Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, April 11th, 2015

There are two sides to every question.

Diogenes


South North
Both ♠ A Q 9 8
 K 9 8 3
 A Q 4
♣ 10 3
West East
♠ 10 6
 J 7 6 5 4
 7 6
♣ J 7 4 2
♠ J 5 2
 Q 2
 K 10 5 2
♣ Q 9 6 5
South
♠ K 7 4 3
 A 10
 J 9 8 3
♣ A K 8
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2♣ Pass
2♠ Pass 4♣ Pass
4 Pass 6♠ All pass

♣4

This is the last board this week from a past Yeh Bros Cup event. Reaching slam is not so hard; making it is another matter, but here are the lines chosen by a couple of successful declarers.

Bauke Muller of the Netherlands played six spades on the lead of the club four (third from an even number, low from an odd number). He won and drew trump, ending in hand, then took a diamond finesse. When the defenders continued the attack on clubs, West let go the club two – confirming an original four-card suit. Now declarer played three rounds of hearts, ruffing the third, then ruffed a club. In the three-card ending he knew East had begun with precisely three spades, two hearts and four clubs so it was marked to finesse against the diamond 10. Had West tried to conceal the club distribution, the count might have been far harder to confirm.

Paul Hackett of England also played slam here, from the North seat, on a trump lead. He won in hand and went to the club ace to take a losing diamond finesse. Back came a trump (yes, a club makes declarer’s task harder) so Hackett won and played three rounds of hearts ruffing in dummy. Then he played the last trump and took the diamond jack, and led a diamond to the ace. Now the last trump executed a double squeeze: with East guarding diamonds and West guarding hearts, neither player could keep the clubs; so trick 13 was scored by the club eight.


You showed a poor hand at your first turn and a really bad one at your second turn. But your partner is still interested in game, so he must have at least a 20-count or the equivalent. I’d raise him to game, albeit without a great deal of confidence, assuming I really trusted him. I certainly wouldn’t redouble!

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 6
 J 7 6 5 4
 7 6
♣ J 7 4 2
South West North East
Pass 1 Dbl. Pass
1 Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, April 10th, 2015

Men were not intended to work with the accuracy of tools, to be precise and perfect in all their actions.

John Ruskin


West North
North-South ♠ J 6 2
 Q 6
 K J 7 4
♣ A K 9 8
West East
♠ Q 10 8 7
 K 2
 A 3 2
♣ Q 10 7 4
♠ K 9 5 4 3
 J 9 8 3
 10 9
♣ 3 2
South
♠ A
 A 10 7 5 4
 Q 8 6 5
♣ J 6 5
South West North East
  1♣ Pass 1*
Dbl. 2♠ Dbl. 3♠
Pass Pass 4 NT Pass
5 All pass    

*Spades

♠7

At the Yeh Bros Cup the match between the Sweden and Italy teams produced a splendid example of card-reading plus playing for the best chance to make an unlikely game. Antonio Sementa was the declarer here in an extremely delicate minor-suit game.

Presumably Sementa’s double of the spade-showing one heart showed hearts and a minor. It seems best to play the double and cuebid here as each showing a specific minor along with the unbid major, in this case hearts. Giorgio Duboin drove to game when confident he was facing short spades, and Sementa had to play five diamonds on a spade lead.

He took an uncharacteristically long time to play to trick two, but came to the right conclusion that East’s decision to compete to three spades marked him with extra shape. Since Sementa needed trumps to split, it was right for declarer to play him to hold heart length, because if he had club length Sementa would be left with three fairly sure losers. By contrast, if East had short clubs, the club and heart finesses might both work.

Eventually, declarer led a trump to dummy to run the heart queen. Nystrom won and also took his time before playing ace and another diamond. Declarer won in hand, passed the club jack, covered all round, finessed in hearts, set up the hearts, ruffed a spade back to hand, and finally took the second club finesse for 11 tricks. This was a fine example of placing the cards where they needed to be, to find a route to success.


It would be simple just to bid five hearts here. But this hand has quite significant slam potential, so it might be more discreet not to commit your hand to a single contract. Try a bid of four no-trump, suggesting two places to play, planning to convert a response of five clubs to five hearts, making a slam-try for hearts.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A
 A 10 7 5 4
 Q 8 6 5
♣ J 6 5
South West North East
  3♠ Dbl. 4♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Scenery is fine – but human nature is finer.

