change a blunt lancet that we have used long enough.

Claude Bernard


West North
Both ♠ 6 2
 Q 9 2
 9 5 4 3
♣ A K J 10
West East
♠ A 4
 A K J 7 4 3
 Q 7 6
♣ Q 5
♠ 9 7 5 3
 8
 10 8 2
♣ 9 8 7 3 2
South
♠ K Q J 10 8
 10 6 5
 A K J
♣ 6 4
South West North East
1 Pass Pass
Dbl. 2 Pass Pass
2♠ Pass 3♠ All pass

K

Defense is a partnership effort, and suit preference is a way for the players to cooperate, by suggesting a line of play to your partner.

Here, for example, as West you lead out the heart king and ace, partner playing the eight followed by the club two (discouraging and suggesting a five-card suit if he is signaling count). It is up to you to plan the defense from this point on when giving your partner the ruff.

A diamond play can never really help your side, can it, since declarer is marked from the auction with all the missing high cards? When South balanced with two spades he showed that he surely has both high diamonds and relatively solid spades. So if you signal for a diamond and partner obediently plays one (which would be right if you had the diamond and spade kings instead of your actual hand) declarer would win in hand and drive out the spade ace, then take the club finesse for his contract. There is nothing that you can do to prevent him from bringing clubs in for the discards he needs.

The correct thing to do is to play the heart three, asking partner to return a club. Then if you continue a club when in with the spade ace, declarer can never make more than two club tricks and you will score any diamond tricks to which your side is entitled. An alternative might be to shift to a club yourself at trick three…unless declarer started with a singleton!


The pessimistic options would be to pass two hearts, or give preference to two spades. This hand feels a little too good for those cautious actions. With three working cards for my partner, I would guess to raise to three hearts, as an invitation. Yes, I am a trump short, but I've done worse.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 6 2
 Q 9 2
 9 5 4 3
♣ A K J 10
South West North East
1♠ Pass
1 NT 2 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, January 1st, 2015

Oh, 'tis a glorious thing, I ween,
To be a regular Royal Queen!
No half-and-half affair I mean,
But a regular Royal Queen!

W. S. Gilbert


North North
Neither ♠ A 10 6
 A 4
 K 10 9 7
♣ A 10 7 6
West East
♠ J 9 8 3 2
 K 7 2
 6 4 3 2
♣ 9
♠ —
 Q J 10 9 8 6
 A Q 8 5
♣ Q 8 5
South
♠ K Q 7 5 4
 5 3
 J
♣ K J 4 3 2
South West North East
1 NT 2*
2 NT** 3 Pass Pass
3♠ Pass 4♠ Pass
Pass Dbl. All pass  

*Hearts and a minor

**Lebensohl

2

On this board from a recent US Women's trials Kerri Sanborn proved herself up to the task of bringing home a tricky game. Her call of two no-trumps was artificial, designed to sign off in a minor or invite in spades, and when she showed the invitational hand, Juanita Chambers had enough to raise to game.

In the open room, four spades had also been bid, after East-West had bid up to four hearts. It was not doubled, and went two down. However, when Sanborn was declarer, the heart two was led to the ace. Sanborn then carefully played a spade to hand, getting the bad news.

Now life looks very straightforward if you can find the club queen, but that is not so. Sanborn continued with a spade to the 10, then cashed the spade ace and had to take a view on the club position. East’s failure to raise to four hearts implied that she was not 6-5, accordingly she was more likely to hold three clubs.

So Sanborn played an immediate club to the jack, and when it held, she could play off the spade king (discarding a blocking club from dummy, a move that is also critical to making the hand) and be one step ahead of the defense. East-West could take only their spade, heart and diamond tricks. Notice that if declarer plays ace and a second club at an early point in the hand, West gets two ruffs and beats the contract.


Despite the attractive prospects this hand held when you picked it up, the hand has turned to ashes. With no obvious spade or club fit having emerged, since you have neither aces, nor any fit for diamonds, you should pass two diamonds, and hope to make it.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K Q 7 5 4
 5 3
 J
♣ K J 4 3 2
South West North East
Pass 1 Pass
1♠ Pass 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

Take therefore no thought for the morrow; for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself.

