Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, September 7th, 2017

Be not angry that you cannot make others as you wish them to be, since you cannot make yourself as you wish to be.

Thomas a Kempis


N North
E-W ♠ K Q 10
 3
 K Q 10 4 2
♣ A Q 5 2
West East
♠ 9 8 3 2
 J 9 7 2
 7 6
♣ J 9 7
♠ 6 5
 K Q 10 8 4
 A 8 5
♣ K 8 4
South
♠ A J 7 4
 A 6 5
 J 9 3
♣ 10 6 3
South West North East
    1 1
Dbl. Pass 2 Pass
3 Pass 3 Pass
3 ♠ Pass 4 ♠ All pass
       

2

North-South had done well to maneuver themselves out of three no-trump or five diamonds, but four spades was hardly a bed of roses.

At the table declarer won the first heart lead and led a diamond to the king. East ducked, won the second diamond, and had a real problem. Did his partner have a possible trump trick or four small spades? Eventually he gave his partner a diamond ruff (the correct defense, since if West had jack-fourth of spades and no club jack, he could revert to hearts and eventually build a second trump trick for himself). When West took the diamond ruff he also took his time before finding the best defense, a trump exit. Now declarer had eight top winners, but no way to take a heart ruff and draw trump, or to set up clubs without losing two tricks in the process.

Declarer’s safest play would have been to duck the heart ace and let the defenders win the first trick. He needs to knock out the diamond ace while keeping hearts under control, and if the adverse trumps are split 4-2, a heart force of South’s hand would be embarrassing. The simplest plan is to invest a heart trick, letting North, the hand with the shorter trumps, take care of subsequent rounds of hearts, if need be. Then trumps can be drawn, if necessary in four rounds, and diamonds established. Four trumps, four diamonds, and two side aces would make the game without any need for heart ruffs or club finesses.


You might make a responsive double, converting a three heart response to three spades (suggesting a better hand than bidding three spades directly). The problem with that action is that if partner instead bids three spades over your double, you won’t know what to do. I think nonetheless that double is right, planning to pass a three spade response and relying on partner to do more if he has extras.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A J 7 4
 A 6 5
 J 9 3
♣ 10 6 3
South West North East
Pass 2 Dbl. 3
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

Most roads lead men homewards, My road leads me forth.

John Masefield


S North
N-S ♠ A K J 9
 A J 5
 A K 4
♣ 7 5 2
West East
♠ 7
 9 7 6 3 2
 Q 10 7 5
♣ K 10 8
♠ 10 8 6 4 3
 Q 8 4
 2
♣ J 9 4 3
South
♠ Q 5 2
 K 10
 J 9 8 6 3
♣ A Q 6
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 6 NT All pass
       

7

Consider in abstract how to play today’s diamond suit of J-98-6-3 facing A-K-4 to give yourself the best chance of four tricks? Best is to cash the ace, in case an honor falls, then cross back to the other hand in a second suit, and lead the nine, letting it run unless the next opponent shows out.

Now look at today’s deal, where South ended in six no-trump and West led the heart three. Declarer needed to generate two extra tricks from diamonds, so he played low from the table and won East’s queen with the king. A top diamond saw both opponents follow suit, but only now did declarer realize he was short of the entries to hand that he needed for the safety play in diamonds.

He was therefore reduced to playing off the second top diamond, hoping for the suit to break. However, when East showed out, the contract was doomed.

Declarer had exactly the right idea, but had miscalculated the entries needed to the South hand. Try the effect of the heart jack from dummy at the first trick. Whether East can cover or not, declarer has ensured an extra entry to hand when he needs it.

He now cashes a top diamond, comes to hand with a heart, and leads the diamond nine. West plays low and, as planned, declarer follows low from dummy. If it loses, he can claim the balance. When the nine wins, he can cash dummy’s diamond winner, return to hand with the spade queen, and force out the diamond queen to claim 12 tricks.


Do you see my megaphone? I am about to speak very loudly and clearly. Never overcall at the two-level in direct seat on a suit like this. A take-out double may lead to your missing a 5-3 diamond fit, but that is hardly the end of the world. Conversely, overcalling here may get you into all kinds of trouble. I would pass a one spade opener, by the way, considering there to be no serious second choice.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 5 2
 K 10
 J 9 8 6 3
♣ A Q 6
South West North East
    Pass 1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

Human speech is like a cracked kettle on which we tap rhythms for bears to dance to.