John Keats


North North
East-West ♠ K Q 8
 4
 A 10 7 2
♣ A K Q 7 5
West East
♠ A J 9 4 3
 9 7
 Q 8 5 3
♣ J 3
♠ 10 7 6 5
 K Q 5 3
 K 9
♣ 10 9 4
South
♠ 2
 A J 10 8 6 2
 J 6 4
♣ 8 6 2
South West North East
    1♣ Pass
1* Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 2 NT Pass
4 All pass    

*Hearts

5

In this deal from the Yeh Bros Cup, on which North-South declared four hearts, the normal but unsuccessful line was to lead a heart to the jack then play heart ace and another heart, which failed today.

Agustin Madala played four hearts and received a diamond lead to the king, a spade shift to the ace, and a second diamond. He rose with the ace, pitched his diamond on the top spade, finessed the heart jack, then played a club to dummy. Next came a diamond ruff on which East discarded a club, a second top club, and the master spade to pitch his last club. Now came a second diamond ruff as East pitched his last spade.

Declarer could then safely exit with the heart jack, to endplay East in trumps, knowing that if East won and had a spade to lead he would be able to ruff low and not be over-ruffed.

East should have pitched a spade on the third diamond, retaining his losing club. Declarer would have led the fourth diamond from dummy on which a club discard or low ruff by East would be hopeless. But East might have given declarer a losing option by ruffing high.

Declarer has to overruff and then has to read whether to exit with a high or low trump, depending on whether East’s remaining heart honor is bare, or if the nine is falling. I think declarer should play West for the bare nine, assuming that West has not false-carded earlier in trumps.


You do not have to do more than raise to three spades now. While you surely will not sell out if your partner bids just four spades, you should let your partner take control. He can ask you for aces or controls as he sees fit, and he will be better placed than you to know how far to go.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 7 6 5
 K Q 5 3
 K 9
♣ 10 9 4
South West North East
Pass Pass 2♣ Pass
2 Pass 2♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

For everything you have missed, you have gained something, and for everything you gain, you lose something.

Ralph Waldo Emerson


East North
Neither ♠ J 10 6 3
 A Q 9 7
 A 8 3
♣ K 4
West East
♠ K 7 4 2
 J 10 4 3 2
 10 7
♣ J 2
♠ Q
 K
 K Q 9 6 4
♣ 10 9 7 6 5 3
South
♠ A 9 8 5
 8 6 5
 J 5 2
♣ A Q 8
South West North East
      Pass
1* Pass 1 Pass
1♠ Pass 4♠ All pass

*Precision

10

Today’s deal from the Yeh Bros qualifying saw the meeting of two squads who were on the verge of qualifying, and a missed opportunity for one of them.

In one room Jack Zhao showed the minors as East and bought an exceptionally poor dummy in three clubs doubled. The defenders took pity on him and never played trumps at all, allowing a diamond ruff in dummy. Still, minus 300 was not a great position for East-West with four spades so awkward.

Zejun Zhuang received the lead of the diamond 10 and ducked it to East’s queen. Back came a club and he won in dummy, led a low trump to the queen and ace, and guessed well when he next led a heart to the nine and king. A second club came back, so he won in hand and played a third club, planning to pitch a diamond and cross-ruff.

Alas for declarer, when West could ruff in, declarer was left with an inevitable trump and diamond loser. At trick six, had declarer taken a second heart finesse, by running the eight, covered by West, he would have been much better placed. He next leads out the spade jack then 10, which West must duck or declarer can draw trump and cash the club winner then take a third heart finesse. When both trumps are ducked, declarer changes tack and plays the diamond ace, ruffs a heart to hand and leads the club queen to pitch dummy’s diamond, leaving West with just the master trump.


Your hand is worth an invitation to game, and the obvious suit in which you should play is diamonds (notwithstanding the fact that your clubs are better than your diamonds, your partner rates to have longer diamonds than clubs). So bid three diamonds, and let your partner decide where, if anywhere, to go from here.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 9 8 5
 8 6 5
 J 5 2
♣ A Q 8
South West North East
  Pass 1 Pass
1♠ Pass 2♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

A thing long expected takes the form of the unexpected when at last it comes.

