Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, March 16th, 2015

Man needs to suffer. When he does not have real griefs he creates them.

Jose Marti


North North
Both ♠ K Q 9 8 4 3
 9 7 4
 K J 4
♣ 3
West East
♠ 10
 J 10 6 5
 Q 8 7 2
♣ A K 5 2
♠ J 7 6 2
 K 8 3
 5 3
♣ Q 9 7 6
South
♠ A 5
 A Q 2
 A 10 9 6
♣ J 10 8 4
South West North East
    Pass Pass
1 NT Pass 4* Pass
4♠ All pass    

*Texas transfer to spades

♣K

At last year’s spring nationals in Dallas the Swiss Teams event threw up this technical problem, on what looks like everybody’s four spade contract. Incidentally, the auction featured a Texas Transfer. Yes, everything is bigger in Texas, but on this occasion North was playing a style where a transfer and raise to game would have been a mild slam-try.

The defenders lead a top club and shift to the heart jack — a normal if unchallenging defense. You win the queen, then play the spade ace and a second spade. West follows with the 10 then discards a club. How should you take it from there?

It looks natural to try to find West with the diamond queen, but this is not very much better than a 50% chance. If you misguess diamonds, (imagine the same layout as in the diagram but with the diamond queen and five switched) the defenders will clear hearts, and then East may be able to ruff the third diamond, to prevent you from getting the discard you need of dummy’s heart loser.

The solution is simple: cash the third top trump, to prevent accidents, then take the diamond king and lead towards the diamond ace. If East ruffs in, you have no diamond loser. If East follows suit, you win the diamond ace and play a third diamond. The defenders cannot stop you from winning the heart ace and pitching the heart on the remaining high diamond. Even though they can ruff in, the loser has gone away.


It feels right to lead trumps here, as dummy will surely be very short in spades, and you may get the opportunity to prevent declarer scoring his trumps separately. Because you have the clubs under control, declarer is relatively unlikely to be able to obtain too many discards on that suit.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ K 8 5 4
 8 5
 Q 5 4
♣ K 10 7 4
South West North East
Pass 1♣ 1 1♠
2 Pass Pass 2
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, March 15th, 2015

What is your view on which card to lead from three, four or five small — and do circumstances alter cases as to what to lead?

Small Fry, Grand Junction, Colo.

At trick one I low from three or four small in partner’s suit if he might read a high card as shortness. I’d lead the highest card I could afford if I had bid the suit or supported partner. I hate leading middle from three cards. From four or five small cards I normally lead fourth, unless I’d already shown my length, or could see that partner might need to shift to another suit, in which I had a good holding. Second highest might then be the indicated choice.

When I opened one heart holding: ♠ 10-3, K-Q-7-5-3, K-2, ♣ A-Q-3-2, my partner responder with a call of one no-trump. Naturally I rebid two clubs and my partner now emerged with two spades. After the deal was over he told me this could not be natural, and must be a club raise – but why not simply raise clubs with that hand?

Striking Out, Anchorage, AK.

As your partner did not respond one spade initially, two spades can be used to show a club raise with a maximum in high cards. That allows a direct raise to three clubs to be based on distribution not high cards – say five trumps and 6-8 HCP.

I had a rebid problem when I dealt myself: ♠ 9-3, Q-3, K-Q-8-2, ♣ A-10-7-3-2. I passed and heard my partner bid one heart at favorable vulnerability, over which my RHO overcalled one spade. I made a negative double, and my LHO jumped to three spades, passed back to me. Should I pass, perhaps playing my partner to be light or even subminimum for his initial action?

Hubble Bubble, Monterey Calif.

A double of three spades implies this sort of shape and values. You might bring home 10 tricks in any one of your side’s possible fits — and you can only make allowances for your partner just so far! He could have quite a good hand and still be unwilling to commit to the four-level, since you do have an ace more than you have yet shown.

I was playing with my rubber bridge group and made a three heart response to a one club opening with seven hearts and a nine-count. We played in a somewhat hopeless game as my partner did not understand what I was trying to tell her, namely that I had 7-11 points and a proper seven-card heart suit — a preemptive response. Everyone at the table said I could not make such a bid — preempts were for opening bids only.

Flown the Coop, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

You are right and your colleagues are wrong. But typically the range for a preempt would be 4-8 points, so not invitational except facing extras and a fit. With nine or 10 points I’d bid one heart then jump in hearts and mean it as invitational, not forcing.

