Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, May 8th, 2015

Lucky to touch it, a shilling a day!

Rudyard Kipling


S North
E-W ♠ K J 9 8 3
 A 5
 3 2
♣ 8 5 3 2
West East
♠ A 4
 K Q 10 9
 J 10 8 4
♣ A Q 9
♠ 2
 J 8 7 4 3 2
 7 6 5
♣ J 10 7
South
♠ Q 10 7 6 5
 6
 A K Q 9
♣ K 6 4
South West North East
1 ♠ Dbl. 3 NT* Pass
4 ♠ All pass    

*Better than a preemptive raise to four spades

K

There were contrasting fortunes in today’s contract of four spades, from a team game. One declarer saw all the possibilities, and exploited the lie of the cards, one relied on good fortune, and got the result he deserved.

One declarer won the heart lead to play trumps at once. He ruffed the next heart, drew the last trump, and tried to drop the diamond jack-10. When the diamond honors failed to put in an appearance he ruffed the fourth diamond, planning to duck a club to West if he could. Alas for him, East remembered to split his club intermediates, and now whatever declarer did, he had to lose three club tricks, and the contract.

In the other room when West led the heart king against four spades, declarer won the ace and ruffed a heart in his hand. He then led a trump from hand. Had West ducked, declarer would have stripped off the diamonds and endplayed West with the trump ace. Seeing this coming, West flew up with the spade ace and returned a trump.

Declarer now played the top three diamonds pitching one club from dummy. Then he continued with the losing diamond nine and pitched another club from dummy. West was allowed to win the diamond jack, but was now endplayed and had either to give declarer a free finesse, or a ruff and sluff. Either way, South was home in his contract.


I have a secret hankering to bid three spades as a fit-jump (promising five decent spades and club support) but this is not a standard agreement so I must find a different approach. Here a simple call of two spades should be natural (and indeed some play it as forcing). I’d expect four spades to be the easiest game to make here if I can find any sort of spade fit; the club support can wait. So two spades it is.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J 9 8 3
 A 5
 3 2
♣ 8 5 3 2
South West North East
  1 2 ♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, May 7th, 2015

Art is the elimination of the unnecessary.

Pablo Picasso


S North
E-W ♠ 10 7 4 2
 A K 6 4
 A 5
♣ 9 6 2
West East
♠ 6
 J 10 8 2
 10 6 4 3
♣ 10 8 7 5
♠ Q J 9
 Q 9 3
 K 8 7 2
♣ J 4 3
South
♠ A K 8 5 3
 7 5
 Q J 9
♣ A K Q
South West North East
1 ♠ Pass 2 NT* Pass
3 ♠ Pass 4 ♠ Pass
6 ♠ All pass    

*Game-forcing spade raise

J

One of the simplest but also most attractive techniques of declarer play that we all learn is an elimination play. If you want the opponents to lead a suit rather than have to lead it yourself, then you try to remove all the other palatable options from the defenders before giving them the lead and forcing them to do something they would otherwise be unwilling to do.

If you can take out all the trumps, or all of a side-suit, the play may be foolproof. But sometimes declarer can only execute a partial strip or elimination of the other suits before throwing an opponent in.

For example, playing in six spades here, South wins the heart lead and tests trumps. When they fail to split, he should not take the diamond finesse. Instead he should attempt to set up an endplay to avoid taking the finesse until or unless it is absolutely necessary.

Declarer leads a second high heart, ruffs a heart and cashes the three high clubs before throwing East in with the master trump. Because he only has diamonds left, East must lead away from the diamond king. This is a partial elimination or strip, because declarer lacked the entries to eliminate hearts completely. Had East held a fourth heart, he would have been able to lead the suit and avoid opening up diamonds to declarer’s advantage. Then South would have been forced to fall back on the finesse, but at least he would have given himself every additional chance.


There are two bids I could not stomach making here. The first is passing; in third seat this is a full opener and passing makes your opponents’ life far too easy. The second is opening one club – anyone who does that deserves to find their partner raising clubs, or leading a club against the opponents’ final contract. Open one heart for the lead; if necessary put down dummy with a spade in your hearts…

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 7 4 2
 A K 6 4
 A 5
♣ 9 6 2
South West North East
    Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

I love my fellow creatures – I do all the good I can –
Yet everybody says I’m such a disagreeable man!
And I can’t think why!

