Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

There is not a fool can call me friend.

W. B. Yeats


South North
Neither ♠ K 10 9 8 7 5
 K Q 7 3
 8
♣ J 2
West East
♠ 6 4
 J 8 6 2
 K 10 6 3
♣ Q 9 6
♠ A J 2
 A 4
 7 5 2
♣ A 8 5 4 3
South
♠ Q 3
 10 9 5
 A Q J 9 4
♣ K 10 7
South West North East
1 NT Pass 4* Pass
4♠ All pass    

*Texas Transfer to spades

♠6

Bob Scott and my old friend John Wignall were the early leaders of the pairs tournament at the Gold Coast last year in Brisbane Australia, form where all this week's deals come. The first board out of the box certainly didn't hurt.

When East led a trump against Scott’s ambitious game, (one could hardly argue with the choice of any card in his hand) that was one hurdle over. Scott’s spade seven held, and he played a second trump. East won and should surely have exited with a low club, but he cashed his club ace, receiving encouragement, then erred again by taking his heart ace before playing a second club. Scott rose with the king and led the heart 10 from hand, ducked smoothly by West. Scott overtook and ran the trumps, to reduce to a four-card ending with a trump, two hearts, and a diamond in dummy, and the ace-queen of diamonds, a heart and the club 10 in hand.

Best now would have been to cash the last trump and pitch the heart from hand. West gets caught in a triple squeeze where he must pitch the diamond king or club queen, or unguard the hearts.

Scott erred when he pitched his club 10 instead on the last trump, and now West could pitch the club queen, which he did after much squirming. Scott then cashed the heart queen, and decided the tempo indicated he should play East for the diamond king. So he led a diamond to his ace for his 10th trick.


You might feel the need to act (by bidding no-trump or raising partner) but surely now is not the moment to do so. One can raise diamonds with three — but not with such feeble trumps. And you could bid no-trump with a real source of tricks and one heart stopper such as the doubleton king — but not with these clubs and a heart holding where you might want to protect an honor in partner's hand. Pass seems right, when you have nothing to say.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A J 2
 A 4
 7 5 2
♣ A 8 5 4 3
South West North East
Pass
1♣ Pass 1 1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, January 12th, 2015

What we have here is failure to communicate.

Donn Pearce and Frank Pierson (Cool Hand Luke)


South North
East-West ♠ 9 6 2
 10 8 7 2
 A K 9 2
♣ Q J
West East
♠ A 8 4
 K J
 7 5 3
♣ 10 9 8 5 4
♠ J 10 5
 A Q 9 3
 10 8 6 4
♣ 7 6
South
♠ K Q 7 3
 6 5 4
 Q J
♣ A K 3 2
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♣10

A recent deal from the Gold Coast Congress in Australia presented some interest to me. With South declarer in three no-trump on a top club lead from West, how challenging a deal do you think this is?

I was surprised to see that no fewer than a quarter of the field went down in three no-trumps after a club or diamond lead. If that doesn’t tickle your curiosity, it should, since this is almost a sure trick problem (you can’t guarantee the contract since the opponents might have four hearts and a spade to cash, and 5-2 diamonds might embarrass you).

After a club lead by West, the hand with the entry problems is clearly North rather than South — the spade honors should always allow you to reach the South hand late in the day. So win the club lead, unblock diamonds, then cross to the club honor in dummy, and cash your two remaining diamond tricks. When you lead a spade toward South, the defenders can win but they cannot cash their four heart tricks because of the blockage.

Just for the record, if North is declarer on an initial spade lead by East, life is far harder. South covers the jack, and West does best to duck. Now the only way to make the game is for declarer to play on hearts at every turn to cut the defenders’ communications in hearts. That way, the defenders will eventually have to allow declarer into one hand or the other.


Lead the club nine, playing your partner (who needs to have decent values to have any chance to beat the game) to have clubs rather than spades. If he had a decent hand with spades, he might well have taken the opportunity to act at his first or second turn to speak.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ A 4 2
 10 7 5 2
 10 9 3
♣ 9 8 2
South West North East
Pass 1
Pass 1 Pass 1 NT
Pass 3 NT All pass  

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, January 11th, 2015

When one plays Drury is there not the risk of losing the club suit as a passed hand? If so, how does one combat that?

Passed Over, Sioux Falls, S.D.

