Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, November 27th, 2019

A knockdown argument: ’Tis but a word and a blow.

John Dryden


W North
E-W ♠ Q J 3 2
 9 8
 10 9 2
♣ 9 8 7 5
West East
♠ A K 9 8 5
 7 4 3
 4 3
♣ J 6 4
♠ 10 7 6
 A K J 6
 K J 8 7 5
♣ 10
South
♠ 4
 Q 10 5 2
 A Q 6
♣ A K Q 3 2
South West North East
  Pass Pass 1
2 ♣ Pass 3 ♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

♠A

On this deal from last year’s Blue Ribbon Pairs, Dan Jacob reached a delicate three no-trump after a sporting raise by his partner. Then the world-class defenders had a couple of chances to beat him, none of which was easy. See what you think.

West contemplated doubling the final contract but eventually passed and led the spade ace, shifting to the heart seven in response to East’s suit-preference spade 10. East was hoping his side could establish a third heart trick before declarer knocked out his partner’s spade king.

East took his heart king and might have contended that West’s failure to make a negative double suggested declarer had 1=4=3=5 shape. If so, only a club exit would avoid handing declarer a finesse. On East’s actual choice of the heart jack, South won his heart queen and cashed four clubs, ending in dummy.

Declarer then advanced the diamond 10, covered all around. Next came the last club winner, forcing East to pitch his spade. The heart 10 exit saw East cash two tricks, but he finally had to concede the last two tricks to the split diamond tenace.

If East had passively shifted to the club 10 at trick three, declarer would have been unable to play effectively on both red suits. He probably would have crossed to dummy in clubs to play a heart to the jack and queen. East could then throw a diamond on the last club to avoid the strip-squeeze, or pitch a spade and exit with a diamond honor at trick 11.



Two clubs. For most partnerships, a one-no-trump advance to a take-out double promises some values. Here, you must bid two clubs and hope you are not doubled or called on to take another action. In my opinion, the range for the one no-trump call is 5-9 or so.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q J 3 2
 9 8
 10 9 2
♣ 9 8 7 5
South West North East
  1 ♠ Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, November 26th, 2019

The object of punishment is prevention from evil; it never can be made impulsive to good.

Horace Mann


N North
E-W ♠ K 7 3
 9 6 3 2
 K 9 5
♣ J 3 2
West East
♠ Q 9 2
 K Q 10
 4 3
♣ Q 9 8 7 4
♠ 4
 A J 8 5 4
 A Q J 8
♣ A K 6
South
♠ A J 10 8 6 5
 7
 10 7 6 2
♣ 10 5
South West North East
    Pass 1
3 ♠ Pass Pass Dbl.
Pass 4 4 ♠ Dbl.
All pass      

4

Even at the top level, bidding too much and daring your opponents to beat you may work out well. That was the case last year in Hawaii in the Blue Ribbon semifinals.

Using the favorable vulnerability and his four-card side suit as an excuse to pre-empt to the limit, South stretched to bid three spades over the one-heart opening. North might have been inclined to raise, but knowing his partner could have a wide variety of hands for the pre-empt opposite a passed hand, he remained silent for the moment. East protected with a double, and West bid four hearts. Only then did North come in with four spades, a questionable decision, tactically speaking. East doubled with his top tricks, and there they played.

West led the diamond four to the jack. East cashed the top two clubs and continued the suit. Declarer ruffed, cashed the spade ace and guessed correctly to run the spade jack, picking up the suit. With time on his side, he could draw trumps and knock out the diamonds, escaping for three down.

After the diamond lead, won by East, the best defense is not obvious, but I think he can work it out. He must cash the top clubs and underlead in hearts for a further diamond play.

The defense can now take the first six tricks. When East plays the diamond eight, West ruffs in with the spade nine to promote his own queen for four down. There is a big difference between plus 500 and plus 800 in a pairs game when your side can make 680, so this miss was costly.



Pass. This is no time to introduce such a poor heart suit. There is no need to respond now, and you do not want to get partner excited. If partner voluntarily takes another bid, you can come alive later. Put one of the kings in the heart suit, and one heart would be fine. But as it is, you can be fairly confident you will get a second chance at a low level.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 7 3
 9 6 3 2
 K 9 5
♣ J 3 2
South West North East
    1 ♣ Dbl.
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, November 25th, 2019

Enjoyment of the work consists in participation in the creative state of the artist.