W. S. Gilbert


S North
E-W ♠ A 9 4
 Q 10 6 5
 A 4
♣ 9 8 7 4
West East
♠ Q 7 2
 J 3 2
 J 9 7 3
♣ A Q 3
♠ K 10 8 5
 9 8 4
 10 5
♣ K 10 5 2
South
♠ J 6 3
 A K 7
 K Q 8 6 2
♣ J 6
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 ♣ Pass
2 Pass 3 NT All pass
       

3

In today’s deal, maybe it was a rush of blood to the head, or the flowers that bloom in the spring generating optimism, but something compelled you to open the South hand with a strong no trump. Maybe the light was bad, or the cards dirty? Your partner used Stayman to enquire for four-card majors, and settled in three no-trump. When West leads the diamond three, it is up to you to try to make bricks out of the limited amount of straw available to you.

The solution is based to a certain extent on whether you think it is conceivable that West has led from a three-card suit on this auction; highly unlikely, I would say (indeed, it is a safe guess that West is very likely to be 3-3-4-3 pattern or to have an ‘unleadable’ four-card suit).

If that is so, then I think your best practical chances for the contract lie in deception. You have to be up to ducking the first trick. But you also have to remember that this in itself may not be enough. You must also take care to follow at the first trick with the six, concealing the two, to encourage East to continue the attack on diamonds, in the belief that West has led from a five-card suit. If you do not, he may well find the club switch at trick two.

When the defenders continue diamonds, you can take four diamond winners and later bring hearts home for four tricks to make your game.


This hand is far too good to pass two clubs — you might miss a cold game or even a slam. A simple invitational raise to three clubs should suffice. You may belong in three no-trump, but it will be up to partner to move toward game if he has extra values.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 9 4
 Q 10 6 5
 A 4
♣ 9 8 7 4
South West North East
    1 Pass
1 Pass 2 ♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

In our plain defects,
We already know the brotherhood of man.

Christopher Fry


W North
Both ♠ Q 8 6
 A 7 5
 A Q 5
♣ 9 7 4 2
West East
♠ 2
 J 9 8 3 2
 8 6 2
♣ K Q J 6
♠ J 10 9 4
 6
 J 9 7 3
♣ 10 8 5 3
South
♠ A K 7 5 3
 K Q 10 4
 K 10 4
♣ A
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♣ Pass
1 ♠ Pass 1 NT Pass
3 Pass 3 ♠ Pass
4 NT Pass 5 ♠* Pass
6 ♠ All pass queen  

*Two key cards plus the trump

♣K

A small slam on the North and South cards looks a good proposition; indeed, on a good day all 13 tricks might well roll in. But the battle today was to find the safest route to 12 tricks.

During the auction, South had shown slam interest and a twosuiter at his second turn, then had used Keycard Blackwood to make sure the spades were robust enough to play slam. After winning the club lead, declarer played the spade ace then queen, to discover there was an inevitable trump loser. Now all South needed to guard against losing a heart as well. The key was to prevent East being able to ruff a heart winner then remove dummy’s last trump. South worked out that so long as East held at least one card in hearts, he was likely to be able to achieve his target.

At trick four South cashed the heart ace, then led a low heart towards his hand. East could see that if he ruffed a loser he would be wasting his trump trick to no effect, so he discarded a club. South won with the king in hand, returned to dummy in diamonds and played another heart. Still unable to ruff profitably, East discarded yet again, and South’s heart queen held.

Now came the heart 10, ruffed with dummy’s last trump. East could overruff, but that was the only trick for the defense. In essence, South had combined his heart loser and trump loser on the same trick.


It is tempting to raise to three clubs, but my guess would be that I don’t have quite enough to invite game. A fifth club would make the raise far more attractive, or perhaps as little as an extra queen on the side. As it is, pass, and apologize if you have missed game.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 2
 J 9 8 3 2
 8 6 2
♣ K Q J 6
South West North East
    1 ♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 2 ♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, May 4th, 2015

‘Danger!’ said the old cob. ‘Danger! I welcome danger and adventure. Danger is my middle name.’

E. B. White


N North
None ♠ Q 8 6
 Q J 2
 A J 8 6
♣ K J 9
West East
♠ J 9 5
 K 7 3
 Q 2
♣ A 10 8 6 5
♠ 10 4 3 2
 10 8 5 4
 7 5 4
♣ Q 3
South
♠ A K 7
 A 9 6
 K 10 9 3
♣ 7 4 2
South West North East
    1 Pass
3 NT All pass    

♣6

Today’s deal embodies a very simple principle, but it is worth emphasizing that there are many hands where declarer knows that one of his opponents is the danger hand, and one is the safe hand. In such instances one wants to try to keep the danger hand off lead, and it may even be worthwhile to sacrifice a few percentage points in the play so as to ensure that you achieve your target.