Drury (in which the passed hand response of two clubs to a major-suit opening, showing a maximum pass, and a fit) keeps you low on occasions, and lets you explore for the right game efficiently. You minimize the risk you describe if you stretch to open one club with 11 points and six clubs in first or second chair. With fewer points, pass, then respond one no-trump (or three clubs to show real clubs and no major-suit fit, if necessary).

I know this sounds like a very basic question, but to preempt do I open two or three? I realize that to preempt in clubs I would have to say three, but for the other suits is a preempt bid at the two- or three-level?

Learning Fast, San Antonio, Texas

Please do not apologize for asking questions. The game is hard enough, and if you cannot learn by asking, it is even harder. Both calls are preempts, showing less than opening values; two-level bids show six, three-level bids show seven-card suits.

I never know what to do when partner opens and I have a four-card major with a five-card minor, and 10 points or more. Holding ♠ K-10-4-3,  J-5,  K-6, ♣ A-10-6-4-3, what should I bid in response to an opening bid of one diamond or one heart?

Humble Pie, Madison, Wis.

With four spades and a five-card minor, one tends to bid the major if the hand is not worth a force to game. On stronger hands, as here, bid two clubs then two spades, and plan to force to game. However, if you would be happy to play a 4-3 spade fit (on the example hand shift the club ace into the spades) so that you had a chunky four-card suit, and a weak five-carder in clubs, then you can sensibly respond one spade.

I always read your column daily, but occasionally, like today, I am at a loss to understand the bidding. How in the world can authors keep any credibility by writing a book for beginners and say it is acceptable to jump raise your partner in a major with only nine high cards points? Your question was "After reviewing dummy, what should your plan be?" the plan is obvious. Get a new partner!

Fifth Beatle, Seneca, S.C.

Not all nine-counts are created equal, and while with scattered values and four trumps I'd raise a major to two, the hand in question in the article had soft working trump honors, and a useful four-card side-suit. It was ♠ Q-J-4-2  A-Q-6-3  10-4-2 ♣ 4-3 and was surely not a million miles from a limit raise. And would holding an additional value such as the club jack really make a real difference to you?

Did you watch the junior bridge tournament in Istanbul this summer, live or online? And if so what was your impression of the standard of bridge played?

Keen Spectator, Phoenix, Ariz.

I did watch some of the bridge online at Bridge Base, and I was especially impressed by the under-21 players from Sweden and the USA who played with maturity well beyond their years. I expect to see many of them in Open World Championships, sooner rather than later.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, January 10th, 2015

Man is the only kind of varmint that sets his own trap, baits it, and falls into it.

John Steinbeck


South North
East-West ♠ 8 4 3
 K J 7 6 4 3
 K 2
♣ A 4
West East
♠ K Q 6 2
 —
 Q J 8 5
♣ Q J 10 7 3
♠ 9 7 5
 9
 A 10 7 6 4
♣ 9 6 5 2
South
♠ A J 10
 A Q 10 8 5 2
 9 3
♣ K 8
South West North East
1 Dbl. 4 All pass

♣Q

Gunnar Hallberg is not only one of the best players around, he is also a fine analyst, with a good eye for a deal. He sent me this apparently simple board from an online teams game, telling me that both his partner and his opponents could have done better. But now you are warned, you won't fall into the traps, will you?

At the table the contract of four hearts received a top club lead. Declarer won the ace and drew trumps, then stripped off the clubs, and led a diamond to the king and ace. Back came a spade to the jack and queen and West cashed his diamond winner then played a second spade; 10 tricks made.

The defensive error is easy to spot; had West underled his diamond queen, East would have won his 10 and played a second spade, for down one. But declarer’s slight slip is far harder to spot. He could surely have made the defenders’ life more difficult if he had given up on the overtrick after winning the club king at trick one. After taking out the trump and leading a club to the king, a low diamond from dummy would have made East’s life VERY hard. He needs to go in with the 10 to have any chance to set the hand. Be honest, would you have found the play?

I suppose one could argue that the play is unlikely to cost; but I’m not sure I would see the position coming unless I was very wide awake.


Having rebid hearts (which suggests five good ones or a six-card suit) you do not need to re-emphasize that suit. The choice is to rebid two no-trump to show the diamond stopper, or to give preference to clubs on a doubleton. Though this sequence would, traditionally promise three trumps. I prefer to give preference now rather than later. We can always get back to no-trump if partner simply needs a single stopper.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 4 3
 K J 7 6 4 3
 K 2
♣ A 4
South West North East
1 Pass 2♣ Pass
2 Pass 2♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, January 9th, 2015

We never do anything well till we cease to think about the manner of doing it.

