Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, March 11th, 2017

A passage broad, smooth, easy, inoffensive, down to Hell.

John Milton


S North
Both ♠ J 8 3 2
 Q 4 2
 5 4 2
♣ J 6 4
West East
♠ K 10 9 4
 J 8 3
 10
♣ A 10 9 8 3
♠ A 7 5
 K 9 7 5
 9 7 3
♣ 7 5 2
South
♠ Q 6
 A 10 6
 A K Q J 8 6
♣ K Q
South West North East
2 ♣ Pass 2 Pass
3 NT All pass    

♣10

In today’s deal South showed a strong hand plus a long minor when he jumped to three no-trump at his second turn. Playing Kokish relays, had he held a minimum balanced hand he would have rebid two no-trump. In this method, all other balanced game-forcing balanced hands start with an artificial two heart rebid at the second turn.

South had coped with the auction perfectly but he relaxed prematurely after the club 10 lead traveled round to his king. He exited with the club queen, and West won and rather desperately shifted to a low spade to his partner’s ace for a spade back. West captured the queen with the king and now ingeniously exited with the diamond 10. Declarer could have run the diamonds but he saw this would squeeze dummy. Instead, he stripped the diamonds and took his best shot in the hearts when he led up to the queen in dummy. East won this with the king, and returned a heart. Declarer put in the 10, losing to the jack, and that was down one.

The winning line for South is to cash three diamonds at once, then lead the club king. The defenders can take their club and spade winners as before, but West must then lead a heart for declarer. When South plays low from dummy, then even if East can put in the jack declarer can win and run all but one diamond to come down to two black winners in dummy and the bare heart queen. Then he exits in hearts, and take two of the last three tricks.


Is your hand worth a slam try? I say it is, and in order to make that try you have two choices. The first is to bid four hearts, an artificial call (it cannot be natural since you did not transfer into hearts) setting spades and showing slam interest. The second route is to jump to five diamonds, showing short diamonds and spade fit. I prefer the second choice.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 10 9 4
 J 8 3
 10
♣ A 10 9 8 3
South West North East
    2 NT Pass
3 ♣ Pass 3 ♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, March 10th, 2017

I would rather be able to appreciate things I cannot have than to have things I am not able to appreciate.

Elbert Hubbard


S North
N-S ♠ 8 3
 A J
 J 10 8 5
♣ Q J 10 9 3
West East
♠ J 9 4
 8 6 4 2
 A 6 3
♣ A 8 4
♠ Q 10 7 2
 K 10 7 3
 9 4 2
♣ 7 5
South
♠ A K 6 5
 Q 9 5
 K Q 7
♣ K 6 2
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
       

6

Not all nine counts are created equal. Facing a strong no-trump, North has a chunky five-card suit. He knows that his partnership is close to the game zone, and the long suit may well provide South with enough material for the nine-trick game to have play. So he should simply bid three no-trump instead of merely inviting it with a bid of two no-trump.

After a heart lead, not only does the heart finesse lose but the heart ace is knocked out of the dummy before South has had time to establish the clubs. Nonetheless it looks logical for South to go after the clubs, but look what happens when South leads out the club king and another club. West will duck both the first and the second club but will take the third club if South plays it. Similarly West will likewise refuse the king and diamond queen, but should take South’s low diamond at his first opportunity, to block the suit. Then he can clear the hearts, and South will end up making only two clubs and two diamonds. Coupled with two tricks in each major, that comes to just eight tricks for declarer.

By contrast, if South goes after diamonds early, he can make sure of reaching dummy for the third diamond trick, because he has a sure entry to the board in clubs. The defenders can take two hearts and two aces, but declarer can come to three diamonds and two tricks in each of the other suits, for nine tricks in total.


When you have a weak hand and four spades, you want to boost the auction to the three level as quickly as possible, so bid three spades right now. Yes, you don’t expect the opponents to bid four hearts, but you will certainly not object if they do – and they might well have a minor-suit fit that you have just made it far more dangerous for them to find.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ Q 10 7 2
 K 10 7 3
 9 4 2
♣ 7 5
South West North East
  Pass 1 ♠ Dbl.
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, March 9th, 2017

For man is man and master of his fate.