Here West leads a club against three no-trump. East takes dummy’s jack with the queen, then returns the suit, and West clears the clubs. Now declarer has just seven top tricks. He can finesse diamonds either way, and of course since East has short clubs and West long clubs, you would expect East to have the diamond queen. But the percentages are quite close, and if you play East for the diamond queen and you are wrong, you are immediately sunk. A better approach is to play the diamond king and then plan to run the diamond 10. Of course, as the cards lie, this approach is immediately successful. But had the diamond finesse lost, you would have been able to fall back on the heart finesse, giving yourself another 50-50 chance in addition to the first finesse.

This general approach of taking your chances in order, rather than putting all your eggs in one basket, is called an echelon play. My experience is generally that the two chances are better than one.


With your heart suit an unattractive one to lead from, the choice is whether to lead trumps or play for club ruffs. The opponents are known to be in a 5-3 or 4-4 fit (since partner’s double guarantees at least three spades), so leading a trump might mangle partner’s holding. And the possibility of club ruffs looks as good as any way to set up tricks for your side, so I would lead the club jack.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 3
 A 10 8 6 5
 J 10 6 4
♣ J 5
South West North East
  1 Dbl. 1 ♠
2 2 ♠ 3 3 ♠
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, May 3rd, 2015

Last week at our club a question arose regarding an Alert. In a Flannery sequence does a response of two hearts or two spades require an Alert, on the grounds that those responses indicate no game interest? Many of our newer or non-Flannery players would be shut out of the auction, because of the lack of an Alert.

Level Pegging, Bellevue, Wash.

I believe no Alert is required. The bids are a natural suggestion of a place to play. In a bridge club you’d assume that either the opponents will know this, or be able to work it out. I’m no great fan of using conventions to bamboozle opponents, but we can’t spoon-feed everyone – just in case they aren’t paying attention. By contrast, a jump to three hearts or three spades, if weak, should be Alerted, since the alternative interpretation of forcing or invitational could easily be assumed here.

Recently one of my opponents mentioned Goldwater’s Rule after a bid out of turn. I didn’t understand the explanation – could you clarify it for me please.

Term Limits, Eau Claire, Wis.

Tournament Director Harry Goldwater produced a rule but it was for a lead out of turn not an insufficient call. He suggested that when a lead is made out of turn, you should accept it, on the grounds that anyone who cannot work out who is on lead, probably won’t know what to lead either.

Can you comment on the rebid problem here? I held:
♠ Q, K-9-7, K-Q-8-7-4, ♣ A-J-9-3. I opened one diamond and chose to rebid two clubs over my partner’s one spade response. When my partner raised to three clubs, would you pass or explore for game – or even up and bid three no-trump? My partner had stretched with an eight-count and five clubs, so no game was good.

Third Time Lucky, Durango, Colo.

Your soft cards strongly suggest five clubs is not going to make, so the question is how much you need to go looking for no-trump. I would feel far happier with the diamond 10 instead of the four. As it is I would pass reluctantly, expecting neither of our side-suits would set up easily, even if we overcame a weakness in hearts.

I read your column daily in Spokane’s Spokesman Review. In a column around two years ago, you responded to a reader’s request for recommendation for a book for beginners. You recommended two books as I recall. I cut out the article, planned to order at least one of the books, but lost the page I had cut out. I would like to read up on a little bit before I join a bridge group of some kind — hopefully at my skill level.

Johnny on the Spot, Spokane, Wash.

Here are some suggestions: Planning the Play of a Bridge Hand, by Barbara Seagram & David Bird, or Bridge for Dummies by Eddie Kantar. And the Audrey Grant series for ACBL are all excellent.

I was dealt ♠ J-9, Q-7-3-2, A-10-8-6-4, ♣ K-7 and heard my LHO open one heart, over which my partner overcalled one spade. Now came two clubs on my right. Was I supposed to bid at all – and if so what would you recommend? I chose to raise spades treating my doubleton as the equivalent of three small trumps. Was this reasonable?

Advance with Care, Albuquerque, N.M.