Martin Heidegger


S North
E-W ♠ J 9
 K Q 6 5
 K 7 4
♣ 7 6 3 2
West East
♠ K
 10 7 4
 10 9 8
♣ Q J 10 9 5 4
♠ Q 10 4 2
 8 2
 A 6 5 3 2
♣ A K
South
♠ A 8 7 6 5 3
 A J 9 3
 Q J
♣ 8
South West North East
1 ♠ Pass 1 NT Pass
2 Pass 3 All pass
       

♣Q

The 2018 Hawaii Fall North American Bridge Championships were attended by many top players. Its main attraction is the Reisinger board-a-match, with Josef Blass’ team winning out in a close-fought contest.

This deal from the second final of the Blue Ribbon will appeal to those of you who like eccentric endings. East-West defeated three hearts on a spade ruff. Ah, but who got it? If you are a devotee of Sam Loyd puzzles, you might suspect that the answer is always the least likely suspect.

Against three hearts, Steve Robinson led the club queen, and Peter Boyd as East overtook to continue the suit. South ruffed and played out the diamond queen, Boyd winning to return the suit. When declarer played the spade ace and another spade, Robinson pitching his remaining diamond, Boyd won his spade queen before returning a diamond.

When South discarded, West could score his heart four and return a top club, Boyd having to pitch a diamond to keep the spades from being ruffed out. Declarer ruffed and led a spade, ruffed and over-ruffed.

At this point, declarer had a lock for his contract. Because West could be counted out at 1=3=3=6 distribution, trumps had to be breaking. He could have crossed to the heart jack, ruffed a spade high, drawn trumps and claimed.

Instead, declarer led a club and ruffed, Boyd discarding his last spade. Declarer could cash the heart ace, but at trick 12 he had to lead spades, and it was East who over-ruffed dummy’s heart six for the setting trick.



Lead the spade nine. Your goal is to get partner in to give you a diamond ruff, and the way to tip him off is to lead an unnatural card. In standard methods, the nine is typically led from shortness. As you have preempted in spades, partner should have little trouble reading this as a suit-preference signal for diamonds. If you had a void club, you would lead the spade two.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 10 9 7 5 2
 Q 8
 —
♣ Q J 5 3
South West North East
3 ♠ Dbl. Pass 4
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, November 24th, 2019

I’ve often seen writers discuss when to charge a one- or twotrick penalty after a revoke. I’ve seen it asserted that in rubber bridge, if you did not bid game, adding the extra penalty trick(s) would not entitle you to the game bonus. Is the situation different for duplicate bridge or if using Chicago scoring?

Dazed and Confused, Sioux Falls, S.D.

The revoke law never does anything except change the number of tricks actually won. The contract always remains unaltered. So, the penalty tricks from a revoke may produce overor undertricks (or change a making contract into one going down or vice versa), no matter what form of bridge you play. But they do not change the contract.

Some of our opponents at my local club compete aggressively (on occasion frivolously) over our strong no-trump. Would you recommend we play penalty doubles in an attempt to teach them a sharp lesson?

Fetch the Axe, Janesville, Wis.

Try to maximize the frequency of your double as opposed to trying to optimize the results from the call. Use double for take-out at your first turn to act, since you will have that hand more often than a penalty double. This applies both to responder’s and opener’s double — both under and over the trump. Double of a purely artificial call should be values by responder, showing that suit by opener.

Playing a knockout match, I was dealt ♠ A-Q-9-7-3,  8-7-2,  A-J-6, ♣ Q-9. I heard my left-hand opponent pre-empt to three hearts, and then my partner bid four clubs. What should be forcing here — and what would a fourheart bid mean?

Well Placed, Kailua, Hawaii

Four spades and four diamonds sound natural and non-forcing to me. So, four hearts should be an all-purpose good hand with club support without reference to heart control. I’d make that call and accept a signoff in five clubs.

In a recent column, you posed a problem with ♠ A-J-9-2,  J-5,  5-2, ♣ A-J-8-4-3, in which you heard your partner overcall two diamonds over one heart. How much weaker would you have to be to pass here? Since partner only overcalled, are you likely to make game when you don’t have a fit?

Skeptical Sam, Wausau, Wis.

My view of two-level overcalls is that a doubleton and a ruffing value constitute decent enough support. I try not to come in on bad suits here, and I expect the same of my partner! This hand is certainly strong enough to look for game with a two-heart advance. That shows values and asks partner to describe his hand further.