I picked up: ♠ 3, A-Q-4-3, A-Q-9-5-3-2, ♣ K-J, and opened one diamond. What would you recommend as the rebid after partner responds one no-trump? I considered passing, and also various bids in either of my long suits, or even raising no-trumps, and could not make up my mind.

Groundling, Miami, Fla.

Passing does not look right — the hand has potential for game, but one no-trump might go down on a bad day! I’d recommend a simple call of two hearts, intending to rebid three diamonds. A perfectly reasonable alternative would be to jump to three diamonds, ignoring the hearts, to get across your invitational values.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, March 14th, 2015

Life is a long preparation for something that never happens.

W. B. Yeats


South North
North-South ♠ A K 10 7 2
 7 5
 A K 3
♣ A 7 3
West East
♠ 6
 Q J 9 8 2
 J 7 6 4
♣ 9 5 2
♠ J 9 8 5 3
 10
 10 9 5
♣ J 10 8 4
South
♠ Q 4
 A K 6 4 3
 Q 8 2
♣ K Q 6
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
2♠ Pass 5 NT* Pass
6 Pass 6 NT All pass

*Pick a slam

Q

In today’s slam South saw at once that he was very well placed to make 12 tricks. All he needed was four spade tricks, so he intended to cash the spade queen and finesse the 10 as a safety play on the second round of the suit, protecting himself against a five-one spade break with West having the length.

Accordingly he won the opening lead in hand and took the spade queen and led a second spade toward dummy. When West discarded, it was time for a new plan.

South took the spade king, then played off the king and queen of clubs, followed by the king and queen of diamonds. East followed suit both times in each suit, so now South had to commit himself.

Since his combined holding in hearts was longer than in either minor, and West’s opening lead had suggested length there, South mentally crossed his fingers and took his remaining high heart, which had the effect of squeezing East into letting go something he did not want to part with. Not surprisingly he chose a small diamond, which seemed safe enough. But South now took the diamond ace, forcing East to pitch a club. That allowed South to play off dummy’s remaining club honor, reducing dummy and East down to just three spades each. At this point declarer led a low spade from the board, forcing East to win and lead into dummy’s spade tenace at trick 12.


You should re-open with a double here, showing extra values with at least tolerance for the unbid suit, diamonds. There is, I admit, a possibility that your partner may believe you have better hearts than you do, but if your partner bids two hearts you can worry about that on the next round of the auction.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A K 10 7 2
 7 5
 A K 3
♣ A 7 3
South West North East
  1♣ Pass 1
1♠ 2♣ Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, March 13th, 2015

This shows how much easier it is to be critical than to be correct.

Benjamin Disraeli


West North
Neither ♠ Q
 A K Q J 9
 A J 7
♣ A 7 4 2
West East
♠ 4 3
 —
 10 8 6 4 2
♣ K Q 10 8 6 5
♠ K 9 8 7 6 5
 10 8 5 2
 —
♣ J 9 3
South
♠ A J 10 2
 7 6 4 3
 K Q 9 5 3
♣ —
South West North East
  3♣ Dbl. 4♣
4♠ Pass 5 Pass
6 All pass    

♣K

When you reach the wrong strain, and at the wrong level, there is a special incentive to play it well, or partner will be more than usually unhappy.

It was remarkably unlucky that six diamonds was not a claim – but there again, in a perfect world North-South would have played in seven hearts.

At the table South won the opening lead, discarding a spade on the club ace, and led to the diamond jack to get the bad news. Undaunted, he ran the spade queen, East ducking his king, and then played three more rounds of trumps, leaving West with the high trump.

Now declarer went after hearts, but it was easy for West to delay ruffing in until the fourth round of the suit (if he mistimes his ruff, declarer will get his spade away, either sooner or later). Then he exited with a club, and South had a spade loser at the end.

To make the slam legitimately, South must ruff the opening lead in hand and cross to the diamond jack. Then he runs the spade queen and draws three more rounds of trumps, discarding a club from the table. Next he cashes the spade ace, discarding dummy’s last small club, and starts on the hearts. Whenever West ruffs, he must return a club and dummy will be high. Declarer knows West has no more than two spades, since he has five trump and at least six clubs. So he will not have a spade left to lead when he ruffs in.