Mark Twain


South North
North-South ♠ J 5 2
 9 5 4
 A 9 7 4
♣ 8 7 4
West East
♠ A Q 10 8 7
 A K J 2
 5
♣ A 5 3
♠ 9 6 4
 8 7 6
 K J 10 2
♣ 9 6 2
South
♠ K 3
 Q 10 3
 Q 8 6 3
♣ K Q J 10
South West North East
1 Dbl. Pass Pass
1 Dbl. Pass Pass
2♣ Dbl. All pass  

K

In the Yeh Bros Cup, this was the last board of a very close semi-final between the two undefeated teams.

Consider what you would expect to happen at a normal table. South will open one club, West will double, and East will happily respond one diamond. West now bids one spade, and there the matter rests; it will all be about overtricks. No need for drama.

Ah, but what if South opens a Precision one diamond ? Now after West’s double what do you do as East? You probably bid one heart now in fear and trembling; try and stop low now with the East-West cards. That was what happened to Joe Grue; he did bid one heart, and ended up in three hearts. Since he could never reach his hand to take a heart finesse the defenders scored their four plain tricks and could lead the 13th club to promote the heart nine.

In our featured room Meckstroth also opened one diamond and Bjorn Fallenius as West also doubled. Eric Rodwell passed as North, and Peter Fredin produced the sort of call that makes him such good reporting material. He passed one diamond doubled, gambling that Meckstroth would never sit for it even with moderate diamond length.

It worked like a charm. Meckstroth escaped from his best contract, and eventually declared two clubs, doubled and down 800. Even on best declarer play in one diamond Meckstroth would surely have gone down 200 – so Fredin’s pass was right in both theory and practice.


Your hand is obviously worth a drive to game, but is it possible that your side can make slam? Yes it is, though you will need some fairly specific cards opposite, which partner never seems to have. Maybe if you bid three hearts and get raised to four hearts (or hear a four club cuebid from your partner) you might consider going past game.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 10 8 7
 A K J 2
 5
♣ A 5 3
South West North East
1♠ Pass 2♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, April 6th, 2015

But what’s the odds, so long as you’re happy?

George du Maurier


South North
Both ♠ A J 3
 Q 7
 Q 9 2
♣ A K 8 7 6
West East
♠ K 9 7 6
 6 3 2
 K J 7 4
♣ 10 4
♠ Q 10 8 5 4 2
 9 8 5 4
 —
♣ J 9 5
South
♠ —
 A K J 10
 A 10 8 6 5 3
♣ Q 3 2
South West North East
1 Pass 2♣ Pass
2 Pass 2 NT Pass
3♣ Pass 3 Pass
4 Pass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 6 All pass

♠6

Since the Yeh Bros Invitation teams is about to start in Shanghai, this week’s deals all come from past Yeh Bros Cup events. This deal is simply an exercise in percentages. How should you play the diamond suit for one loser in that contract?

Both tables in the match I was watching bid to the diamond slam here, in one case after a strong club and contested auction, in the other on an uncontested sequence. What are the three sensible options here? The first, selected by both Souths, is to run the diamond queen, planning a second finesse if appropriate. This loses when West has both honors – and therefore pays off to an original East holding of: void, either of the two small singletons and the small doubleton. The second line is to cash the ace; this loses when East began with a void or all four cards, or K-J third.

Better than either of these two lines is to run the eight from your hand, planning to finesse against East for the king, should the eight lose to the jack. This line of play loses when East has jack-singleton, or to jack-doubleton (assuming that West ducks stoically from his doubleton king — don’t we all?) and you misguess, but does not lose out to either void. Accordingly this is the best line, and it works today.

If you have a 5-4 as opposed to the 6-3 fit, playing the ace no longer loses to a void in East, but psychologically running the eight is still the best play.


Since partner is marked with scattered values, I can see a good case for leading the diamond king. I agree it could cost a trick, but it might turn your heart queen into a winner via a ruff or overruff. My second choice would be a club as the most passive option, rather than a spade, I think.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ K 9 4 2
 Q 5
 K 3
♣ J 8 6 4 3
South West North East
      2
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, April 5th, 2015

We play two over one, and recently I was criticized for my handling of this collection. I held: ♠ 10-7-2,  Q-8-3,  A-K-J-7-3-2, ♣ Q, and responded with a forcing one no-trump to one spade, then jumped to three spades over my partner’s two club call. I was told later that I should force to game with 12 points – but the comical denouement to this deal is that with trumps 4-1 the limit of the hand was eight tricks. Down one was a shared top!

