Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, November 17th, 2017

Every man I meet wants to protect me. I can’t figure out what from.

Mae West


W North
Both ♠ 7 6
 K J 2
 9 6 5 2
♣ A K 7 4
West East
♠ K 3
 10 8 7 6 3
 K 8 4
♣ 8 5 3
♠ 5 4 2
 A Q 9 5 4
 A 7 3
♣ 10 9
South
♠ A Q J 10 9 8
 —
 Q J 10
♣ Q J 6 2
South West North East
  Pass Pass 1
1 ♠ 3 Pass Pass
3 ♠ Pass 4 ♠ All pass
       

6

South has a fine overcall of one spade at any vulnerability. He cannot afford to double first and bid spades later, for that would show a hand with greater high-card strength. If North cannot take independent action, game is very unlikely.

North is pre-empted out of the auction by West’s raise, but when South comes again, North has enough to bid game. While he could opt for no-trump, he can see that the defenders rate to be able to establish hearts easily, so spades looks safer.

The first few tricks are routine. South plays low from dummy (hoping to force an honor), but East defends strongly by putting in the nine. South ruffs the first heart, gets to dummy with a club and tries the trump finesse.

The finesse loses, and South is forced to ruff another heart. Now South must be careful not to run out of trumps. He must go after the diamonds, putting the trumps on hold. If he does so, by the time South has knocked out both top diamonds, dummy will be out of hearts. So when the defenders lead a fourth heart, dummy will ruff and South can save a trump. As it happens, the defenders will lead a club instead, and South can win and draw trumps.

If South had drawn trumps before attacking the diamonds, he would have left himself with only one trump. He would knock out one top diamond, and West would win. Then a heart return would allow East to defeat the contract by running the hearts when in with the diamond ace.


The practical call is to bid one no-trump now. With four diamonds in your hand, what’s a stopper between friends? This call represents your values accurately since it shows 8-12 or so, an approximately balanced hand with not much in partner’s suit, and mildly constructive values.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 7 6
 K J 2
 9 6 5 2
♣ A K 7 4
South West North East
  1 1 ♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Midnight shakes the memory
As a madman shakes a dead geranium.

T.S. Eliot


N North
None ♠ 10 7 6 5
 Q J 9 6 3
 7 5
♣ 8 2
West East
♠ A K Q 2
 8
 Q J 9 3
♣ A K J 9
♠ J 9 8 4
 5 4 2
 10 8 6
♣ Q 5 4
South
♠ 3
 A K 10 7
 A K 4 2
♣ 10 7 6 3
South West North East
Pass Pass
1 Dbl. 4 Pass
Pass Dbl. All pass  

♠K

When this hand came up in a high standard event in the 1960s, what would nowadays be a reasonable call was then considered to be aggressive to the point of lunacy. But the value of total trumps was still not established. Sometimes, though, I wish those days would come back …

North-South were playing four-card majors, and it was North’s jump to four hearts after West’s double that was the subject of discussion. After two passes, West doubled again to end the auction.

West led the spade king, and when dummy’s trumps appeared, declarer thanked his partner for the dummy, then retracted his gratitude on seeing the rest of his hand. At trick two, West switched to a trump, and declarer, maybe still steaming over North’s lack of values, did not give the deal his full attention.

He won the trump in hand, cashed his top diamonds and ruffed a diamond, then ruffed a spade to hand. He could trump his last diamond high in order to ruff another spade, but now had to lead a club. East carefully overtook his partner’s nine to lead a second round of trumps, and South was left with a spade loser for down one.

If declarer had not lost focus, he might have won the trump in dummy at trick two. Now he would have time to trump three spades in hand (ruffing the third diamond high) for 10 tricks.

One final thought: Why didn’t West lead a trump originally? Then East could take a black suit lead and lead a second trump.


This hand feels right for Crawling Stayman to me. That is to say, bid Stayman and pass a response in a major, or correct two diamonds to two hearts, suggesting a major suit pattern broadly similar to this. Partner will typically pass, but can correct to two spades with 3-2 in the majors. If you don’t play these methods, escape to hearts instead.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 7 6 5
 Q J 9 3 2
 7 5
♣ 8 2
South West North East
  Pass 1 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

I never metaphor I didn’t like.