Whatever you do, please do not make a take-out double or you may find yourself raised to the moon in clubs, and regretting your impetuosity. A one spade overcall is out, because you really ought to have five for that action, and a bid of two diamonds might lose spades for good, as well as being an overbid. Pass and hope to get a second shot later when you have learned more.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A J 10 2
 7 6 4 3
 K Q 9 5 3
♣ —
South West North East
      1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, March 12th, 2015

The more things change, the more they remain the same.

Alphonse Karr


South North
East-West ♠ 10 8 7 5
 Q 7 4
 7 5 3 2
♣ Q 4
West East
♠ 6
 9 8 5 2
 J 10 9 4
♣ 10 8 3 2
♠ Q J 9 3
 A J 10
 K Q 8 6
♣ 7 5
South
♠ A K 4 2
 K 6 3
 A
♣ A K J 9 6
South West North East
2♣ Pass 2 Pass
3♣ Pass 3 Pass
3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass

J

The Dyspeptics Club membership changes as time passes, but one thing that never alters is South’s capacity to pick up strong hands. Indeed when a member had been away for six months he said that he didn’t feel properly home until he walked through the door and heard South pick up his cards and heard him open two no-trumps.

In today’s deal South barreled his way to the best game, when North found a temporizing call at his second turn and thereby uncovered the spade fit. Against four spades the diamond jack was led to the ace. Declarer cashed the two top trumps, and when he found the bad news started running the clubs, discarding hearts from dummy. East carefully pitched a diamond on the third club, but ruffed the fourth and drew another round of trumps, and declarer had just nine tricks.

As North pointed out, East had indeed defended well by delaying ruffing in, but South should not have given the defenders the chance to make a nice play.

A far better approach would have been to take just one top spade, then to lead a heart to the queen. East can win and play a second diamond. But declarer ruffs, cashes the spade king then plays a club to the queen, ruffs another diamond and now runs the clubs.

Dummy can discard its last diamond on the third club, and regardless of when East ruffs in, declarer will take 10 tricks.


You should not pass now. Yes, you have an uninspiring hand, but remember, you passed one club. Your partner won’t play you more than five points, and probably not for a long suit either. Once you limited your hand so violently at your first turn, you are well worth a call of two spades now, after partner invited you back to the party.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 8 7 5
 Q 7 4
 7 5 3 2
♣ Q 4
South West North East
    1♣ Pass
Pass 1 Dbl. 2
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.

Aldous Huxley


South North
East-West ♠ J 7 4
 8 6 4 2
 9 3 2
♣ A J 5
West East
♠ A 9 2
 9 5 3
 Q J 8 7 4
♣ Q 3
♠ 10 6 5 3
 K J 7
 K 6 5
♣ 9 8 7
South
♠ K Q 8
 A Q 10
 A 10
♣ K 10 6 4 2
South West North East
1♣ Pass 1 Pass
1 NT Pass 2♣ Pass
2 Pass 3 NT All pass

7

Knowing your opponents’ leading methods is often critical to finding the best line as declarer.

In today’s deal West leads the diamond seven against three no-trump, and as South you duck East’s diamond king and capture his six with your ace as West plays the eight. You have to find the best route to nine tricks.

Since your opponents play fourth-highest leads, the combination of West’s lead of the seven, plus East’s leading back the six, strongly suggests that West has five or more diamonds and has deviously concealed his small diamond. So if you knock out the spade ace the defenders will be in position to cash out the diamonds for down one. In other words, playing spades seems like a bad idea.

A different approach would be to find the club queen with West, as well as East holding both the heart king and jack. Not a good chance — in that you need three cards well placed for you, but it is not an entirely hopeless prospect. Yes you might expect the club queen to be to your right, but you do not have enough entries to dummy to take all the finesses you want against East.

So you play a club to the jack, and when it holds, next comes the crucial play of a heart to the 10. A second club finesse brings good news in that suit. Then, after a heart to the queen, all that remains is to claim nine tricks.


You could, I suppose, sell me on opening two no-trump, but this is not an especially attractive 19-count and bidding your long suit may get you to a more sensible partscore if your partner is weak. If he has enough to respond to one club you will surely be able to get to game as easily as if you had opened two no-trump.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K Q 8
 A Q 10
 A J
♣ K 10 6 4 2
South West North East
    Pass Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

Never do today what you can put off till tomorrow.