Alfred, Lord Tennyson


N North
None ♠ J 10
 A 9 3
 A 10 4
♣ K J 8 6 3
West East
♠ K 4 3
 Q 6 4
 J 7 6 2
♣ 7 5 2
♠ 7 5 2
 J 2
 K 8 5 3
♣ A Q 10 9
South
♠ A Q 9 8 6
 K 10 8 7 5
 Q 9
♣ 4
South West North East
    1 ♣ Pass
1 ♠ Pass 1 NT Pass
3 Pass 3 ♠ Pass
4 All pass    

2

In today’s deal East was a relative novice, but one who had already indicated that he had a decent nose for the game. Against four hearts, West had no reason to find the killing club lead. Instead he led the diamond two, and declarer played low from dummy. When East won his king, there followed a long pause. Eventually South asked East if he knew whose lead it was, but East was not to be goaded into coming to a premature decision. Finally the club ace hit the deck, somewhat to West’s surprise. However, as the play advanced he realized that his partner had found the only defense to beat the contract.

To South’s credit, when he found that he had an inescapable loser in each major, he congratulated his RHO and asked how he had found the killing defense. As East explained, South was marked from the auction with at least 10 cards in the majors. That left room for just three minor suit cards.

When West led the diamond two, this could in theory have been from three or four cards to one honor but not to a holding including both the queen and jack. If the lead was from a three-card suit, then South would have been void in clubs, but could not have a diamond loser. Therefore even if the club ace was ruffed away, it could not matter.

However if South held a singleton club with either the doubleton diamond jack or queen, then declarer’s club loser could be disposed of on dummy’s diamond winner.


While there are hands where your side can make game, or find it to be dependent on a finesse or break, this is distinctly against the odds. If I had the heart queen or jack in addition, I would feel differently, but I’d need distinctly better hearts or spades to make a try for game. So I would pass now.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 9 8 6
 K 10 8 7 5
 Q 9
♣ 4
South West North East
1 ♠ Pass 2 ♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

And when a lady’s in the case You know all other things give place.

John Gay


S North
Both ♠ J 8 3
 A 8 6 5 4
 8 5 3
♣ K 3
West East
♠ K 9 7 6 5
 K 2
 Q 7 6
♣ 10 7 4
♠ Q 10
 Q 10 9 7 3
 K 2
♣ J 6 5 2
South
♠ A 4 2
 J
 A J 10 9 4
♣ A Q 9 8
South West North East
1 Pass 1 Pass
2 ♣ Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
       

♠6

Goldilocks was well into spring-cleaning the bears’ cabin when she heard them return from their weekly foray to the bridge club. Today Papa Bear’s roaring could be heard as he came into the driveway. This was the board that upset him. His partner had declared three no-trump on a low spade lead.

“Can you believe the idiot put up the jack? He ducked the first and second spades, but West overtook, and cleared spades, with a sure diamond entry to shoot down the contract.”

Mama Bear felt she had done better. “I ducked the first spade in dummy, and when the 10 came up I played low from hand. I was hoping East had K-10 doubleton when the suit would be blocked. But as it was, West could overtake the queen when I ducked again, and now I was dead meat.”

Since Baby Bear was giving signs of being about to explode, Goldilocks decided to relieve the tension and ask him what had happened at his table.

“I played low from dummy and won with the ace,” he said. “This would block the suit whenever East has the doubleton king or queen of spades. I could then cross to the club king and play a diamond to the jack. Later I could use the heart ace entry for running the diamond eight. That would allow me to pick up any 4-1 diamond break.”

Since West might have overcalled with king-queen-fifth of spades and something in the red suits, this seemed best all round. And it worked.


You would have been close to jumping to two hearts had East not responded to his partner’s opening bid, but as it is, unless one of your opponents has dramatically misled you about his values, your side’s combined assets do not add up to the game zone. I would bid two hearts, planning to compete to three hearts over a call of three diamonds by one of my opponents.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ J 8 3
 A 8 6 5 4
 8 5 3
♣ K 3
South West North East
  1 Dbl. 1 ♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, March 7th, 2017

The more time you spend contemplating what you should have done… you lose valuable time planning what you can and will do.