Mardy Grothe


N North
N-S ♠ A
 J 10 4 2
 A K 9 6 2
♣ Q 6 2
West East
♠ J 7 4 2
 Q 9 7
 J 4
♣ K 10 9 5
♠ Q 8 6 5 3
 8 6 5
 Q 8 7 3
♣ 4
South
♠ K 10 9
 A K 3
 10 5
♣ A J 8 7 3
South West North East
    1 Pass
2 ♣ Pass 3 ♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

♠2

Today’s deal comes from one of my readers, Jeff Aker of Briarcliff Manor, New York. It cropped up in the Open U.S. Trials this spring.

The auction at the table was different from what is shown here. In real life, North had opened a precision diamond and had shown a three-card club raise with a singleton major, but the final contract was as indicated. Plan the play after a low spade lead from West goes to dummy’s ace.

The contract will be easy to make if clubs break 3-2. What is the best way to protect yourself against the 10 possible 4-1 breaks? (East can have one of any five singletons, or West can have one of any five singletons.)

If you finesse the club jack, then, as the cards lie, West will win and play back a spade, and you will go down. Leading the club queen from dummy covers some of the bases, but not enough, and it will not succeed today.

The key to the play is that the hand is about more than the club suit. If you can score two club tricks without losing the lead, you can switch your attack to hearts and come to three heart tricks and two in each of the other suits. Realizing this, Aker played a club to his ace followed by a club to the queen, and could then shift his attention to hearts when clubs failed to behave.

This line takes care of all 4-1 clubs except the singleton four or five with West.


It was very nice of your RHO to take you off the hook here. Had he passed, you would have been forced to rebid one no-trump, since this is the closest approximation — or least lie — to describe what you have. But now you can pass and await developments without having to distort your hand. Redouble here would show a better hand than this, by the way (or three trumps if playing support doubles).

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A
 J 10 4 2
 A K 9 6 2
♣ Q 6 2
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Dbl.
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work at hand. The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.

Alexander Graham Bell


N North
Both ♠ K 6
 A Q J 7 5
 Q 3
♣ K Q 8 3
West East
♠ 5 3 2
 9 8 4 2
 K 8 6 5 2
♣ 7
♠ J 9
 10 3
 A 10 7
♣ A J 9 6 5 4
South
♠ A Q 10 8 7 4
 K 6
 J 9 4
♣ 10 2
South West North East
    1 Pass
1 ♠ Pass 2 ♣ Pass
3 ♠ Pass 4 ♠ All pass
       

♣7

South at the Dyspeptics Club was somewhat disappointed to have roughly two aces less than his usual hand-strength, but he still managed to find a way to bid to game. The jump to three spades was invitational and justified only by the trump spots, and North had plenty in hand for his acceptance.

When West led his singleton club seven, declarer put up the king from dummy and dumped his 10 from hand to try to mislead East as to who had the singleton. However, East could see that a club ruff was the most likely way to beat the hand, so he returned the club four, suit preference. If West could ruff, East wanted him to lead diamonds next, the lowerranking side suit.

West happily ruffed in and trustingly led back the diamond five. When East took the ace, his winning continuation was unclear. If West had the diamond king, East needed to return a diamond; if South had the diamond king and West had started with Q-x-x in trumps, a third club was necessary to promote the setting trick in trumps. With a blind guess, he returned a third club. Declarer guessed to ruff high and draw trumps from the top to make his game. Which defender was more to blame?

West should have known that he had no trump honor to promote. He needs to lead the diamond king at trick three, then a second diamond. If East knows South will follow to a third club, he can overtake the king and play on clubs. Otherwise, he will let the diamond king hold.


You have a good hand, but no clear direction to head in and no real guarantee of a club fit. My instinct is to double, suggesting extras, and perhaps typically three diamonds. This is in the hope that partner will be able to convert the double to penalties or repeat one of the black suits if that is appropriate.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 6
 A Q J 7 5
 Q 3
♣ K Q 8 3
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Pass
2 ♣ Pass Pass 2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, November 13th, 2017

All you’re supposed to do is every once in a while give the boys a little tea and sympathy.