Punch magazine


South North
Neither ♠ 7 6 3
 A Q 3
 J 6 5
♣ K 9 8 6
West East
♠ 8 4
 6 5 2
 A K Q 3 2
♣ 4 3 2
♠ 5 2
 K J 7 4
 10 9 8 7 4
♣ 10 7
South
♠ A K Q J 10 9
 10 9 8
 —
♣ A Q J 5
South West North East
1♠ 2 3 4
6♠ All pass    

K

One of the plays that separates the expert from the intermediate player, is that while both of them take finesses when they must, somehow the expert’s finesses ether work more often – or good things happen when the finesse loses. Let’s see a deal that reflects that theme.

Consider the play in six spades in today’s deal, where East-West have competed in diamonds and West leads the diamond king. How would you set about catering for unfortunate lies of the cards?

After ruffing the first trick, declarer must draw trump in two rounds to avoid nasty accidents. At this point the stage is set for an elimination play, which requires two entries to dummy to ruff away the remaining diamonds from the North hand, to remove the defenders’ safe exit cards.

South starts with the club ace then queen. This brings the good news that the suit divides 3-2, and now declarer leads the club jack to dummy’s queen and ruffs a diamond. Dummy is reentered with the club nine and the diamond suit is finally eliminated with another ruff. Declarer now passes the heart 10 to East, who finds himself endplayed into leading a heart back into dummy’s tenace or conceding a ruff-and-discard. Either choice gives declarer 12 tricks.

Obviously, a heart at trick one breaks up this endplay. But note that if you do not make the effort to strip off the diamonds, East wins the first heart cheaply, exits in diamonds, and sits back to wait for his second heart winner.


Bid one no-trump now. You do not need a spade stopper for this auction but you do require a club stopper, and you have this to perfection. Remember your partner should have spades relatively under control because of his double, and your side has enough high cards to suggest the no-trump partscore.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 7 6 3
 A Q 3
 J 6 5
♣ K 9 8 6
South West North East
1♣ Dbl. 1♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, March 9th, 2015

The Government of the United States gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance.

George Washington


East North
Both ♠ 7 4 3
 K J 4
 A 9 7 6 3
♣ 10 4
West East
♠ 9 6 2
 10 9 7 2
 4 2
♣ Q 8 7 2
♠ K J 10 8 5
 A 6
 Q J 10 8
♣ 6 3
South
♠ A Q
 Q 8 5 3
 K 5
♣ A K J 9 5
South West North East
      1♠
Dbl. Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

♠2

One of the recurring themes in my articles is that the opposition bidding frequently leads declarer to the winning line. This was true today, but only in theory, not practice.

Against three no-trumps West led a low spade to the 10 and queen, and now with six top tricks, declarer hoped that a 3-3 heart break, might provide the other tricks he needed. If not, the clubs were favorite to come in for no loser.

A heart to the jack lost to the ace and back came a spade, removing declarer’s last stopper in that suit. When hearts proved to be 4-2, South entered dummy with the diamond ace and ran the club 10. It lost, and the spade return saw the speedy demise of the game.

In view of East’s opening bid, South was unlucky to find the club queen offside. But, unless East’s opening bid was an out and out psyche, declarer could have guaranteed his contract by entering dummy with the diamond ace at trick two, and leading the heart four. If East rises with the ace, declarer has three heart tricks, to bring the trick count up to the requisite nine.

And if East plays low, the queen will win, whereupon declarer can go after clubs. Four tricks are always available in this suit by playing low to the 10. (At pairs one might cash the ace and king, playing for an overtrick if the queen were singleton or doubleton, but this line does not cater for most 5-1 breaks.)


Your partner has done a good job of forcing the opponents up a level, and it looks simple enough to lead a spade. But I would, I think, lead the diamond ace to have a look at dummy, and gauge whether a better line of defense is necessary. The defense are surely never going to take a ruff here so leading the trump ace rates not to be costly.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ K 9 8 6
 7 6 3
 A Q 3
♣ J 6 5
South West North East
Pass 1
Pass 2 Dbl. Pass
2♠ Pass Pass 3
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, March 8th, 2015

Can you tell me about the forthcoming National tournament in New Orleans? Are there games that might be suitable for non-experts?

Archie and Veronica, Shreveport, La.

What a good question! Not only should there be games for complete beginners (there are classes to try to teach bridge in a day) but also for all levels of intermediate and advancing players. For more details check out the ACBL’s New Orlean’s tournament page here.