William Hazlitt


South North
Both ♠ 9 6 4 2
 Q 7 6
 9 3 2
♣ 8 6 3
West East
♠ 10 7
 9 8 4
 8 6 5
♣ K Q J 9 2
♠ K 8 5 3
 10 5 3 2
 A K 4
♣ 7 5
South
♠ A Q J
 A K J
 Q J 10 7
♣ A 10 4
South West North East
2♣ Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♣K

When this deal occurred at my local club, I was interested in the variety of play and defense that took place. At my table West led the club king, requesting count. East showed a doubleton so I won the second club and led the diamond jack from my hand. East won this, to play a heart, and I took the trick in hand and led the diamond queen. When East shrewdly ducked, I cashed two hearts ending in dummy, took the spade finesse, then threw East in with a diamond. He could cash his long heart but I took the last three tricks with two spade winners and a diamond.

At other tables West was allowed to hold the first two club tricks. A third club now was pointless, so West looked to try to set up a trick for his partner. The heart nine turned out to be the winner, since East was able to get in twice more in diamonds, and establish a fifth winner for his side.

But note that to defeat the hand East still needs to keep declarer out of dummy for the second spade finesse. So he must duck either declarer’s first or second high diamond, or declarer can come to three spade tricks, three heart tricks, two diamonds and a club.

(As an aside, it is very useful against no-trump to have the specific leading agreement that one of the ace or king asks for attitude, the other shows a good suit and requests the unblock of an honor, or a count signal – high for even, low for odd.)


To bid a major here requires either five cards or a four-card suit where you would not be unhappy to be raised with three. Neither of your majors meets that criterion so settle for a simple raise to two diamonds – in my opinion a cuebid raise should either have a fourth trump or should be a little better put together than this hand. It never hurts to have a maximum for your bidding once in a while.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 8 5 3
 10 5 3 2
 A K 4
♣ 7 5
South West North East
1♣ 1 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, January 8th, 2015

A brain of feathers, and a heart of lead.

Alexander Pope


West North
East-West ♠ Q 10
 K J 10 6
 Q J
♣ Q J 7 6 4
West East
♠ A K J 9 2
 9 5
 K 7 4 2
♣ A 5
♠ 8 7 6 4
 3 2
 10 6 3
♣ 10 9 8 2
South
♠ 5 3
 A Q 8 7 4
 A 9 8 5
♣ K 3
South West North East
1♠ Pass Pass
2 Pass 2♠ Pass
3 Pass 4 All pass

♠K

There are plenty of people at the Dyspeptics Club who would consider raising one spade to two as East, to muddy the waters for the opponents, but at unfavorable vulnerability today's East was not amongst them. Accordingly North-South had a relatively free run to four hearts, against which West cashed his two high spades and shifted to a passive trump. That left declarer free to tackle the hearts and clubs as best he could, without any help from the opponents. At the table he saw no need to look further than drawing trumps and advancing the club king. West took the trick and continued with his passive defense, by returning a club.

Now South tested clubs first, then when they failed to behave he took the diamond finesse, and was more hurt than surprised when it lost.

South was about to start lamenting his bad luck when he noticed from his partner’s premature gloat that this would be inappropriate. Untypically, he asked his partner if there was anything he could have done, rather than trying to absolve himself from blame. What was the response?

South should have drawn trumps ending in his hand then led a low club toward the dummy. West cannot gain by taking the trick and having his ace fall on empty air. But when he ducks, he is thrown in at the next trick with the club ace, to give a ruff-sluff or lead diamonds for declarer. Either way, 10 tricks result.


It is normal to reopen with a double when you are short in the opponents' suit, in case partner was lurking with a penalty double. Here, though, your clubs seem too good for that to be possible and your hearts are too weak to welcome a response in that suit. So simply bid two diamonds now – with passing a viable if pessimistic alternative, in case the opponents have missed the boat in hearts.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A K J 9 2
 9 5
 K 7 4 2
♣ A 5
South West North East
1♠ 2♣ Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Nobody is smarter than you are. And what if they are? What good is their understanding doing you?