Lil Wayne


W North
E-W ♠ 6 3
 8 6
 A 9 5 3
♣ A 9 8 5 4
West East
♠ Q 9 8
 K Q J 10 9 2
 J 2
♣ 10 7
♠ J 10 5 2
 5
 Q 10 8 7
♣ J 6 3 2
South
♠ A K 7 4
 A 7 4 3
 K 6 4
♣ K Q
South West North East
  2 Pass Pass
Dbl. Pass 3 ♣ * Pass
3 NT All pass    

*promising values

K

In today’s deal, both tables in a team game reached three no-trump after West had preempted at unfavorable vulnerability. In one case South closed his eyes and jumped to three no-trump at his first turn, in the other case when North showed some values with a constructive call of three clubs, South converted to three no-trump. (Had North been weaker he could have used an extension of the Lebensohl convention by bidding two no-trump as a puppet to three clubs.)

The declarer who had followed the direct route in the auction won the first heart lead, unblocked clubs, then crossed to the diamond ace to try to run clubs. When that line failed, so did his contract.

In the other room South thoughtfully ducked the first two hearts as West led out the heart king, queen then jack, suggesting suit preference for spades. South pitched a spade from dummy on the third heart. Meanwhile, East did the best he could for his side by also discarding spades.

Declarer then advanced the club queen, followed by the club king. When West followed on the second round with the 10 declarer decided that since West had six hearts and East one, clubs were far more likely to be 4-2 initially than 3-3. Additionally the fall of the 10 surely rated to be from a doubleton rather than J-10-7. So he overtook the club king with the ace and led out the nine, losing the trick to East, but setting up his ninth top winner in the process.


You have enough values to drive to game, but should it be the 5-3 (or 5-4) club fit or the 5-2 spade fit? I suggest you temporize with a call of three diamonds, planning to raise spades, or play clubs if partner rebids the suit. And if partner makes the unlikely rebid of three no-trump, you should probably pass.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 6 3
 8 6
 A 7 5 3
♣ A 9 8 5 4
South West North East
    1 ♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
2 ♠ Pass 3 ♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, March 6th, 2017

I can see clearly now the rain is gone, I can see all obstacles in my way.

Jimmy Cliff


N North
Both ♠ A Q 4
 K J 5
 A Q 6
♣ K 9 6 2
West East
♠ J 7
 9 8 7 6 2
 7 4
♣ Q 10 7 3
♠ 10 9 8 5 3
 Q 4
 J 9 5 3
♣ J 8
South
♠ K 6 2
 A 10 3
 K 10 8 2
♣ A 5 4
South West North East
    1 ♣ Pass
3 NT Pass 4 NT Pass
6 NT All pass    

9

In today’s hand South’s hand is best described by an immediate jump to three no-trump, suggesting a balanced game-force with a balanced 13-15 points. When North moves on, he is suggesting a balanced 18-19 count. South would be prepared to offer clubs as a trump suit if he had four but not here, and his controls suggest moving directly to the no-trump slam.

The defenders make the natural, but helpful, heart lead. However, despite being gifted the solution to locating the heart queen, the contract is by no means cold. How should declarer play the hand to best advantage?

Good technique here is to win the opening lead in hand and lay down the club ace, just in case East has a singleton honor, then lead a club, planning to duck an honor from West or to cover a small card. By giving up your loser at once, it makes the rest of the hand much easier to play.

You can now win the heart return and cash the third heart, then all the spades. You next test clubs and find out who began with the club length. In the process of delaying the diamond guess, you get a very full picture of the major suit distributions, since one defender or the other will show out in each suit.

Here, you will find West has five hearts, precisely two spades, and can be counted for four clubs. So cash the diamond ace and queen, and in the two-card ending, finesse against the jack with confidence.


When deciding between an active and passive lead you should ask yourself if you think your cards lie well or badly for the opponents, and if they sound like they are stretching. Here there is no suggestion that the opponents are especially limited, and spades and diamonds do not appear to be lying so badly. All of that suggests going active on lead, with a small heart not a club.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ J 10 4
 K 9 3
 Q 4
♣ J 8 6 3 2
South West North East
  1 Pass 1 ♠
Pass 3 ♠ Pass 4 ♠
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, March 5th, 2017

I had been thinking of going to the spring nationals next week, since they are on my doorstep. Will there be events suitable for non-experts?

Playing Up, Kansas City, Mo.

The Nationals run from 8-19th March, and on every day at 10 a.m. they have separate games for newcomers and intermediate players, with separate sections in regional games for rather more advanced nonexperts. There are also days with free lessons. The ACBL will provide you with more details, at 901-332-5586. And the ACBL bulletin has all the details.