When you have a choice of eight-card fits, is it better to choose a 5-3 fit or a 4-4 fit?

Breaking Badly, Spokane, Wash.

With a 4-4 trump fit, it may be easier to generate discards and extra ruffing tricks with the 5-3 fit on the side. By contrast, if you play the 5-3 suit, it will not allow you to generate discards from the 4-4 side suit. It is hard to identify in advance where discards will not be relevant, so head for the 4-4 fit when you can.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, November 23rd, 2019

There is no great genius without some touch of madness.

Seneca


N North
E-W ♠ A 10 6
 9 7 4
 8 7 6
♣ K Q 5 4
West East
♠ J 8 7 3
 J 6
 A J 9 5
♣ 10 8 7
♠ 2
 K Q 10 8 5 2
 K 10 4 2
♣ 6 3
South
♠ K Q 9 5 4
 A 3
 Q 3
♣ A J 9 2
South West North East
    Pass 2
2 ♠ Pass 3 ♠ Pass
4 ♠ All pass    

J

At the top level of bridge, there is no substitute for inspiration. On the deal that follows, from the quarterfinals of the 1995 Marlboro Bermuda Bowl, Joey Silver of Canada combined technique with gut reactions to produce a game swing.

Like everyone else, he reached four spades after East had preempted in hearts. When East overtook the lead of the heart jack with the queen, the natural thing for declarer to do seemed to be to win, lay down the spade king and play another spade, hoping to guess well! In the context of the auction, the odds are very close between playing for the drop or the finesse in spades, but nearly everyone played for the drop and went one down.

Silver found a significant psychological improvement on this line when he ducked the first trick, leaving East on play. He was hoping that East would reveal a little more about his sidesuit shape. For example, if East had shifted to a club, it would have been a fair bet that he had a singleton there, and thus not a singleton trump. Similarly, it might have been tempting for East to shift to a doubleton diamond, which also would have given Silver valuable information.

When East actually continued with a second heart, Silver inferred that he had at least three diamonds and at least two clubs. Thus, the spade finesse became the indicated play. He won the heart ace, cashed the spade king, and finessed the spade 10 to make his contract.



Although you have only an 8-count, you should bid two hearts now. The reason is that you will never get your hand off your chest if you start with a negative double. The opponents will raise spades (often to an uncomfortable level), and you will wish you had made the slight overbid of getting your suit in at a more hospitable time.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 2
 K Q 10 8 5 2
 K 10 4 2
♣ 6 3
South West North East
    1 ♣ 1 ♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, November 22nd, 2019

I am the master of my fate; I am the captain of my soul.

William Ernest Henley


W North
N-S ♠ 10 7
 9 6
 8 7 5 3
♣ 9 8 6 5 2
West East
♠ 8 4 2
 K 10 8 7 5 3
 6 4
♣ J 7
♠ Q 6 5
 A J 4 2
 K J
♣ A Q 10 4
South
♠ A K J 9 3
 Q
 A Q 10 9 2
♣ K 3
South West North East
  2 Pass 4
4 ♠ Pass Pass Dbl.
All pass      

7

Sometimes, Destiny seems to produce a deal straight from the textbooks, albeit a very advanced manual in this case. In the North American Swiss Teams, this deal was played around the room and had the smell of a contrived hand about it, with the opponents’ cards cooperating completely.

After a light weak-two opening by West, Steve Levy of Las Vegas was virtually stampeded into bidding four spades on the South cards — not too unwillingly, until he saw the virtually useless dummy come down. Even though the North hand was one card away from a genuine Yarborough, Levy did his best to exploit such meager assets.

The defense led two rounds of hearts. Levy ruffed and played the spade jack out of his hand! That put East in a dilemma. If he ducked, it would allow declarer to play diamonds from his hand (retaining the diamond two) to establish the suit. If he took his queen, then whether he played another heart (which would be ruffed in dummy) or a plain suit, declarer would have just enough spades left to draw trumps and cross to dummy with his diamond two, to eventually play a club toward his king.

Instead, East took his spade queen and exited in trumps. Levy won in dummy, finessed in diamonds and drew trumps. Dummy’s diamond eight provided an entry to play up to the club king.

As North proudly pointed out, his hand had been good for two tricks, “but not quite enough to redouble, partner!”