Terence McKenna


North North
North-South ♠ K 3 2
 7 3
 A 4
♣ A K Q 10 8 4
West East
♠ 10 9 8 5 4
 A J 10
 J 10 8 2
♣ 7
♠ J
 Q 9 8 6 5
 Q 9 5
♣ 9 6 3 2
South
♠ A Q 7 6
 K 4 2
 K 7 6 3
♣ J 5
South West North East
1♣ Pass
1 Pass 3♣ Pass
4♣ Pass 4 Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
6 NT All pass    

♠10

Some of the clever plays found by experts are absurdly simple. Watch Zia Mahmood at work in his contract of six no-trump. West leads the spade 10, you play low from dummy, East contributes the jack and you win the ace. Plan the play before reading on.

The obvious thing to do is lead a heart to your king, but can you see the extra chance spotted by Zia? At trick two he played the spade six from his hand and ran it when West twitched, then played low. That was his 12th trick immediately. Zia was confident that East would not have played the jack unless he had to, and West did not see the need to split his honors, but learned the hard way that it never pays to underestimate your opponents.

Zia might still have succeeded had West split his spade intermediates. Ever the showman, he would have seen that he could make his slam by playing West for the heart ace. If he runs all his winners coming down to a three-card ending (where in his hand he holds the singleton heart king and spade Q-7) West either has to discard down to the singleton spade nine, allowing Zia to run the spades, or else come down to the singleton heart ace, in which case Zia could exit with a heart to endplay West into leading a spade.

We cannot be sure Zia would have played the hand this way, but in my experience it does not pay to bet against him.


Your partner's double here suggests a balanced hand – and indicates the possibility of defending if you have the appropriate hand. Passing would be a reasonable gamble here but you seem to have too much in spades and not enough aces to want to defend. Accordingly, a retreat to three spades seems wise.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 7 6
 K 4 2
 K 7 6 3
♣ J 5
South West North East
Pass
1 Pass 1♠ 2♣
2♠ 3♣ Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

No man can lose what he never had.

Izaak Walton


North North
East-West ♠ A K
 J 4 3
 Q 6 5
♣ Q J 10 9 7
West East
♠ J 9 7 3 2
 10 7 5
 3 2
♣ K 6 2
♠ 10 5 4
 A Q 9 8
 10 9 8 7 4
♣ A
South
♠ Q 8 6
 K 6 2
 A K J
♣ 8 5 4 3
South West North East
1♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

♠3

Put yourself in East's shoes and see if you can do the math in today's deal.

When South jumps directly to three no-trumps over one club, West leads the spade jack and your first question is what is South’s likely distribution? Very probably he has 3-3-3-4 pattern with a minor and 13-15 points — possibly a 12-count with good intermediates. Declarer wins the lead in dummy, and calls for the club queen. Your ace holds the trick.

Now is the time for some more counting. Dummy has 13 points; you expect declarer to have about the same, and you have nine. Partner can have only one significant high card, thus the only suit that could produce three winners for your side is hearts. If you lead a low heart that will do the job at once if partner has the king, but if what declarer has that card and partner has the heart 10 plus an entry in the form of the club king? Now leading the heart ace won’t do the job, nor will the eight or nine, as declarer will run that to the jack.

The only card to help your cause is the queen. If South covers with the king, partner is well-placed to play his heart 10 through dummy’s jack when in with the club king. And if South ducks, a low heart next will keep defensive communications open and lead to five tricks for the defense.


Just as in today's deal you were all set to jump to three no-trumps, but the opposition intervention allows you to cuebid two hearts, and maybe reach the no-trump game from partner's hand. That would be a good idea any time partner had a positional heart stopper (such as queen doubleton or queen-third).

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 8 6
 K 6 2
 A K J
♣ 8 5 4 3
South West North East
Pass 1♣ 1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, January 5th, 2015

To dry one's eyes and laugh at a fall,
And, baffled, get up and begin again.

Robert Browning


South North
East-West ♠ Q 10 4
 K 7 2
 J 10 9 5
♣ Q 8 7
West East
♠ 9 8 6 3
 A Q J 10 9
 A 6
♣ 5 4
♠ 5
 8 5 4 3
 8 7 4 3 2
♣ A 9 6
South
♠ A K J 7 2
 6
 K Q
♣ K J 10 3 2
South West North East
1♠ 2 2♠ 3
4♠ All pass    

A

In today's deal the slip that declarer made was an elementary one, but the play seemed so straightforward that many players would relax, expecting to have 10 tricks on top, and would not see the significance of their mistake.