In this seat some play fourth-suit doubles here (also called snapdragon or competitive doubles). This would show good but not great diamonds, together with spade tolerance, and values. The same principle would apply if your RHO had raised hearts as opposed to bidding a new suit. Double would be take-out and value-showing.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography,
The Lone Wolff, contact
theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com.
If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015.
If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact
reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, May 2nd, 2015

The blazing evidence of immortality is our dissatisfaction with any other solution.

Ralph Waldo Emerson


North North
North-South ♠ K Q 9
 A K
 Q J 7 6
♣ A Q J 4
West East
♠ 8 7 4 3 2
 6 2
 K 10 9 8 5 4
♣ —
♠ A J 10 6 5
 J 4
 A
♣ K 10 7 6 3
South
♠ —
 Q 10 9 8 7 5 3
 3 2
♣ 9 8 5 2
South West North East
    2 ♣ 2 *
Pass 3 ♣ Dbl. 5 ♣
5 All pass    

* Hearts or the black suits

♠8

Today’s deal came from a correspondent who supplied me with his missed chance for immortality, as usual identified a day too late.

West’s bid of three clubs was an improvisation, designed to confuse, and in a sense he was right; his side had a cheap sacrifice in spades, but the question was whether five hearts would make.

My correspondent ducked the opening spade lead, hoping East would contribute the ace; when this failed, he drew trump in two rounds and ruffed out spades for a diamond discard. However the 5-0 club break was too much for him, and he finished up losing three tricks in the minors. It was only on the next day that one of his opponents pointed out that he had missed his chance.

When the chance at trick one fails, declarer should have used trump entries to ruff out the spade ace, and then pitched a club not a diamond on the top spade. Since East was almost guaranteed to have 5-2-1-5 shape, he must therefore have a singleton diamond honor, given West’s failure to lead a top diamond at trick one. So the play is to exit from dummy with a small diamond, felling East’s ace, ruff the spade return, and play a second diamond, catching West in a Morton’s Fork coup. If he takes his diamond king there are two discards for the clubs; if not, the only losers are a club and a diamond.



These days Leaping Michaels is a popular treatment after your opponents open with a weak two bid. Here a jump to four clubs would show clubs and a major – which would seem ideal. However you need a better hand than this to take the action. A simple call of two spades (hoping to get another chance) is the most sensible course of action.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A J 10 6 5
 J 4
 A
♣ K 10 7 6 3
South West North East
      2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, May 1st, 2015

The Mind of Man My haunt, and the main region of my song.

William Wordsworth


East North
Both ♠ J 9 8
 A 7
 A K 10 3
♣ 10 7 6 4
West East
♠ 7 4 3
 J 9 8 5 4 2
 6 2
♣ K 3
♠ —
 10 6
 Q 8 5 4
♣ A Q J 9 8 5 2
South
♠ A K Q 10 6 5 2
 K Q 3
 J 9 7
♣ —
South West North East
      3 ♣
4 ♠ Pass 5 Pass
6 ♣ Pass 6 Pass
7 ♠ All pass    

5

Neither North nor South held back on this deal. North’s five diamond call was a cuebid in support of spades, and a further exchange of cuebids saw North at his next turn guarantee first round heart control when he bid six diamonds, since he was looking for a grand slam when South had denied the heart ace. Now South decided the grand slam was unlikely to be worse than a diamond finesse.

West led the heart five against seven spades, and declarer saw that there was no rush to take the diamond finesse. After winning the heart lead in hand, then entering dummy with a top trump, declarer ruffed a club in hand. Now he repeated the process, then cashed the remaining hearts and ran all but one of his trumps. When East turned up with only two cards in the majors, the prospects of a diamond finesse succeeding were poor, but look what happened to East when declarer discarded dummy’s small diamonds on the trumps.

In the four-card ending South had reduced to one trump and three diamonds, while dummy had two clubs and the diamond ace-king. That left East struggling for a discard from his three diamonds to the queen and the club ace-queen. If he threw a club, dummy’s ten could be established with a ruff; when he parted with a diamond, declarer cashed both of dummy’s diamonds. Now South’s diamond jack became a winner, while he still had a trump in hand to reach it.

