Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, April 21st, 2018

The task is, not so much to see what no one has yet seen; but to think what nobody has yet thought, about that which everybody sees.

Erwin Schrodinger


S North
Both ♠ 10 9 3
 Q J 4 3
 Q 8 4
♣ Q 10 6
West East
♠ 7
 10 8 5
 9 5 3 2
♣ A K J 9 4
♠ J 6 4 2
 A K 9
 6
♣ 8 7 5 3 2
South
♠ A K Q 8 5
 7 6 2
 A K J 10 7
♣ —
South West North East
1 ♠ Pass 2 ♠ Pass
4 ♠ All pass    

♣K

Has it ever occurred to you that the act of setting bridge problems has something in common with Schrodinger’s Cat? I thought not. Maybe that is too eggheaded a comparison, but there is something to be said for the idea that solving a problem written down on paper is not the same as doing so at the table, because by giving someone a problem and making them aware that there is a catch, it ceases to be as much of a problem.

Enough of such nonsense: let us look at today’s deal, where I suspect if you were to encounter the hand at the table in four spades, a sizeable percentage of the population would ruff the opening lead and draw trumps, expecting to be able to claim 10 winners. But in problem-land, as opposed to real life, wouldn’t you expect something to be rotten in the state of Denmark?

If trumps are 4-1 with West having the length, you appear to be in deep trouble. What happens if it is East who has the long trump, with diamonds also breaking in unfriendly fashion? To solve the problem of transportation between your two hands, ruff the club king, then cash the spade ace, unblocking dummy’s spade nine. Take the spade king, unblocking the spade 10 from the board, and lead a diamond to the queen. You can next finesse the spade eight, draw the last trump and claim.


Facing a direct double, you would bid two hearts now; but the range for a balancing double is somewhat lower, so a free bid here should be a slightly better hand than this. You can pass, relying on your partner to reopen if he has real extras. If the opponents go back to two diamonds, you can balance with two hearts. I’d bid two hearts with the heart king instead of the queen, so it is very close.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 9 3
 Q J 4 3
 Q 8 4
♣ Q 10 6
South West North East
      1
Pass Pass Dbl. 1 ♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, April 20th, 2018

I never met any man in my life who could not bear another’s misfortunes perfectly like a Christian.

Alexander Pope


W North
None ♠ —
 A K Q
 A Q 10 6 4
♣ K 8 7 3 2
West East
♠ K Q 7 6 5 3
 7 6 4
 K 7
♣ J 6
♠ A 2
 J 10 9 3
 9 8 5 3
♣ A 10 5
South
♠ J 10 9 8 4
 8 5 2
 J 2
♣ Q 9 4
South West North East
  2 ♠ 3 ♠ * Dbl.
4 ♣ Pass 4 ♠ Pass
5 ♣ All pass    

*Minors

♠K

One of the countries that is fast rising to prominence at the North American Championships is Turkey. Here is Turkey’s Zeynep Yilmaz at the 2014 spring competition.

Against five clubs, West led the spade king, ruffed low in dummy. Yilmaz played a low club to the five, queen and six. Unless East had started with an unlikely doubleton club ace, declarer expected two trump losers; therefore, he would require the diamond king to be onside. But Yilmaz also expected a 4-2 diamond break, not only because that is the most likely distribution in abstract within the suit, but also because of West’s known six-card spade suit.

To come home in his game, he would need to be able to ruff the third round of diamonds with his club nine. Therefore East had to hold the doubleton club ace, or West must have begun with the doubleton club jack.

When Yilmaz advanced the diamond jack, it was covered by the king and ace. Yilmaz now played a low trump from dummy. East could not afford to rise with the ace and return a trump, as he would give up his second trump trick in the process. So he followed with the 10, won by West with the jack. Whatever West returned would be won in dummy, and a diamond could safely be ruffed with the trump nine.

Note that, in theory, it doesn’t help West to unblock the trump jack under the queen, since declarer could change tack and ruff a diamond high before playing the second trump.


A double here by you is for take-out. Yes, you might have more shape or even more values than this for the call, but in any form of scoring, you want to get back into the auction when the opponents have found a fit at a low level. You hope that if your partner bids, he will have either a sixth spade or a second suit. If not, a 4-3 fit should play just fine.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 2
 J 10 9 3
 9 8 5 3
♣ A 10 5
South West North East
  1 ♣ 1 ♠ 2 ♣
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, April 19th, 2018

To be totally understanding makes one very indulgent.