Against four spades West decided to go for a forcing defense by leading the heart ace then queen. It looks normal for South to take this with the king and discard a club from hand, assuming that he would simply lose the two minor-suit aces in the fullness of time.

This was what our declarer did, but he paid for his carelessness by going down. He drew two rounds of trump to find the bad news, then advanced the diamond king, and West won the first diamond (if he ducks, declarer reverts to clubs and survives unscathed) and played a third heart to reduce declarer to trump equality with him. Now declarer tried the club king. When East ducked, declarer played a second club and East won and gave his partner a club ruff. Had declarer drawn trump before playing a second club, the defenders could have run the hearts when in with the club ace.

The correct discard at trick two is a diamond. Declarer then draws trumps and continues by playing on clubs. The defenders can take their ace and force declarer again, but he runs his winners and concedes trick 13 to the diamond ace. In retrospect it is hard to imagine why one would take any other approach…and yet, the mistake is hardly an unreasonable one.


You might look for an alternative to leading a doubleton honor into a hand that has promised at least one heart guard. But here any choice looks just as dangerous, and the one thing you know about a heart lead is that you are planning to set up a long suit, to which partner will have an entry. So lead the heart jack.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ J 7 2
 J 4
 Q 7 5 2
♣ 8 5 4 3
South West North East
1 1 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, January 4th, 2015

What is your opinion on opening two no-trump with a weak doubleton, or with a five-card major, or indeed with both? I recently picked up ♠ A-Q-10-7-3,  9-5,  A-Q-5, ♣ A-K-J, and elected to open one spade. My partner disagreed with my perception of the hand's flaws for an opening of two no-trump. What do you think?

Looking Lively, Pleasanton, Calif.

You should appreciate that all the alternatives to opening two no-trump are far more seriously flawed. You misstate the hand's strength by opening one spade — and also leave yourself without any sensible rebids no matter what partner does. Open two no-trump and settle for imperfection. The best is the enemy of the good.

Do you favor an ace or king opening lead from length holding including both cards, and what is your rationale for the choice?

Robber Baron, Atlanta, Ga.

The king from ace-king for me. The only real problem holding opposite an ambiguous king lead is something like jack-third (and this really only presents a problem with dummy holding neither the queen nor ace, and 3-plus cards. In other words, you generally know when to signal attitude and when not. Additionally, this method lets an ace lead deny the king.

How much do you need to make a free bid in response to a take-out double? In second seat after hearing the auction start one diamond – pass — one no-trump double – two clubs, should I bid two spades holding: ♠ J-9-7-3,  7-5,  10-8-6-5, ♣ A-7-4, or is passing more discreet?

Entry-Level, Great Falls, Mont.

This hand is on the cusp for acting. I probably would stretch to bid, buoyed by the fact that my failure to act initially or cuebid two diamonds now limits my hand a little. But make my side-suit shape flatter and I could be persuaded to pass, especially if the vulnerability was against me.

Holding: ♠ 10-8-6-5,  K-2,  Q-9-8-6-3 ♣ A 4 I heard my partner open one diamond, and my RHO overcall one heart. I thought all three of the choices of raising diamonds to the two- or three-level, doubling, or bidding one no-trump had merit. What do you say?

Spoiled for Choice, Boise, Idaho

When you hold support for partner's minor and four cards in the other major you will normally double first, then support partner. Bidding one spade shows five here, of course. One no-trump looks wrong with only one heart stop, and if you raise diamonds you may never find spades. By the way, remember that a jump raise of diamonds in competition is frequently played these days as preemptive rather than invitational.

I wonder if you could tell me what criteria one should use as to whether to pass or open (and if the latter, at what level) a hand like: ♠ Q-10-6-5-4-3,  A-J,  Q-J-5, ♣ J-3. How do position and vulnerability – or even the form of scoring – affect this question?

Careful Does It, Montgomery, Ala.

Almost any 11-count without a vulnerable singleton honor is a one-level opening for me. Change the diamond five into a small club and I might open two spades in second seat. The most important piece of advice I can give is always to open when you have a good suit. No hand with a good suit falls between a weak-two and one-level opening bid. You can pass a hand with a bad suit, of course. This applies at any form of scoring. In second seat be more disciplined than in first and surely in third seat.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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