Gustave Flaubert


S North
Both ♠ J 10 7 5 4
 6 4 2
 Q 6 4
♣ K 4
West East
♠ A Q 9
 10
 10 5 3 2
♣ Q J 10 9 7
♠ K 8 3 2
 8 7 5
 K J 8 7
♣ 5 2
South
♠ 6
 A K Q J 9 3
 A 9
♣ A 8 6 3
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Pass
3 ♣ Pass 3 Pass
4 All pass    

♣Q

Goldilocks has now completed her training at bridge, and has advanced to competing at the duplicate. Papa Bear expansively invited her to partner him, “So she could see how the experts play.” Keeping her doubts under firm check, Goldilocks accepted with as much grace as she could, and was privileged to watch him get his paws on the dummy, often with singular lack of success. In four hearts, he won the opening club lead in dummy, led a club to the ace, and tried to ruff a club in dummy. East over-ruffed and led a spade to his partner. A fourth club sank the contract without trace, when East could over-ruff.

Mama Bear improved on that line at her table. She won the club lead in dummy to lead a club to her hand, then ducked a spade to cut the defenders’ communications for immediate ruffs. Now when a third club came through she ruffed in dummy and was over-ruffed, but she was still in decent shape. She would have survived had trumps broken, or had East held a singleton. But not today.

Baby Bear showed how it should be done. The club queen went to the king, and he next led to the club ace. Now came a third club, throwing a diamond from dummy. When West led a fourth club, declarer threw a second diamond, rather than ruff.

West shifted to a diamond, and declarer won in hand, drew two rounds of trump then ruffed his diamond loser in dummy for his 10th trick.


You have a stark choice here. Pass the two no-trump opening bid or transfer into spades, after which you can pass, or offer a choice of games with a call of three no-trump. I prefer to start with a transfer, but I would plan to pass the completion of the transfer. This doesn’t have to be right; however, since partner can always break the transfer with a super fit, I’ll settle for partscore if he doesn’t.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ J 10 7 5 4
 6 4 2
 Q 6 4
♣ 8 4
South West North East
  Pass 2 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, September 4th, 2017

In formal logic, a contradiction is the signal of defeat, but in the evolution of real knowledge it marks the first step in progress toward a victory.

Alfred North Whitehead


W North
Both ♠ A Q 4 3
 K 4 2
 Q 7 5
♣ Q 7 5
West East
♠ 8 6 5
 8
 J 10 6 4 2
♣ J 10 9 4
♠ 9
 A J 9 7 6 5
 A 9 3
♣ 8 6 3
South
♠ K J 10 7 2
 Q 10 3
 K 8
♣ A K 2
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♣ 1
1 ♠ Pass 2 ♠ Pass
4 ♠ All pass    

8

Congratulations if you managed to bid today’s hand to three no-trump. This is not at all easy to do, though maybe South should probe with three hearts over two spades, and now if North guesses to bid three no-trump South has an easy pass.

When West leads the heart eight against four spades, East cannot tell for sure whether his partner has one or two cards in the suit. But since it rates to be very difficult to beat the hand unless his partner has a singleton, he wins the ace and returns the suit, hoping for the best. South should follow with the heart 10 at the first trick in an attempt to confuse East, but it should not work. If South does follow with his low heart at his first turn, it makes East’s life easier, as now he can be sure that his partner does not have the doubleton eight-three.

Anyway, East gives his partner a ruff, West returns a diamond to his partner’s ace, gets a second ruff….. Whoa! How did West know to play back a diamond? There is an answer, but it is not obvious. The question of which minor suit ace East has is determined by the size of the heart East returns to give his partner the ruff. His play of the nine calls for the higher suit.

This suit preference signal (also known as Lavinthal, or as McKenney in England) would allow East to show the club ace instead by returning a low heart.


Partner has scattered values but has not joined in, so we can assume no heart fit. Is that enough reason to lead a different suit? I think so. The spade sequence is just enough reason to lead that suit, particularly because your RHO might well have bid spades if he had the right hand with a three-card suit. So I would lead the spade jack.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ J 10 8
 A J 7 4 3
 K 5
♣ J 9 3
South West North East
    Pass 1 ♣
1 Dbl. Pass 1 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, September 3rd, 2017

My partner has proposed we play Rosenkranz doubles to distinguish between hands on which advancer (overcaller’s partner) can raise his partner’s suit without a top honor, but can show a raise with a top honor by a double – or possibly a redouble. Where do you stand here?