Madame de Stael


E North
Both ♠ 10 9 8 7 4 3 2
 A K 5
 7 3
♣ 2
West East
♠ K 5
 J 10 9 8 7 4
 K 5 4
♣ K J
♠ A J 6
 Q 6 2
 Q 10 9 8 2
♣ 9 6
South
♠ Q
 3
 A J 6
♣ A Q 10 8 7 5 4 3
South West North East
      Pass
1 ♣ 2 2 ♠ 3
5 ♣ All pass    

J

Today’s deal is a relatively simple one from a recent Australian national event. Both tables bid the hand to five clubs by South, and at each table, the lead was the heart jack. However, one declarer looked further into the hand than did his counterpart, and he was suitably rewarded.

Where the unsuccessful declarer was at the helm, he won the opening lead and made haste to pitch his spade loser on the top heart. Then he played on trumps and could not avoid losing three tricks in the minors when clubs failed to behave.

David Beauchamp was South in the other room, and he also received the lead of the heart jack. However, after taking his two heart winners to pitch the spade loser, he tried a diamond to the jack and king.

If anything but a trump came back, declarer’s plan was to ruff a diamond in dummy, then lead trumps from the top, with something like a 2 in 3 chance of playing clubs for one loser. West continued hearts, so declarer duly put that plan into effect. If, however, West had shifted to trumps, Beauchamp would have brought the whole club suit in with no loser, so he would have come to 11 tricks in a different fashion.

This deal exemplifies the adage that there is no suit you are better off leading yourself than forcing the opponents to play it for you. Let them do the heavy lifting, and you will be pleased by the results.


A simple raise to three hearts takes away a useful level of bidding from the opponents. Yes, you could bid three diamonds as a lead director with heart fit (whether a passed or unpassed hand), but your suit isn’t really good enough for that. Make the diamond queen the king, and you might get away with making that call.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A J 6
 Q 6 2
 Q 10 9 8 2
♣ 9 6
South West North East
  Pass 2 Dbl.
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, April 18th, 2018

There is no mode of action, no form of emotion, that we do not share with the lower animals. It is only by language that we rise above them, or above each other — by language, which is the parent, and not the child, of thought.

Oscar Wilde


N North
N-S ♠ Q 8 2
 K J 4
 5 4 3
♣ A Q J 10
West East
♠ 9 4
 10 6 5
 Q J 10 8
♣ 9 7 3 2
♠ 7 6
 A Q 7 3
 K 9 7 2
♣ K 5 4
South
♠ A K J 10 5 3
 9 8 2
 A 6
♣ 8 6
South West North East
    1 ♣ Pass
1 ♠ Pass 1 NT Pass
4 ♠ All pass    

Q

Kit Woolsey’s latest book, “The Language of Bridge” covers a lot of ground. One of the topics discussed is how to help your partner do the right thing, as well as instructing you when to make the decision for the partnership if you know what is appropriate.

Here, after North has shown a balanced 12-14 points and you have discreetly decided to stay out of the proceedings, your partner leads the diamond queen against South’s four spades. You can see your own hand as East, plus the dummy, and the route to four tricks on defense may seem straightforward.

Defeating the contract should be simple, assuming declarer wins the first diamond, draws trumps and loses a club finesse. You will underlead your diamond king, and partner can put a heart through.

But can you see a potential problem? Declarer might sneakily duck the first round of diamonds. If you have encouraged, partner will not think to shift to a heart — why would he, since you might have king-third of diamonds and no heart queen? After a diamond continuation, the defense is kaput since West no longer has an entry for the heart play.

The secret is that you must discourage with the diamond two at trick one, even though you are happy with the lead. Now if declarer ducks, partner will know to shift to a heart.

Moral: it is worth remembering that attitude signals relate to the whole hand, not just the suit led.


Some people play a redouble here as a good hand, short in spades; others treat it as a support redouble, guaranteeing precisely three spades, with a raise promising four trumps. I’m on the fence on this issue, so I won’t urge you to go one way or the other, but you should be aware of the options.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 8 2
 K J 4
 5 4 3
♣ A Q J 10
South West North East
1 ♣ Pass 1 ♠ Dbl.
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Danger, Will Robinson!