When I first learned to play, 40 years ago, I was taught that a double over a pre-emptive opening or overcall was for penalty. Has that changed, and, if so, why?

Forcing the Issue, Orlando, Fla.

The double of a preempt is nowadays universally played as take-out, both over and under the trumps. This is not because you won’t want to double for penalty occasionally, but because you are more likely to be short not long in their suit. Reserve the double for a common, not uncommon, occasion. After they open, negative doubles are now more common than penalty doubles, for the same reason. Rest assured, a thoughtful partner will try to re-open with a take-out double when short in their suit.

What are the factors to consider in making a light response to partner’s opening bid, when you are simply trying to improve the contract? How do position and vulnerability factor into the equation?

Staying Alive, San Luis Obispo, Calif.

If your partner opens a minor in first or second seat, you will often strive to improve the contract when short in that suit and holding 3-5 points, whatever the colors. That happens less often facing a major-suit opening, I find. Note that when facing a third or fourth in hand opening bid, you do not need to worry about silencing the opponents. They would generally have bid by now if it was their hand.

Holding ♠ A-Q-J-9-8-2, —, Q-2, ♣ Q-10-9-5-3, you open the bidding with one spade, of course. When your partner responds with the Jacoby two no-trump showing a game-forcing hand with spade support, what should you show first, your second suit or your shortness?

Show and Tell, Elkhart, Ind.

A jump to four clubs would show a second suit but it ought to be one headed by two top honors. So I suggest you show your shortage initially, with a call of three hearts, and now if you rebid hearts that would show either a singleton ace, or a void.

Not vulnerable against vulnerable, would you risk intervening at the two-level with a pre-emptive overcall on a hand such as: ♠ Q-4, K-J-7-6-5-2, Q-8-5, ♣ 10-4 when your RHO opens one club? What are the factors that influence your decision here?

Raise the Roof, Great Falls, Mont.

It is always more fun to bid than to pass. Your suit is good enough to bid on when nonvulnerable; and you might well find that if you end up on defense you will score your queens, because declarer figures you are short in the side suits! With the heart 10 instead of the two, I’d expect almost every expert would act, and most would bid with your actual hand, albeit with a few misgivings.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, March 4th, 2017

I’m forever blowing bubbles, pretty bubbles in the air.

Kendis, Brockman and Vincent


S North
None ♠ A 10 7 5
 J 7 3 2
 8
♣ K J 9 5
West East
♠ K Q 9 8 6
 Q 10
 9 7 6 3
♣ 4 2
♠ 4 3 2
 8 6 5
 K Q 10 4
♣ 10 8 7
South
♠ J
 A K 9 4
 A J 5 2
♣ A Q 6 3
South West North East
1 ♣ 1 ♠ Dbl. Pass
3 Pass 4 ♣ Pass
4 Pass 4 Pass
4 ♠ Pass 6 All pass
       

♠K

In baseball a hitter is regarded as a huge success if he only fails seven times in 10. I occasionally have had to wonder if my own success rate hovers around the same average.

This hand comes from the Macallan tournament two decades ago. At one table Alfredo Versace declared an apparently awkward six heart slam here on the auction shown. After the lead of a top spade, Versace ruffed three diamonds in dummy, using a trump, club and spade ruff to reenter his hand. When he laid down the top trumps he ended up with all 13 tricks.

By contrast, I declared six clubs, which looks easier to make, but I had received an enterprising pre-emptive jump overcall in spades from Lars Blakset with the West hand.

After a top spade lead I set about the same cross-ruff, ruffing three diamonds in dummy, using a top heart and a spade ruff as reentries to hand. When the heart 10 fell I now thought I knew East, Jens Auken, had begun life with precisely 2=4=4=3 pattern. So I led dummy’s high trump and overtook it (setting up East’s 10) and played two more rounds of trump to leave East on lead.

If he had three hearts left, as did both dummy and declarer, he would be endplayed to lead a heart round to the jack, and I could finesse the heart nine on the way back, for a very elegant 12 tricks.

But Auken produced an impossible spade, down went the contract, and my chance of a brilliancy prize went up in smoke.


Your partner’s two diamond call suggests real extras, but is consistent with say a 17-19 count with no diamond stopper and only three spades. Regardless, you have a straightforward jump to four spades, suggesting five spades and extras. If your partner actually has a game-forcing hand with a club or heart suit he will bid it next – and you will probably raise to slam.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K Q 9 8 6
 Q 10
 9 7 6 3
♣ 4 2
South West North East
  1 Dbl. Pass
1 ♠ Pass 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, March 3rd, 2017

Insight is not a lightbulb that goes off inside our heads. It is a flickering candle that can easily be snuffed out.