Yellow-Bellied Sap-Sucker, Dayton, Ohio

I think you used good judgment not to force to game, since the bad trump and singleton honor make this worth less than the high cards suggest. At teams I might drive the hand to game notwithstanding that, but at pairs use your judgment, and assume your partner will understand, even if he doesn’t agree.

With what range hands should one make a splinter-raise of one’s partner? This question applies both to responder to an opening bid, and by opener to his partner’s response.

Love Lorn, Spartanburg, S.C.

In the absence of complex agreements a splinter in response to an opening shows the equivalent of an opening bid. One should not do it with a really strong hand but should start with a Jacoby Two no-trump or the equivalent. As opener, splinter in response to a one-level response with 17+, shortness, and four-card trump support. In rebidding after a one-level opening and two-level response, assuming you are already in a game force, you do not need real extras to make a splinter-bid.

Can you tell me what are the rules relating to played cards by the defenders or declarer (or dummy for that matter)? The two common issues that seem to create problems are dropped cards, or cards called by declarer then retracted.

Legal Seagull, Richmond, Va.

Taking your second question first: a card called for declarer but retracted in the same breath can be changed. The director should make that a high hurdle to cross, though. A dropped card – one that was clearly not intended to be played — should be retracted without penalty, though a defender may create unauthorized information for his partner in the process. Finally: to simplify what the laws says, a card held by a defender such that it can be seen by his partner should be deemed played, whereas a card is played by declarer when it touches the table.

Do you like the use of coded nines and tens in suit or no-trump play by the defense? By this I mean that both on opening lead and in mid-play, tens and nines show zero or two high honors.

Rosetta Stone, Levittown, Pa.

On opening lead my experience has been that declarer gains more from these methods than third hand. Conversely, in mid-play a defender should be able to work out when not to give away unnecessary information to declarer, so that their use makes reasonable sense.

How can I differentiate between the times to overcall in a moderate five-card suit and when to double or pass? The hand that triggered this issue was that I held: ♠ K-10-3,  K-9-6-5,  K-10-9-8-5, ♣ 3, and was not sure what to do over an opening call of one club on my right.

Wonder Woman, Durham, N.C.

Your hand poses an awkward problem. With minimum values and a five-card suit, I am happy to overcall, especially in a major. But with five diamonds and 4-3 in the other suits I would lean towards doubling if I had another queen. Action here is surely right; get in while you can – the quick and dirty approach is safest and most effective.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, April 4th, 2015

Pray for the repose of his soul. He was so tired.

Baron Corvo


North North
North-South ♠ 7 5 4
 9
 A Q J 6 2
♣ K Q 10 9
West East
♠ Q J 3 2
 Q 7
 K 9 7 3
♣ 7 6 5
♠ K 9 8 6
 A 5 4
 8 5
♣ A 8 3 2
South
♠ A 10
 K J 10 8 6 3 2
 10 4
♣ J 4
South West North East
    1 Dbl.
4 All pass    

♠Q

For many years the three major US tournaments, the Vanderbilt, Spingold, and Reisinger were used as qualifying events for the US trials, so the fields effectively consisted only of American players. When the trials opened up to everyone, about 20 years ago, foreign players started to come in greater numbers to the US national tournaments.

As the events got stronger (they are basically the equivalent of world championships now) foreign winners started to emerge. But it took until 2008 for a Polish team to win the Vanderbilt, and their performance was even more impressive when you consider that they played throughout as a team of four.

But, of course, when you play every board, you will not get everything right. Krzysztof Martens showed me this deal to indicate how tiredness can get the better of everybody. Four hearts is not a great spot — especially on a spade lead. Martens took his spade ace and played on diamonds by taking the finesse. East ruffed the third round, so Martens overruffed and played a club to the king, which held the trick. Then a heart towards the king left the defenders no chance.

The defenders could and should have prevailed by winning the club ace and under-leading in spades to allow the lead of the fourth diamond, ruffed with the heart ace. That promotes the heart queen to the setting trick. And declarer could and should have countered that by discarding his spade on the third diamond.