Robert Anderson


S North
E-W ♠ K Q 10 7 3
 A K 3
 A Q 7
♣ J 5
West East
♠ 6 5
 J 9 5
 J 9 4 2
♣ 10 9 8 6
♠ J 9 8 2
 10 8 4
 6 3
♣ 7 4 3 2
South
♠ A 4
 Q 7 6 2
 K 10 8 5
♣ A K Q
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Pass
2 NT Pass 4 ♣* Pass
4 ♠ Pass 7 NT All pass
       

*Gerber

♣10

At the table, I may not be good at extending sympathy to my partner, but at least I avoid open criticism. Had I been North here, I doubt I would have been able to offer condolences convincingly.

That player took only a slightly optimistic approach when he drove to the grand slam, reasonably confident that either diamonds or spades would run for declarer.

When West led the club 10, declarer could see 12 certain winners and had three suits where a 13th might materialize. Before you look at how play developed, think about how you would approach it.

At trick two, South tested the spades. It was only when East followed to the third round that declarer realized that he did not have a good discard from hand. Since diamonds looked more promising than hearts (because of the chance the jack might fall in two rounds), he let a heart go from hand. When the bad news in spades was combined with the fact that it was West who had diamond length, declarer was out of chances.

What should South have done differently? The key is to play the heart ace-king, cash the remaining clubs (pitching a heart from dummy), then take the heart queen, discarding a spade.

At this point, you can claim when hearts break. But if they had not split, you can decide whether to make the normal play of running spades from the top, or to play diamonds first, depending on what has happened in the other two suits.


On this dramatic auction, you have to assume declarer has a void somewhere (since Blackwood wasn’t used), but you have no sure way to know if declarer fits spades and is gambling with one suit unguarded. The most passive lead is a trump, but against small slams one tends to go active. Here, a heart feels right to me.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 3
 K J 9 5
 Q 5 2
♣ 10 8 6 4
South West North East
Pass 1 ♠ Pass 2 ♣
Pass 2 ♠ Pass 6 ♣
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, November 12th, 2017

When is it right to signal count on the first round of a suit that partner leads? What about on subsequent rounds, after you have played third hand high on your first turn, thus partner does not know about your length?

Number Cruncher, Selma, Ala.

At trick one, signal count when you can’t beat a jack or lower card played from dummy, or when your partner knows that you like the lead because his card will hold the trick, marking you with the missing high cards. Subsequently, if giving count, look at your remaining cards (not your original holding) and play high-low from even, low from odd. Sometimes, though, suit-preference may be more important in these positions; that is a thorny question.

If you held ♠ A-9-4,  Q-J-3-2,  K-J-3-2, ♣ 5-3, what would you lead against the unopposed sequence of one no-trump to your right, passed out, or one no-trump – three no-trump?

Opening Night, Fayetteville, N.C.

A top heart might work if both the ace and king are to your right and declarer or dummy has the 10. But a low heart will generally work better in almost every other case, so I would go with the heart two.

Please give your readers some idea of how you would mentally prepare for a tournament. Likewise, how did you physically prepare?

Red Setter, San Luis Obispo, Calif.

Mentally: Other than staying fit and rested, try not to eat too much before the game or between sessions. Try to get rest before the second session. Don’t go through the hands till after the game. Drink minimally, even after the game. Physically: I was never one for exercising too much. Read the system notes!

I assume you would double a one-diamond opening to your right in pretty much every position and vulnerability with ♠ A-3-2,  K-J-5-3,  9-4, ♣ K-J-8-2. If you do so, your partner cue-bids two diamonds and the next hand doubles. Do you have any partnership agreements about how to proceed in terms of showing majors, or whether bids are a maximum or minimum?

House Martin, Black Oak, Ark.

I’d bid a cheap major if I could, unless I thought there was a real positional gain to be had from making partner declarer. There could be here! So, to me, pass suggests a hand where I want partner to be declarer or I do not have a major. I realize that if they re-raise diamonds, I might regret my choice.

At a recent event, I was declarer, and we were down to the last three cards when my RHO put his cards away, which I assumed meant I had the rest. So I did the same. But my LHO argued the claim, and the tournament director told me that both opponents have to concede the tricks. Isn’t there an ethical issue if an opponent with no chance for tricks could inform his partner he had nothing, to help him defend?

Stickleback, Fredericksburg, Va.