The Robot


S North
Both ♠ A 9 8 6
 K J
 K 6 5 2
♣ A 8 3
West East
♠ J 2
 10 4 3
 Q 7 4
♣ K Q J 9 5
♠ Q 10 7 5
 Q 9 8 5 2
 10
♣ 7 4 2
South
♠ K 4 3
 A 7 6
 A J 9 8 3
♣ 10 6
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
       

♣K

The opportunity for an avoidance play presents itself when you can determine that one of the opponents is the danger hand, either because he has winners to cash or because he might lead a suit that would put your contract in jeopardy, whereas his partner cannot make those plays.

In such scenarios, you should be prepared to invest a trick to achieve your target, or to maximize your chances of keeping the feared opponent off play.

Today’s deal is just such an example; the easy part of the problem is to determine which one is the danger hand; once you have done that, the avoidance play should come easily.

Would you raise one spade to two as South at your second turn? I could go either way. But let’s say you choose the rebid of one no-trump and end up in three no-trump on a top club lead. Good technique is to duck two clubs, trying to cut the defenders’ communications. Having won the third club, you can see your way home in three no-trump even if you only emerge with four diamond tricks — as long as you keep West, the presumed danger hand, off lead.

The way to do this is to lead towards the diamond ace from hand. If West has Q-10-x of diamonds, there is nothing you can do. But if East has the singleton 10, it will appear at once. You can then successfully pass the diamond jack and keep West off play. Even if you lose to the doubleton diamond queen in East, that would constitute very cheap insurance.


In a normal competitive two-over-one auction, a call of two no-trump here would not be forcing. Today, though, your partner’s bid of two spades shows extras and sets up a game-force, so there is no need for you to take up space by jumping to game. Simply bid two no-trump and let your partner do something more extravagant if he has extras. Otherwise, you will play three no-trump.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 4 3
 A 7 6
 A J 9 8 3
♣ 10 6
South West North East
    1 ♣ 1 ♠
2 Pass 2 ♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, April 16th, 2018

The salvation of mankind lies only in making everything the concern of all.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn


S North
None ♠ 7 6 4
 7 4 3
 A K 6 5 2
♣ 7 4
West East
♠ J 8 5
 J 10 2
 Q 10 8 7
♣ 10 9 3
♠ Q 10 3 2
 Q 9 8 6
 J
♣ Q J 8 5
South
♠ A K 9
 A K 5
 9 4 3
♣ A K 6 2
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
       

J

It is a theme that bears repeating that when playing teams or rubber bridge, your main focus as declarer must be on making your contract whenever possible. Meanwhile, as a defender, the number of overtricks or undertricks is less critical than trying to beat the contract. Today’s deal is a fine example of needing to keep your eye on the ball. To make your contract of three no-trump, you must come to nine tricks; the 10th trick is far less important. With that huge clue, put yourself in declarer’s place and cover up the East and West cards. You are playing three no-trump on the lead of the heart jack.

The first point is that you should win the opening lead because you would not like it if the defenders shifted to clubs or spades at trick two. So you take the heart and duck a diamond; since you have to lose a diamond, you must retain communications if you can.

East overtakes his partner’s diamond seven to play a second heart. You duck the trick and win the third heart, as everyone follows, then lead a second diamond. When West deviously follows with the queen, it would be natural, but fatal, to assume that the suit was breaking, and to put up the king. If you do, you will limit yourself to two diamond tricks, and the contract can no longer be made. Duck the second diamond, and you will take three diamond tricks and two winners in each of the other suits.


There is no reason to lead anything but a heart here. And you should lead a small heart, not an honor, since if declarer has honor-jack-third of hearts, leading the queen turns his single stopper into a double stopper. Typically, it’s best to lead low from honor-third unless you think you may need to unblock the suit.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 6 2
 Q 8 3
 J 8
♣ Q 10 8 4 3
South West North East
Pass 1 1 1 ♠
2 3 ♣ pass 3 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, April 15th, 2018

In these days of aggressive pre-empts, when is it right to go low, and when to try for game? Specifically, facing a non-vulnerable three-club call in first seat, what would you do with ♠ K-10-2,  K-Q-7-6,  A-Q-7-4, ♣ J-4? When my partner, opened three clubs at favorable vulnerability, what action would you advise?