Bid two hearts. This type of hand, weak with a fair six-card suit, is perfect to act with. As you have shown, you cannot double to show values, which would start at around a 9-count, so this is non-forcing. You might prefer another high card or some more shape, but you cannot have everything.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 4 2
 K 10 8 7 5 3
 6 4
♣ J 7
South West North East
    1 ♣ 1 NT
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, November 21st, 2019

Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Albert Einstein (paraphrased)


N North
Both ♠ 10 8 5 4
 A 8 3
 7
♣ A K 10 9 3
West East
♠ Q 7 6 2
 K 10 9 4 2
 A
♣ J 6 2
♠ J 9
 J 7 5
 Q 8 6 4 3 2
♣ Q 8
South
♠ A K 3
 Q 6
 K J 10 9 5
♣ 7 5 4
South West North East
    1 ♣ Pass
3 NT All pass    

4

Today’s South belonged to the “quick and dirty” school. He leapt straight to three no-trump over North’s one-club opening, challenging West to find the right lead. That player did not. His choice of the heart four ran to declarer’s queen, who now had six tricks on top.

South could see the danger, if he played on clubs, of losing the setting tricks in hearts, should West have long hearts and the diamond ace. So declarer guessed well to cross to the club ace and play a diamond to the jack. If West had won the queen, declarer would have ducked the next heart, won the third, crossed to the spade ace and led out high diamonds, making the tricks he needed from that suit on a normal break.

As it was, the diamond jack forced the ace. Now, after ducking the next heart to cut the defensive communications, declarer won the heart continuation, crossed to the spade ace and laid down the diamond king. Had everyone followed, declarer would have had to guess whether to press on with diamonds or revert to clubs. The diamond play looks best to me, since playing on clubs works only if West began with honor-third or a small doubleton in clubs.

But as it was, when West showed out on the diamond king, South changed tack and led a club to the nine, leaving communications open while trying to keep West off play. When East won the club queen and returned a spade, declarer went up with the king and claimed three more club tricks to land his game.



This hand is worth one bid, so doubling is the best call, getting all the suits in. If you had the spade king as well, you might consider an overcall of two clubs, having enough to double back in later. But even then, it feels right to get the whole story off your chest at one time.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 8 5 4
 A 8 3
 7
♣ A K 10 9 3
South West North East
      1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, November 20th, 2019

The intellect of man is forced to choose Perfection of the life, or of the work.

W.B. Yeats


S North
N-S ♠ 7 6 5
 10 5 4
 K 8 7 4
♣ A K 7
West East
♠ A Q 3 2
 Q J 9 7
 10 2
♣ Q J 10
♠ 9 4
 —
 Q J 6 5 3
♣ 9 6 5 4 3 2
South
♠ K J 10 8
 A K 8 6 3 2
 A 9
♣ 8
South West North East
1 Pass 1 NT 2 NT *
3 Pass 4 Pass
Pass Dbl. All pass  

*Minors

♣Q

Terence Reese often asserted that two-suited overcalls on weak hands offer up a fielder’s choice to the opponents, who can either take a penalty when the hand is a misfit, or choose to declare with a blueprint of the distribution. That was certainly the case today when East wandered in over North’s forcing no-trump with less than zero excuse.

South did not exactly hold back when he freely rebid his hearts, and North was delighted to raise. West, not in on the joke, doubled the final contract, completing a revealing sequence.

Declarer took the club queen lead in dummy and assumed he was facing a 4-0 trump split. It was also good odds that the spade ace-queen were offside, so he set his sights on an endplay against West. He had to be careful, though, so as to not damage his chances should the spade queen be to his right.

He began by throwing a spade on the club king and ruffing a club low. He then crossed to the diamond king and returned to the diamond ace, West following all the way. South now led a low heart out of his hand. This had the effect of keeping dummy’s heart 10 as a potential menace for later on.

West went in with the heart jack and did his best when he shifted to a low spade. Declarer took the spade nine with the jack, then threw West back in with three more rounds of hearts. Down to nothing but spades, West had to lead into declarer’s spade tenace for a second time, conceding the doubled game.



Hands with good spade support have several options. Your best call to get your shape and values across is to bid four clubs. You have lots of playing strength in support of spades and what is needed for slam bidding — good trumps and controls. A four-club splinter describes your hand well — short clubs and at least the values for game.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 10 8
 A K 8 6 3 2
 A 9
♣ 8
South West North East
1 Pass 1 ♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, November 19th, 2019

It has, I believe, been often remarked that a hen is only an egg’s way of making another egg.