I held: ♠ 10-6-3-2,  Q-5,  K-10, ♣ A-9-7-4-2, and chose to respond one no-trump to my partner's opening bid of one heart, since I thought that my partner was unlikely to hold four spades. He passed and I made eight tricks in my contract. However, many others responded one spade instead of one no-trump, and found the 4-4 fit and scored better than we did. Was I correct in responding one no-trump or should I have opted for the major?

Rumblefish, Wausau, Wisc.

I would respond one spade if not playing Flannery – expecting that my partner could bid no-trump for himself if he wants. If he bids anything else than one no-trump, I won't feel any worse off. But I do understand your action as a passed hand (I'd be worried about partner passing, and playing one spade in a weak 4-3 fit).

One of the basic rules of defense is that as third hand one plays lowest from a sequence of honors when following suit. But as a defender when you have to split honors in second seat, do you split from the top or the bottom — or is there no general rule?

Albert Hall, Carmel, Calif.

Different people will produce different rules here. How about the following simple one? Play the lower card from the bottom of a sequence of two, and the higher card from a sequence of three. Note that any partnership agreement is far better than none!

The concept of a Mixed Raise has come up from time to time in your columns and in the ACBL magazine. What sequences does this bid apply in – and should I consider adding it to my convention card?

Juggernaut, Spokane, Wash.

The Mixed Raise lets you use a jump raise facing an overcall to be weak and distributional (say, fewer than seven points, with four trumps). When one hand overcalls, if his partner makes a jump cuebid in the opponent's suit, that shows 7-9 points, with four trumps: too much too pre-empt, but not enough for a limit raise. A Mixed Raise may also be used after your partner opens a major, and the next hand doubles. A jump in the other major can then be subverted to a Mixed Raise.

I held: ♠ 7,  K-9-5-3-2,  A-Q-9-2, ♣ K-Q-4 and opened one heart, and heard my partner raise to two hearts over my LHO's one spade overcall. My RHO competed to two spades. What would you do now?

Phillie Fanatic, Philadelphia, Pa.

With a singleton spade the odds strongly favor bidding. Since you do not have quite enough to make a game try, a simple call of three hearts seems to be enough. Change the heart two to the jack and I think you have just enough for a game try (plus lead director) of three diamonds.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, March 7th, 2015

Treat people with understanding when you can, and fake it when you can't until you do understand.

Kim Harrison


South North
Both ♠ 6 3 2
 A 9 7
 9 7 2
♣ A 7 5 2
West East
♠ K 9 7 4
 J 6
 J 5
♣ Q J 10 9 8
♠ Q J 5
 Q 8 4
 Q 10 8 4
♣ K 4 3
South
♠ A 10 8
 K 10 5 3 2
 A K 6 3
♣ 6
South West North East
1 Pass 2 Pass
3 Pass 4 All pass

♣Q

Against four hearts, in an expert game, West led the club queen, and South saw that if diamonds were three-three and hearts three-two, the route to a 10th trick would be straightforward enough. After playing ace, king and another diamond, he could duck a spade return and win the next spade. He would continue by cashing the ace and king of trumps then discarding dummy's last spade on the good diamond. Whether the defender with the good trump ruffed or not, South's last spade would be ruffed in dummy.

But declarer saw there was an additional chance when East had four diamonds too. If he could force an opponent to lead a trump, he might play the suit without the loss of a trick. For that to work, he had to remove the defenders’ exit cards. So, he ruffed a club at trick two, then played ace, king and a third diamond to East’s 10, while West discarded a spade. East returned the spade queen, and South ducked. After taking the spade 10 continuation with the ace, South led a fourth diamond, on which West correctly discarded a second spade.

Declarer ruffed the diamond in dummy, ruffed another club and exited with a spade. East won and did his best when he returned the heart queen but declarer took the trick with the ace and returned a heart to his king.

This was smart play by South, who reasoned that, with two small hearts, West might have ruffed in on the third spade to lead a heart.


Your partner has made a game-try, and you are certainly not minimum for the auction thus far. It is not so likely that no-trump has nine running tricks on a spade lead; but the diamond game might easily play much better than the club game (imagine partner with a strong hand and 1-3-4-5 pattern for example). Raise to four diamonds and let partner make the final decision.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q J 5
 Q 8 4
 Q 10 8 4
♣ K 4 3
South West North East
1♠ 2♣ 2♠
3♣ Pass 3 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2015. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

←Older