Playing Safe, Saint John, New Brunswick

This is more about style than anything else. It is not clear that you will make game facing any seven-card club suit without the ace, and even if your partner has that card and clubs run for one loser, either spades or hearts might prove vulnerable. At this vulnerability, I would pass facing any but the soundest of pre-empters.

Where does the ACBL currently stand in terms of international bridge? When was the last time we won a major world title, and who are the up-and-coming stars?

Jingle Bells, Worcester, Mass.

The open team won the last world championship, and the juniors have a very strong crop, but our women’s team seems to be at a slight ebb. That said, Sylvia Shi has just moved from the juniors to the women’s team, and I expect great things of her. In the junior game, two strong pairs I know are Ben Kristensen and Kevin Rosenberg, and Adam and Zach Grossack.

Recently you ran a deal showing a hand on which you advocated using “Crawling Stayman.” How would you handle a similar situation holding the same distribution of 4-5 in the majors, but with approximately invitational values — say about an 8-count?

Majority Rules, Columbia, S.C.

For completeness, let me first address hands with game-going values and 5-4 in the majors. Stayman, then jumping (over a two-diamond response) in the four-card major gets you to the 5-3 fit — if there is one — transferred to the stronger hand. This approach is known as Smolen. If you wish to invite game, start with Stayman, but then you might follow up with two no-trump. Transferring to hearts, then bidding spades is played as invitational by some.

What is the rule about overcalling one no-trump over a short club or Precision one diamond, which might be only two cards? Specifically, what is the critical factor in terms of stoppers in their suit, or even concealing a five-card major of your own?

Winning Ugly, Carmel, Calif.

I draw the line at concealing a good five-card major in a no-trump overcall, especially if my stopper in the suit they have named is weak. But sometimes (especially over a two-card minor), I might overcall one no-trump with a balanced hand and three small in their suit. Let them work out what to lead, the price of their ambiguous opening call.

After the death of Omar Sharif, who are the highest-profile bridge players from worlds other than the professional circuit?

Publicity Hound, Raleigh, N.C.

The answer must surely be Bill Gates and Warren Buffett. If we can’t make them into headliners (and sometimes I wonder what the ACBL promotion team is doing), then we might as well give up and go home.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, April 14th, 2018

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

Anonymous


W North
E-W ♠ 5 4 3
 9 7 4
 K Q 10 7 6
♣ A 3
West East
♠ A J 7 6 2
 5
 A J 5 4
♣ Q 10 9
♠ Q 9
 Q J 6 3
 9 8 2
♣ 6 5 4 2
South
♠ K 10 8
 A K 10 8 2
 3
♣ K J 8 7
South West North East
  1 ♠ Pass 1 NT
2 Pass 3 Pass
4 All pass    

♣10

Today’s deal comes from the qualifying event of last year’s Gold Coast teams in Brisbane, Australia. It cropped up at the table where Matt Mullamphy and Ron Klinger took on Grant Cowen and Paul McGrath. On a quiet set of boards, where there were few opportunities for swing, this significant opportunity went begging.

At the table North had elected to pass two hearts, pessimistically downvaluing his weak trumps and poorly placed spades. It was a good decision in a sense — since in practice four hearts was likely to go down. But can you spot the line where South in the other room could have made his game, after a friendly club lead into the tenace?

When, as South, you lead a diamond at trick two, West must duck. You win dummy’s queen, then ruff a diamond, cross to the club ace and ruff a second diamond. When no ace appears, you know West surely started with 5=1=4=3 shape. So you cash the heart ace to confirm that your count on the hand is correct, then take the club king and ruff your club winner in dummy.

You have scored the first eight tricks, with the lead in dummy, having reduced yourself down to the K-10 of hearts while your RHO has Q-J-6. Dummy has two diamonds, and you and dummy each have three spades left.

At trick nine, you lead a diamond from dummy; East must ruff high to prevent you from scoring your heart 10. Instead of over-ruffing, you simply pitch a spade and will now score two more trump tricks by force.


The double by West typically asks East to try to lead his partner’s major and is based on a good suit. Do you want to risk playing three no-trump doubled under those circumstances? I’m a coward; I’d run to four diamonds and apologize if that is wrong.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 5 4 3
 9 7 4
 K Q 10 7 6
♣ A 3
South West North East
    1 NT Pass
3 NT Dbl. Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, April 13th, 2018

Use harms and even destroys beauty. The noblest function of an object is to be contemplated.