Samuel Butler


E North
None ♠ J 10 9 2
 3
 K Q J 10 6
♣ K Q 7
West East
♠ 6 4
 K 9 7 5 2
 A 7
♣ J 5 4 3
♠ 8 3
 A Q J 10 4
 9 8 4
♣ A 10 9
South
♠ A K Q 7 5
 8 6
 5 3 2
♣ 8 6 2
South West North East
      1
1 ♠ 4 4 ♠ All pass
       

2

When defensive prospects look bleak and it appears that the only chance of setting a contract lies with partner holding a specific card, you should normally put all your eggs in that particular basket. At pairs you may have to consider whether an unsuccessful defense may cost you overtricks, but at teams the equation is normally a simple one.

Today, when North took the transfer to four spades over four hearts, West decided his best chance to go plus was on defense. While the heart king would have been a reasonable opening salvo — allowing West to retain the lead and possibly play through a tenace in dummy — West actually led the heart two, playing third and fifth leads.

As it was, East won his heart ace, then decided dummy’s diamonds looked so daunting that he needed to cash the club ace before declarer’s clubs disappeared on the diamonds. Alas, that left only the diamond ace for declarer to lose, and the contract came home.

The return at trick two is indeed vital to the success or failure of the contract, and clubs is the right suit to attack. However, the right card to return is not the ace, but the 10 — playing partner for either a doubleton club and trump control, or the diamond ace and the club jack.

As long as West has a key control, he will be able to push another club through the moment he gets in. Now the defenders win the two club tricks they need to take the contract down.



It is reasonable to bid one heart here. While this hand does not meet the traditional requirements for a one-level overcall (good suit or good hand), you have reason to believe that a heart lead would be the best start for the defense, and you would also like to compete. If you had 2=5=3=3 shape, the overcall would be less attractive.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 6 4
 K 9 7 5 2
 A 7
♣ J 5 4 3
South West North East
      1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, November 18th, 2019

Properly speaking, there is no such thing as revenge. Revenge is an act which you want to commit when you are powerless and because you are powerless: As soon as the sense of impotence is removed, the desire evaporates also.

George Orwell


S North
E-W ♠ K Q
 K Q 10 8 3
 Q 7 4 2
♣ 7 3
West East
♠ 10 6 3
 2
 A J 9 8
♣ Q J 10 6 5
♠ A J 9 8 2
 9 6 5
 10
♣ 9 8 4 2
South
♠ 7 5 4
 A J 7 4
 K 6 5 3
♣ A K
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 * Pass
3 Pass 4 All pass
       

*Hearts

♣Q

In today’s deal, South was playing rubber bridge against an opponent to his left who had managed to get his back up on more than one occasion. So when the chance came up to needle him in return, he could not resist the opportunity.

South had opened a strong no-trump and jumped to three hearts over North’s transfer. This showed a reasonable hand with four hearts, and North naturally raised to game.

West’s lead of the club queen went to declarer’s ace. Declarer cashed the trump ace, played a trump to the king, and played a spade. East took his ace and returned a third trump (a diamond would have been no better).

Declarer won, cashed the spade queen, then played a club to hand and ruffed a spade. With trumps drawn and the black suits eliminated, declarer put his hand on the table and asked his opponent if he wanted him to state a line. When West aggressively asked him how he planned to cope with a bad diamond break, South had his answer ready.

“I’m sure you can see I have 10 tricks against any 3-2 diamond break, but a 4-1 break will also prove no problem. I will play a low diamond and follow small from my hand. If the suit is 4-1, then either the player with the singleton will win and give me a ruff-sluff. Or, alternatively, if the player with the four-card suit wins, the best he can do is return the suit, and I will run that lead around to an honor and play back the suit, holding my diamond losers to two.”



Your choice is between a low club and a trump; underleading either of your aces seems like a wild gamble. While a club lead could be effective, it is far more aggressive than the spade lead. Given West’s pre-emptive raise, usually based on five-card support or a good four-card holding, the trump is unlikely to solve a guess declarer would have gotten wrong.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 4
 A Q 10 7 3 2
 A 6 3
♣ K 10 2
South West North East
      1 ♠
2 4 ♠ All pass  

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2019. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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