Red Cross, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

I prefer to utilize the double to show a strong defensive hand rather than for a fit. These doubles are traditionally only used by fourth hand facing an overcall, and I can see the logic in using them in the way you describe if by a passed hand – but I would not advocate them in any other sequences.

Holding ♠ A-J-7-4-2,  K-9-7,  A-Q-9-7, ♣ 10, I opened one spade and heard my LHO overcall two clubs. My partner passed, but I felt he had broken tempo slightly before acting. When this came back to me what are my responsibilities in terms of passing bidding or doubling? For the record, my partner had a sixcount with the shape for a negative double but only a singleton spade; so we could make three in either red suit.

At the Table, White Plains, N.Y.

You were very ethical to consider this a problem. Many people would process the break subconsciously but not admit to it. Here, if you have what you consider a clear action (one to which there is no logical alternative) take it. In my opinion, doubling for take-out is that clear… change the diamond seven to the club seven and some would pass, so you may feel obliged to do so. I’d never bid two diamonds as opposed to doubling, by the way.

When opener hears his partner make a negative double, is a jump in a new suit forcing or invitational? If partner had responded, that jump would have been game forcing, right?

Raising the Roof, Raleigh, N.C.

When your partner asks you to bid a suit with a negative double, all minimum actions show that suit but deny extra values. A jump to the three-level simply says that you have the appropriate suit(s) and extra values, while jumping to two of a major after opening a minor and hearing a negative double of a red suit promises no more than the equivalent of raising a major shown by partner. With forcing hands, start with a cuebid or a more extravagant leap than a simple jump.

Could you please elaborate on a complete structure over an opening bid of two no-trump? I’m assuming Stayman, and transfers to the majors at the three- and four-level.

Patterning Out, Madison, Wis.

A raise to three no-trump is to play, of course, with regular Stayman, transfers and Texas transfers to the majors. You can play a jump to four spades and four no-trump both as quantitative, the former suggesting both minors 4-4. Next week, I’ll answer the question as to how to show one or both minors. But with a four-card major and a longer minor start with Stayman, then either agree the major if appropriate, or bid the minor if not.

How would you evaluate this hand, playing at Board-a-Match teams? My partner held ♠ A-10-4-3,  10-8-2,  9-7-4, ♣ K-9-2 and responded one spade to one club. The next hand overcalled two diamonds, and I jumped to three spades. What would you do now? (My partner passed, but I had a 4-4-1-4 15-count with the kingqueen of spades and the top hearts. Game needed only a mildly favorable lie of the clubs to come home.)

Swing Low, Holland, Mich.

My calculation is that after spades broke you might well have needed either hearts or clubs to behave well to come to 10 tricks – consider the effect of repeated diamond leads to see that. As far as I can see, both players did exactly the right thing; you were well short of a drive to game, your partner took account of the fact that in competition you may have had to shade your jump raise.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, September 2nd, 2017

The difference between false memories and true ones is the same as for jewels: it is always the false ones that look the most real, the most brilliant.

Salvador Dali


N North
N-S ♠ A Q 5
 8 5
 K Q 8 3
♣ Q 8 6 4
West East
♠ 10 8 3 2
 9 4 2
 A 9 7 4
♣ J 9
♠ J 9 4
 K Q J 6 3
 10 6 5
♣ K 2
South
♠ K 7 6
 A 10 7
 J 2
♣ A 10 7 5 3
South West North East
    1 ♣ 1
3 NT All pass    

2

When Bobby Goldman died suddenly, 20 years ago, he and Paul Soloway had been one of the dominant partnerships in the US for many years. Today’s deal exemplifies his talents.

At the Macallan Invitation Pairs tournament in the United Kingdom you would expect the top 16 pairs in the world to generate the occasional spectacular play, but in its own way I think the following example is outstanding. The play is typical of the brilliancies that the analysts might suggest in the post mortem, but on this occasion Goldman found the play at the table.

When Christian Mari of France reached three no-trump as South, he ducked the opening heart lead and continuation, and won the third round. Since he assumed that East was favorite to hold the diamond ace, he decided he needed to try to play the club suit for five tricks. This would require finding West with the singleton jack. So he went over to dummy with a spade and led the club queen, covered by the club king and ace, under which Bobby Goldman obediently contributed the club jack!

You can hardly blame Mari for crossing to dummy with a second spade to repeat the club finesse, can you? When Goldman produced the nine and played a third round of spades, he had succeeded in setting up the 13th spade as the defense’s fifth winner, before declarer had established the diamond suit for his own ninth trick.