Miguel de Unamuno


E North
Both ♠ K J 3
 10 5 2
 A Q 4
♣ A 10 8 4
West East
♠ 8
 A 9
 K 9 8 7 5 2
♣ K Q 7 2
♠ Q 10 9 5 4
 K 8 6 4
 10 6
♣ J 9
South
♠ A 7 6 2
 Q J 7 3
 J 3
♣ 6 5 3
South West North East
      Pass
Pass 1 Dbl. 1
1 ♠ 2 ♣ Pass 2
2 All pass    

♣K

In the last session of the Pairs Final from the Gold Coast tournament last year, both Lilley-Nagy and Howard-Nunn did well here in their contracts of two hearts.

As North, on the auction shown, David Lilley judged his partner would not have five spades, but might have five hearts, so let his partner play two hearts. Justin Howard, as South, overcalled two hearts over East’s initial one-spade response and played there.

Zolly Nagy won the top club lead, led a spade to the ace and played a low heart from hand. West flew up with the ace to play the club queen, crashing the jack, then gave his partner a club ruff. When East returned a spade for his partner to ruff, that was the fourth defensive trick, but the heart king was their last trick.

Howard received a far tougher defense. He won the spade lead in hand and led a second spade. West discarded a diamond, so declarer won the king and played a third spade. East took the queen (West pitching another diamond), and the defenders now played three rounds of trumps. When Howard drew the last trump, West had to pitch a club. When he let go a small one, Howard led a club up and ducked West’s queen.

West had to exit with a low club, and Howard won the ace and played a third club, forcing West to win and lead diamonds. Whichever diamond he played, Howard had the rest, since dummy’s club was good.

On the last trump, West had to find the discard of a club honor to avoid the endplay.


You may feel like you are being stolen from, but you just do not have the shape to double for take-out. You must pass as smoothly as possible, relying on your partner to reopen with short hearts or real shape of his own. As a passed hand, he should bid in either scenario, regardless of whether he is close to an opening bid here.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 3
 10 5 2
 A Q 4
♣ A 10 8 4
South West North East
  Pass Pass 3
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, April 12th, 2018

Curtsy while you’re thinking what to say. It saves time.

Lewis Carroll


S North
Both ♠ K 6 2
 K 7 3
 A K 6
♣ A Q 3 2
West East
♠ J 4 3
 9 8 2
 J 2
♣ J 8 6 5 4
♠ A 7 5
 10 6 5
 10 9 8 7 4 3
♣ 7
South
♠ Q 10 9 8
 A Q J 4
 Q 5
♣ K 10 9
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 ♣ Pass
2 Pass 3 ♣ Pass
3 ♠ Pass 6 NT All pass
       

J

Today’s deal comes from the 2017 Gold Coast tournament, held in Brisbane, Australia. It originally appeared with the headline “Neill before the president!”

Avi Kanetkar wrote up the deal from the finals of the pairs events, which was very nicely defended by the Australian Bridge Federation president, Bruce Neill. When South opened a strong (14-17) no-trump, North took his side to six no-trump, exploring for a minor-suit fit along the way.

When Kanetkar led the diamond jack against the slam, declarer had 11 tricks and needed to develop an additional trick from the black suits. South won in hand to lead a spade to the king, which Neill smoothly ducked. Now declarer cashed hearts (Kanetkar pitching a club) before playing the club queen and ace.

Had clubs split, declarer could have cashed four tricks in the minors. As it was, when Neill discarded and the 5-1 club break came to light, it seemed entirely logical to lead a spade to the 10. And that was down one.

Had East won the spade ace, then no matter what suit he returned, declarer would probably have cashed the spade queen and played either for clubs to behave or for the same hand to hold the spade jack and club length. It is worth noting that East does best to return a spade if he began with the ace-jack, trying to persuade declarer to commit himself either to spades or clubs, rather than allowing him to combine his chances.


Your cue-bid has set up a forcing auction as far as suit agreement. So you can bid two hearts now, knowing that partner must bid again. His raise to three hearts or a rebid of two no-trump would not be forcing, but you would bid on of course. For the record, facing a passed hand, you might need to do more if you wanted to force to game with an appropriate hand of your own.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 10 9 8
 A Q J 4
 Q 5
♣ K 10 9
South West North East
  1 ♣ Dbl. Pass
2 ♣ Pass 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2018. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.