 


The underlying message from this auction will not be agreed by everyone, but I believe that at this point in the auction one should not try to improve the partscore. With a bad hand, one passes three clubs and hopes for the best. A call of three hearts here is natural suggesting extra hearts and not a complete bust, and seems the right call now.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 7 4 3
 J 9 8 5 4 2
 6 2
♣ K 3
South West North East
  1 ♠ Dbl. Pass
2 Pass 3 ♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, April 30th, 2015

One has not only an ability to perceive the world but an ability to alter one’s perception of it; more simply, one can change things by the manner in which one looks at them.

Tom Robbins


South North
Neither ♠ J 5
 J 9 4
 Q 4 3
♣ A Q 7 5 3
West East
♠ 10 7 3
 Q 6 2
 A 9 8
♣ 10 8 4 2
♠ A 9 8 4
 A 8 5 3
 10 5 2
♣ J 6
South
♠ K Q 6 2
 K 10 7
 K J 7 6
♣ K 9
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
       

♣2

John Armstrong’s death some six years ago robbed England of one of its finest players. He was in action on today’s hand demonstrating some neat inferential card reading.

The bidding in both rooms to three no-trump saw the lead was the lead of the club two, to the three, jack and king. The first declarer set up his clubs by conceding a trick to West’s 10.That player’s low heart switch went to the ace, and when South played low on the heart return, the defenders could set up hearts and cash the 13th heart when East got in with the spade ace.

In our second room Armstrong drew the right inference from the lead as to West’s distribution. Given that most defenders would prefer to lead a major when Stayman has not been employed, the lead from a broken four-card suit suggested that West might have no second four-card suit. Instead of continuing with clubs and setting up a winner there for the opponents, Armstrong played on diamonds at trick two.

West won the second diamond and shifted to the heart two. East took the ace and returned the three, but since West’s low heart two suggested that West might hold a heart honor, declarer rose with the king, blocking the hearts.

Next he dislodged the spade ace, and although East could play a heart to West’s queen, nothing could now stop declarer from regaining the lead. At that point he could take three clubs, three diamonds, two spades and one heart for his contract.



While you have a maximum for your initial call, you have no clear way forward, and it seems like a breach of the law of total tricks to advance to the three-level with only three-card support. A three-club call here would suggest six, and a hand suited to offense than this, but it may be the least lie. Double would be penalty here, by the way, and pass could easily work out here.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ J 5
 J 9 4
 Q 4 3
♣ A Q 7 5 3
South West North East
    1 Pass
2 Pass Pass 2 ♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Better the day, better the deed.

Thomas Middleton


South North
North-South ♠ A K 10
 A 10 3
 A 6 4 3
♣ K J 2
West East
♠ 5 2
 Q 9 8 6 2
 Q 10 9 8
♣ 8 4
♠ J 8 3
 J
 K J 7 5
♣ 10 9 7 6 5
South
♠ Q 9 7 6 4
 K 7 5 4
 2
♣ A Q 3
South West North East
1 ♠ Pass 2 ♣ Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
4 ♣ Pass 4 Pass
5 ♣ Pass 6 ♠ All pass
       

♣8

The European open championships in San Remo saw a couple of British teams collect medals. Today’s deal comes from the de Botton team’s successful quarterfinal encounter against a strong Dutch squad.

The Dutch North-South had failed to reach slam here, but in the other room Artur Malinowski and Janet de Botton played six spades on the auction shown.

Janet de Botton found a successful line of play. She won the diamond ace, cashed dummy’s heart ace and played a heart back towards her king. It would not have done East any good to ruff thin air, so he threw a club, and declarer won her king and exited with a heart. When West won and continued the suit, declarer ruffed high in the dummy, then cashed the spade king and ran the spade 10, finessing East for the jack. When the spade 10 held, she crossed to hand with a club, drew the last trump, and claimed the remainder.

An alternative, and perhaps safer, approach would have been a dummy reversal. Declarer wins the opening lead, cashes the diamond ace and ruffs a diamond, plays a spade to the ace and ruffs a diamond. Then he cashes the spade queen, and plays a club to dummy. Now he ruffs a diamond, leads another club to dummy, and draws the last trump, pitching a heart from hand. He can cash one further heart and club winner, simply conceding a heart at the end.



It is very tempting to raise partner; after all one is always told to support with support. Here I’m dubious as to whether this is right, as your whole hand is defense to diamonds, and your partner may picture a more offensively oriented hand than this. Nonetheless I will raise, with misgivings. With the spade 10 instead of the jack, I pass.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ J 8 3
 J
 K J 7 5
♣ 10 9 7 6 5
South West North East
Pass Pass 1 ♠ 2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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