You are right about most aspects of this. The concession is not binding on a defender’s partner, but it does give unauthorized information. Indeed, one defender might indeed learn the position of a card from his partner’s concession. In case of doubt, any trick in dispute goes to the non-offender here.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, November 11th, 2017

You learn so much from taking chances, whether they work out or not. Either way, you can grow from the experience and become stronger and smarter.

John Legend


S North
Both ♠ 5 2
 8 6 3
 J 9 7 5 4 2
♣ A 7
West East
♠ 10 7 3
 A 10 9 7 4
 3
♣ K 6 5 2
♠ K J 9
 5 2
 Q 10 8 6
♣ J 10 9 3
South
♠ A Q 8 6 4
 K Q J
 A K
♣ Q 8 4
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
       

10

In today’s deal, you have two chances to bring home your game. One of them is obvious and easy to quantify; the other is less easy to spot. See if you can take full advantage of your opportunities.

Against three no-trump, West leads the heart 10, and you take the first trick in hand. Your first and best chance is in diamonds. You cash the diamond ace and king, hoping the queen will drop, in which case life will be very straightforward. But there is no good news today, as West discards a heart. Can you see how you might find a second chance to bring home the game?

Your only realistic chance is to find spades 3-3 with the king onside. But beware! If you cross to the club ace and finesse in spades, then play two further rounds of that suit, East might see he should win and shift to clubs; the defense would then prevail.

So the first play in spades must be low from hand. East’s best play is to win and shift to the club jack. You duck in hand and take the trick with dummy’s ace. Then you lead a spade to the queen, cash the spade ace and run spades. Eventually, you exit with the heart king.

At this point, the defenders have four top tricks, but when West wins his heart ace, he can do no better than exit in hearts and force you to concede the last two tricks twice over. Before that happens, you will have nine tricks in the bank.


If you learn only one thing today, remember that in almost all auctions where a hand that has already passed balances with a double, a response of two no-trump, as here, is not natural. This call asks partner to bid his better minor. The logic is that if you had a one-suiter, you would bid it; if you had a spade stack, you would defend two spades doubled. So this is a cry for help: “Get me out of here, please!”

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 9
 5 2
 Q 10 8 6
♣ J 10 9 3
South West North East
Pass 1 ♠ Pass 2 ♠
Pass Pass Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, November 10th, 2017

There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly.

R. Buckminster Fuller


S North
E-W ♠ A K Q 3
 A K J 10
 8 2
♣ A Q J
West East
♠ 9
 Q 8 6 5
 A K Q J 10 4
♣ K 4
♠ 10 8 7 4 2
 4
 7 6 3
♣ 9 7 6 3
South
♠ J 6 5
 9 7 3 2
 9 5
♣ 10 8 5 2
South West North East
Pass 1 Dbl. Pass
1 2 4 All pass
       

K

In today’s deal, North forced South to respond to his take-out double, then jumped to game at once, hoping his partner did not have a complete bust. He was disappointed in that regard, but the game still had decent play.

West would have done best to cash two diamonds and exit passively in spades. Declarer would then have had to read the position very precisely to come home. But it was tempting for West to lead a third diamond, hoping to shorten declarer or dummy. When he did that, South ruffed in hand and immediately took the club finesse.

Once the finesse succeeded, declarer’s only problem was how to draw trumps safely.

It would have been fatal to draw trumps by leading the ace and king, followed by the jack. West would have won the third round, and at that point, South would be out of trumps. West would then have led another diamond to force out dummy’s last trump, and declarer would lose control of the hand.

But South smelled a rat from the earlier defense, and instead simply drew one round of trumps with the ace, then gave up a trump trick. If West had ducked, dummy would have cashed the heart king and run his winners in spades and clubs, leaving West with one trump trick.

But when West took the heart queen, and led a fourth diamond, South still had a trump to ruff the diamond in hand. He could then lead a club to dummy, draw the trumps and claim.


This is a quantitative sequence; you have shown a balanced 22-24 or so, thus you have maximum hand for the auction and must bid on, despite the uncomfortable feeling engendered by your diamond holding. There is something to be said for bidding five no-trump — pick a slam — to get partner to bid suits up the line. He might, after all, have four small in one major.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A K Q 3
 A K J 10
 8 2
♣ A Q J
South West North East
2 ♣ Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 4 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, November 9th, 2017

The only sure thing about luck is that it will change.