When passed for penalties on an auction of this sort, you should run, rather than sit it out. One possibility is to bid one spade, but you have no real certainty this will be much better. One alternative is to redouble, planning to sit for one heart if partner bids it, or to redouble one diamond if that is where he escapes to.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 9 8 6
 A 5 4
 8 5
♣ A 8 3 2
South West North East
    Pass Pass
1♣ Dbl. Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, April 3rd, 2015

In life we have to size up the chances and calculate the possible risks and our ability to deal with them and then make our plans accordingly.

Freya North


West North
Both ♠ 9 8
 J 6 3
 10 7 5 4 2
♣ K 8 4
West East
♠ 10 6 5 4
 9
 A
♣ A Q J 9 5 3 2
♠ 7 2
 K Q 8 7 5 2
 Q 9 8
♣ 10 6
South
♠ A K Q J 3
 A 10 4
 K J 6 3
♣ 7
South West North East
  1♣ Pass 1
Dbl. 3♣ Pass Pass
3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass

A

While the world junior championships were being played in Bali in 1995, a tournament to celebrate Indonesia’s 50th anniversary was being run simultaneously. Today’s problem meant the difference between qualifying for the finals or going home, so it turned out to be an expensive slip for South.

South handled his very powerful hand sensibly enough in the auction, but North might have passed three spades, reasoning that the club king was not likely to be pulling its full weight. Indeed, the final contract looks next to impossible, even after the lead of the diamond ace.

However, at trick two, after a lot of thought, West switched to the club ace, then played the heart nine, to East’s queen and declarer’s ace. What next? The line chosen at the table by declarer was to draw four rounds of trump and try the heart 10, but East ducked that and declarer had no chance now. He had to lose one further trick in each red suit.

Can you spot the winning line? It is not so bizarre; West’s auction and opening lead suggest he has seven clubs and the bare diamond ace. You need to win the first heart and play West to be 4-1-1-7. You can test the theory by playing three top trump, and then throwing West in by leading your low trump, to force him to play a club for you. Now you have an entry to dummy to take the diamond finesse, and eventually a second parking place for your losing hearts.


Unless you have specifically agreed to the contrary, a new suit here is natural and forcing, so you cannot pass. One option is to rebid three hearts (which I would do with better heart intermediates) but as it is, I think it is better to temporize with a call of three diamonds. That might be what partner needs to hear to bid no-trump, or it might allow him to suggest heart tolerance.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 7 2
 K Q 8 7 5 2
 Q 9 8
♣ 10 6
South West North East
2 Pass 3♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

The subject of oratory alone is not truth, but persuasion.

Lord Macaulay


South North
Both ♠ 8 4 3
 6 2
 K J 7 6 5 4
♣ 8 6
West East
♠ 9 6 5 2
 J 10 9 7 3
 —
♣ A 7 5 3
♠ Q J 10 7
 8 5 4
 A 10 9 2
♣ K 2
South
♠ A K
 A K Q
 Q 8 3
♣ Q J 10 9 4
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

J

When this deal came up at a club duplicate the field was divided between those recording nine tricks in three no-trump, and those who fared somewhat less well.

The auction almost always took this form, and West was blessed with an easy lead of the heart jack. The unsuccessful declarers led a diamond to one of dummy’s honors. East won the trick and returned a heart, and got in with the club king to play a third heart. Now West had a sure entry in the form of the club ace, plus two hearts to cash.

By contrast, the successful declarers won the opening lead and played the diamond queen from their hand. Some Easts took the trick to return a heart, but declarer could win, then duck a diamond, and come to five tricks in the majors and four diamonds.

The more cautious defenders ducked the diamond queen. Now declarer could change tack, realizing the futility of trying to set up more than one further trick in diamonds. He played on clubs, and East won the first club and played back a heart. But declarer, with one diamond trick in the bag, simply drove out the club ace, and had his five major-suit tricks, three clubs, and one diamond winner, for nine tricks.

You could argue that the defenders who led a low diamond from hand at trick two were unlucky, since against anything but the 4-0 diamond break their play would not cost. I say fortune favors the prepared mind.


I’m not going to tell you that you will never miss game if you pass two hearts. Very occasionally your side will be able to make game. But once you have a strong no-trump to your right, game can hardly be laydown, and additionally you don’t want to stop partner from balancing in these auctions. Pass, and apologize later if you are wrong.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q J 10 7
 8 5 4
 A 10 9 2
♣ K 2
South West North East
      1 NT
Pass Pass 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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