Malcolm Gladwell


W North
None ♠ A K 2
 A Q
 A Q 7 5 4
♣ 8 6 3
West East
♠ 7
 K J 10 9 3
 K J 9 3
♣ K Q J
♠ 8 6 4
 8 7 6 4 2
 10
♣ A 10 9 5
South
♠ Q J 10 9 5 3
 5
 8 6 2
♣ 7 4 2
South West North East
  1 Dbl. 3
3 ♠ 4 Dbl. Pass
4 ♠ All pass    

♣K

Today’s deal saw South compete to three spades at his first turn by virtue of his nice shape. When his partner doubled four hearts to show extra values it was relatively clear because of his lack of defense to remove to four spades.

At the table the defenders led the club king, and continued with the queen, then jack, overtaken by East for a trump shift. What happened at the table was that declarer won in dummy and ran six rounds of trumps, on which West carefully discarded four hearts, baring his heart king, then finally a diamond, trying to simulate a man who was being forced to unguard diamonds. At this point declarer had to make a pitch from dummy with the ace-queen of hearts and ace-queen-third of diamonds left. He got it wrong when he discarded the heart queen, playing for the diamonds to run, and now had to go down.

Declarer would have done better with a slightly counter-intuitive strategy here. He should win the spade ace and does best first to cash the heart ace, then run all the trumps.

For this line to succeed, all declarer requires is for West to hold the heart king, and at least three diamonds to the king. By cashing the heart ace early, it saves you any guess as to which cards West has kept. If the heart king is not discarded, you will know to pitch the heart queen from dummy at trick 10, and hope that the diamonds will be running.


Jump to two no-trump showing your range as 18-19 high card points. You should not worry about the absence of a club stopper, since you have three cards in that suit. For the record, if you had a doubleton club and three hearts you might consider inventing a force of two spades, planning to raise hearts at the next turn, I suppose.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A K 2
 A Q
 A Q 7 5 4
♣ 8 6 3
South West North East
1 Pass 1 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

I do not know which makes a man more conservative – to know nothing but the present, or nothing but the past.

John Maynard Keynes


S North
None ♠ 10 4
 K J 6 2
 K 8 5
♣ K 7 5 3
West East
♠ K Q 9 6 5 3 2
 9 5
 10 7 4
♣ 8
♠ J 8 7
 4
 A J 9 6 3
♣ Q 10 6 4
South
♠ A
 A Q 10 8 7 3
 Q 2
♣ A J 9 2
South West North East
1 3 ♠ 4 4 ♠
5 ♣ Pass 5 Pass
6 All pass    

♠K

When South opens one heart, West does his best to disrupt his opponents by pre-empting to the three level. It now looks natural for East to sacrifice in four spades over four hearts, but had he passed, might it have ended the auction?

As it is, South seems to have enough to compete over four spades to the five level, and maybe even to look for slam. The five club call lets North show some suitability and a diamond control, with a return cuebid of five diamonds, and that should be just enough for South to bite the bullet and bid slam.

In six hearts, after a top spade lead, you simply need to avoid losing a club, and must leave playing the suit as long as possible. Win the spade lead, draw trump by cashing the ace and leading the eight to the king, then play a diamond toward your queen. When East ducks, you win your queen and duck a diamond. East wins and returns a spade. You ruff high, lead the heart seven to the jack, and ruff a diamond high, as West follows suit again.

At this point you should count out West’s hand. He apparently started with seven spades, three or more diamonds, and two hearts, so he does not have room for more than one club.

So the winning play is clear: lead a club to the king, then follow up with a club to the nine. Next cross back to dummy with your trump three to the four, to lead a club to the jack.


Whatever your agreement in a non-competitive auction about how to continue after your partner reverses, showing real extras with both minors, competitive auctions present a different problem. A reversion to three clubs or three diamonds should not be forcing now. It is better to start with a cuebid of two spades, to set up a forcing sequence.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 4
 K J 3 2
 K 8 5
♣ K 7 5 3
South West North East
    1 ♣ Pass
1 1 ♠ 2 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog.
Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2017. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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