The false-card had gained the critical tempo to set the game.


Your partner’s double is responsive – it applies after the raise of opener’s suit but not after a new suit bid by your LHO. It is for take-out, but the double of a heart call tends to deny spades, since your partner would bid them if he had them. You should simply bid your cheaper, not stronger, minor. So bid three clubs.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 5
 8 5
 K Q 8 3
♣ Q 8 6 4
South West North East
      1
Dbl. 2 Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, September 1st, 2017

But since we are all likely to go astray, The reasonable thing is to learn from those who can teach.

Sophocles


W North
N-S ♠ A J 8 5 3
 A Q 6
 K Q
♣ A 6 2
West East
♠ K Q
 9
 10 7 4 2
♣ K J 10 5 4 3
♠ 9 7 6 2
 K 10 8 7 5
 J 6
♣ 9 8
South
♠ 10 4
 J 4 3 2
 A 9 8 5 3
♣ Q 7
South West North East
  3 ♣ Dbl. 4 ♣
4 All pass    

♣J

At the world championships 20 years ago Nafiz Zorlu of Turkey put in a claim for the best played hand of the event, using an incisive BOLS tip to help him on his way. The tip was that a man who preempts and leads his suit rates to be short, if anywhere, in trumps.

Playing against the Turks’ traditional rivals, Greece, Zorlu reached four hearts after passing up the chance for a considerable penalty, since the auction had started with West opening three clubs in third seat, and East had incautiously raised his partner’s preempt over the take-out double. However though East appeared to have manipulated his opponents into exactly his favorite spot, the move backfired when West trustingly led a club to the first trick. Zorlu won it cheaply in hand and played a diamond to dummy, then led a low heart to the jack. He had inferred that West’s decision to lead his tenuous club suit suggested he had a singleton trump. Now declarer led a second round of diamonds and ducked a spade to West, who exited with a club (a diamond would have been no better).

Zorlu decided to take East’s diamond jack in good faith, so played him for his precise actual shape. He cashed the spade ace, then without playing any more trumps tried the spade jack and a spade ruff. That was his eighth trick, and when he exited with the diamond ace, East could ruff. However, he then had to lead a trump into dummy’s tenace and concede the contract.


However good your diamond fit might be, you should simply raise to three no-trump without looking for the minor suit game. With no singletons, you would be aiming at too small a target to assume that any game but no-trump would be right. If partner had really short hearts (when diamonds might play better) he would surely not have chosen to jump in no-trump but would have bid a second suit.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 4
 J 4 3 2
 A 9 8 5 3
♣ Q 7
South West North East
  Pass 1 Pass
1 Dbl. 2 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Pride is a tricky, glorious, double-edged feeling.

Adrienne Rich


E North
E-W ♠ A K J 3
 K 9
 8 7 5 3
♣ 9 6 4
West East
♠ 10 4
 Q 7 6 2
 Q J 9 2
♣ K J 5
♠ Q 9 8 7 6 2
 3
 10
♣ A Q 10 7 2
South
♠ 5
 A J 10 8 5 4
 A K 6 4
♣ 8 3
South West North East
      2 ♠
3 Pass 4 All pass
       

♠10

Two-suited openers and overcalls can jam the works, but they are a double-edged sword. If you become declarer they can help you to find the way home by drawing a road-map of the opponents’ hands.

East’s two-spade opening showed at least five spades plus a five card minor, and less than opening-bid strength. When South overcalled three hearts, North raised to game and East decided that at the vulnerability he could do no more.

Not knowing which minor his partner held, West led the spade 10 against four hearts. South took the ace and king, pitching one of the losing clubs from hand and now looked well placed, but the possibility of bad breaks in the red suits was a live one.

In an attempt to score his small trumps, South led a club from dummy at trick three. East rose with the ace and accurately switched to his singleton diamond. South played the ace, and followed with a successful finesse of the heart nine to maximize his entries to dummy. He ruffed a club in hand, re-entered dummy with the heart king as East pitched a spade, and ruffed North’s last club in hand, stripping West of all his black-suit cards in the process.

Declarer now cashed the diamond king, and when East failed to follow suit, South exited with a diamond. Although West could collect two diamond tricks, he was then forced to lead away from his heart queen into the trump tenace, and concede the rest.