Book of Matthew


North North
East-West ♠ A K 9 7 3
 5 4 3
 A 7 3
♣ A Q
West East
♠ 10 8 4
 8 6 2
 K 10 5 2
♣ 10 3 2
♠ Q 5 2
 A K 7
 J 9 6 4
♣ J 5 4
South
♠ J 6
 Q J 10 9
 Q 8
♣ K 9 8 7 6
South West North East
1♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 2 NT Pass
3 NT All pass    

8

At the table West led the heart eight against three no-trump, which went to East's king, declarer playing the jack. Without giving the matter too much thought, East continued with ace and another heart, and declarer won and cashed his last heart, pitching a diamond from dummy, then crossed to the club queen and led a spade towards his jack. East plunged in with the queen and shifted to a diamond; too late. Declarer had nine tricks now when the spades came in. How many mistakes were made here?

When East saw the jack from declarer he should have realized that his partner’s heart lead could not be fourth-highest. Were that so, his partner would have begun life with Q-10-9-8 and he would have led the 10, rather than a low card. So East should have shifted to a diamond – a play that required the least from his partner, in the form of four diamonds to the king. A club shift, by contrast might both need his partner to have good clubs and for declarer to have a singleton spade.

And what about declarer’s play to the first trick? Could he have followed suit with a card that might have been less revealing about his holding? I believe so. Had he followed with the heart 10 at the first trick, East might legitimately have played his partner for Q-J-9-8-x of hearts, when the initial lead of a low heart would have been at least a plausible alternative to a high card.


There are two questions here. The first is whether to go low with a response of three hearts, or to commit the hand to game. In the latter case the next question is whether to bid four hearts or to offer a choice of games with a four diamond cuebid. Given the solidity of the heart spots, a 4-3 fit may play just fine, so I would bid four hearts here.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ J 6
 Q J 10 9
 Q 8
♣ K 9 8 7 6
South West North East
Pass 3 Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

With regard to excellence, it is not enough to know, but we must try to have and use it.

Aristotle


South North
Both ♠ K 4 2
 Q 6 4 3
 8
♣ K J 10 3 2
West East
♠ J 7
 A K 8 7 5
 9 7 6 4
♣ 8 4
♠ A 9 5
 J 10
 K J 10 5
♣ 9 7 6 5
South
♠ Q 10 8 6 3
 9 2
 A Q 3 2
♣ A Q
South West North East
1♠ Pass 2♠ Pass
3 Pass 4♠ All pass

K

The Bridge player's 10 Commandments should definitely feature a prohibition on leading your partner into error, together with instructions on how to steer him away from the faulty path.

On the hand above from the Marlboro Bermuda Bowl in 1995 far too many of the defenders in the West seat were in an impious mood. They led a top heart, and on observing their partner’s jack had to continue with a second top heart, in case their partner had started with a singleton.

But what next? The popular decision seemed to be to play a passive heart eight — which might even promote the spade jack into a trump trick if your partner were dealt specifically the doubleton spade queen-10. You can however see the denouement; East trustingly ruffed the third heart, and declarer overruffed and later played the remaining trumps to be 2-2, thus making his contract.

This was short-sighted defense by West; the actual layout in trumps is quite predictable and much more likely than finding East with a very specific doubleton. In addition, if declarer needs one discard only, say for his third club, he can always take it later. It must be better simply to exit with a diamond (which is not doing anything for declarer that he cannot do for himself) and hope to leave declarer to do all his hard work on his own.


It is tempting to do more than raise to three clubs, but bear in mind that a singleton diamond is not exactly an asset, your spade king looks poorly placed, and your heart queen my well be worthless. Three clubs is quite enough here – though to do less would be extremely cowardly.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 4 2
 Q 6 4 3
 8
♣ K J 10 3 2
South West North East
1 Pass
1 1♠ 2♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.