Bret Harte


S North
None ♠ A K J 8
 A Q 7 4 2
 K J 3
♣ 4
West East
♠ 6 5
 9 8 6 5 3
 A 4
♣ Q 7 6 5
♠ 9 7 2
 K 10
 Q 10 9 7 5 2
♣ 10 9
South
♠ Q 10 4 3
 J
 8 6
♣ A K J 8 3 2
South West North East
2 ♣ Pass 2 * Pass
2 ♠ Pass 2 NT* Pass
3 ♠ Pass 4 Pass
4 ♠ Pass 4 NT Pass
5 ♣ Pass 6 ♠ All pass

*Relay

Your call

The idea of underleading an ace against a slam is one that appeals to the true gambler. The possibility that you might lose the ace if you don’t take it is dangerous enough that, even when the opportunity arises, few players will take advantage of the chance.

However, in Opatija, Croatia, three years ago in the European Championships, Tommy Garvey seized his chance for an underlead during Ireland’s match against Russia in the Open Series.

South had shown a limited hand with clubs and spades and no extra values, then admitted to one key-card in response to Blackwood. The auction had made it clear that North held a diamond control, which in the light of Garvey’s hand was likely to be the king rather than shortage.

If dummy held the king plus the queen, or no secondary honor, underleading the ace could prove very costly, especially if South held a singleton diamond. Also, declarer might subsequently discard a diamond loser on dummy’s hearts. None of this was especially unlikely, since declarer had at least nine cards in the black suits. But if dummy held both the king and jack of diamonds, the gamble might succeed.

Garvey went for the gusto and led the diamond four to trick one. Although he might have suspected something was afoot, declarer had no reason not to put in the jack. John Carroll produced the queen and returned a diamond to set the slam with the first two tricks. That resulted in a slam swing to Ireland.


I could understand bidding three clubs to preempt the opponents out of the auction, but you actually have a fair chance that this is your hand, not theirs, particularly because you have the boss suit, spades. So I would just overcall two clubs, hoping to get a second chance to describe my hand.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 10 4 3
 J
 8 6
♣ A K J 8 3 2
South West North East
    Pass 1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, November 8th, 2017

Most writers regard the truth as their most valuable possession, and therefore are most economical in its use.

Mark Twain


S North
Both ♠ 4 3 2
 10 5
 K 8 7
♣ Q J 8 3 2
West East
♠ K 9 8 5
 8 4
 J 10 9 6
♣ A 10 5
♠ 6
 9 7 6 3
 A 4 3 2
♣ K 9 7 6
South
♠ A Q J 10 7
 A K Q J 2
 Q 5
♣ 4
South West North East
1 ♠ Pass 1 NT Pass
3 Pass 3 ♠ Pass
4 Pass 4 ♠ All pass
       

J

Too many competent players boast that they have never read a bridge book in their lives. As someone who works as a writer, I am always surprised at how many basic positions are missed by players who might have encountered that very position in a book. A little learning may be a dangerous thing, but zero learning tends to work even worse.

In today’s deal, South offered a choice of games at the four-level, and North’s return to four spades ended the auction. West led the diamond jack, and South tried to make East’s task as hard as he could when he put up the king.

East won and shifted to a club, hoping somewhat optimistically that his side could take two club tricks, and that West would turn up with a winner in one of the major suits as well.

West won with his ace and returned a club, but it was to no avail. Dummy’s queen was covered by the king and ruffed. When West got in with his spade king, there was no hope for the defense — declarer was in complete control.

East should have reasoned that West was likely to hold four trumps. Instead of leading back the club six, he might have tried broaching clubs by leading the king. Then the defenders would have been in business. Declarer is immediately shortened in trumps on the second round of clubs (which he has to ruff). When West gets in with the spade king, West can force him again by leading the club ace, to ensure a second trump trick for his side.


Did you pass, grateful to be taken off the hook? That would be a very cowardly attitude. This hand is full value for a two-club call. Partner asked you to bid, and you have a reasonable suit and decent values. There is no reason not to dive into the auction to compete the part-score.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 4 3 2
 10 5
 K 8 7
♣ Q J 8 3 2
South West North East
Pass 1 ♠ Dbl. 1 NT
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.