Not every minimum 6-4 hand is governed by the same principles, but I do have strong opinions about this specific hand. Where you can bid both your suits, and your four-card suit is strong (at least two top honors, or one top honor and good intermediates) bid your second suit and show nine of your cards, not six.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 5
 A J 10 8 5 4
 A K 6 4
♣ 8 3
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

Curses are like young chickens, they always come home to roost.

Robert Southey


W North
None ♠ A K J 8
 A
 K Q 7 6 4 2
♣ 8 3
West East
♠ 10 6 2
 Q 10 7 5 2
 A 10 3
♣ A 7
♠ 9 4
 K J 8 4
 J 5
♣ K Q J 9 4
South
♠ Q 7 5 3
 9 6 3
 9 8
♣ 10 6 5 2
South West North East
  1 2 4
Pass Pass Dbl. Pass
4 ♠ All pass    

♣A

In Shanghai at the Bermuda Bowl of 2007 I was very disappointed in the final position of the Irish team. They had come into the Round Robin as Silver Medalists in the European Championships, and were therefore among the favorites to advance to the Knock-Out phase. This did not happen, but they were nonetheless fighting right to the end – as witness this deal from their very final match.

John Carroll and Tommy Garvey play a light opening bid system whereby they frequently open 10-counts, as here. Carroll, West guessed well to lead the ace and another club. Garvey continued with a third round of clubs as Carroll pitched a heart.

Declarer ruffed and cashed two rounds of trumps then played the diamond king, which Carroll ducked, following with the 10. The contract can, of course, still be made easily by leading the diamond queen or playing a spade to the South hand and a diamond towards the queen. However, the sight of the diamond 10 was enough to convince South that his play didn’t matter – that is to say that West’s card had to be from the ace-10 or ace-jack-10. He continued with a small diamond, letting East win his diamond jack.

Now Garvey made no mistake, continuing with his remaining top club, on which West threw the diamond ace! Declarer had to ruff in the North hand, and at this point could not get off dummy to draw the last trump without promoting West’s spade 10 for the setting trick.


No one could blame you for passing with a twocount here. But in context you have enough (or almost enough) to compete to three clubs now. The doubleton diamond, four trumps and a queen that is likely to contribute something to the cause may not be much – but your partner has already shown a full reverse by competing facing a passing partner.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 7 5 3
 9 6 3
 9 8
♣ 10 6 5 2
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♣ Dbl.
Pass 1 2 2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

In the rotation of crops there was a recognized season for wild oats; but they were not sown more than once.

Edith Wharton


S North
E-W ♠ K 5 2
 A Q 9
 Q 7 3
♣ K Q 8 2
West East
♠ Q J 10 3
 6 3
 10 9 6 4
♣ J 6 5
♠ A 9 8 7
 7 5 4
 J 8
♣ A 10 9 3
South
♠ 6 4
 K J 10 8 2
 A K 5 2
♣ 7 4
South West North East
1 Pass 2 ♣ Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
4 All pass    

♠Q

With his values concentrated in his long suits, and fine heart intermediates, South has a far more promising opening bid than most balanced 12-counts.

North can force to game with a two-over-one response, then raise hearts and try for slam. South will put the brakes on firmly, and unless North suffers a severe rush of blood to the head, South will finish in four hearts. Against this contract, West has a straightforward lead of a top spade. South ducks the first two spades in dummy, but when a third spade is played (a trump shift was essential) he must ruff. Declarer can now see that if the club ace is offside, and diamonds do not break, he may need to plan what he will do with his fourth diamond.

When declarer plays a club to the king, East wins (though ducking might make declarer’s task a little harder). East returns a club, and dummy wins. It is far more likely that trumps are breaking 3-2 than that diamonds are 3-3, or that the same hand has long diamonds and long clubs, so South changes tack. He ruffs a club in hand, crosses to dummy with a diamond, and ruffs another club. By this time, South has ruffed three times in his hand. This leaves him with only two trumps in hand compared to dummy’s three.

South can draw trump in three rounds, discarding his last diamond on dummy’s long trump, and come to 10 tricks in the form of one club, three ruffs, three trumps, and three diamonds: a perfect dummy reversal.


If you do not play any conventions in this sequence, redoubling then raising hearts is the best way to show these values. However, one of Marty Bergen’s most useful ideas was to play that one or both of the minor-suit responses after the double of a major should be subverted for a constructive major-suit raise. For more details see https://www.larryco.com/ bridge-learning-center/detail/704.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 9 8 7
 7 5 4
 J 8
♣ A 10 9 3
South West North East
  Pass 1 Dbl.
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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