Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, October 10th, 2014

I went to a bookstore and asked the saleswoman where the self-help section was. She said if she told me, it would defeat the purpose.

George Carlin


West North
Both ♠ 4 3 2
 K Q 7 5
 J 8 2
♣ Q 6 4
West East
♠ —
 10 8 2
 K Q 10 9 7 6 5
♣ 10 7 2
♠ 8 6
 J 9 6 4 3
 3
♣ K J 9 5 3
South
♠ A K Q J 10 9 7 5
 A
 A 4
♣ A 8
South West North East
3 Pass Pass
6♠ All pass    

K

The hallmark of a well-constructed problem is that it resembles the sort of deal you face in real life. If you were to look at today's deal and remark with raised eyebrows, that the blockage in the heart suit and the lack of entries to dummy in the trump suit seem rather artificial, I would be hard-pressed to argue with you. But that is not the point. Having reached six spades, and having found dummy with a tantalizing collection of goodies that appear to be just out of reach, how are you going to make best use of its assets?

Let’s assume you win the diamond lead and play the trump ace, West showing out and discarding a diamond. If West holds the club king, you can draw the last trump, cash the heart ace, and play a diamond, forcing West to give you an entry to dummy with a club, heart, or diamond.

However, East is surely the favorite to hold the club king because of the theory of Vacant Spaces, which tells you that West has six cards outside of diamonds and spades, while East has 10 such spaces.

If you believe, as I do, that West would be equally likely to open a three-diamond pre-empt with or without the club king, then the way home from here is to cash the heart ace and exit with the trump five. As the cards lie, East is forced to bring dummy back to life and allow you to make 12 tricks.


Your partner has shown six diamonds and five spades and not a huge hand. (He could have bid two spades at his second turn or jumped to three spades over one no-trump.) My best guess would be to let sleeping dogs lie and pass two spades. Correcting to three diamonds might improve the contract — but you really do not want to hear partner bid again!

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 6
 J 9 6 4 3
 3
♣ K J 9 5 3
South West North East
Pass 1 Pass
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
1 NT Pass 2♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, October 9th, 2014

The last thing one knows in constructing a work is what to put first.

Blaise Pascal


South North
Both ♠ A K J 9
 8 5
 7 2
♣ J 9 7 6 2
West East
♠ 10 6 5 3
 9 2
 Q 10 6 4
♣ 10 4 3
♠ Q 8 2
 K Q 7 3
 9 8 3
♣ A Q 5
South
♠ 7 4
 A J 10 6 4
 A K J 5
♣ K 8
South West North East
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
2 Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

4

At one table in a team game West elected to lead a low diamond against three no-trump. East's eight forced the jack, and declarer now guessed to play on spades by leading low to the nine. East won the trick to return a diamond, and declarer took the trick, then ran off the spades while discarding a diamond and a heart from hand as East pitched a club. When he led a heart from dummy toward his hand, East ducked. Declarer took his heart jack and ace and his diamond winner, and East was then thrown in with a heart to give declarer his ninth trick in clubs.

Since no lead appeared to give the defenders a sure set, East was philosophical about the whole thing. However, when they came to score up, his teammates announced ‘Lose 13 IMPs’.

When East wondered whether the swing had been the result of a superior choice of opening lead, South confirmed that West had led a fourth highest spade three. South had put in the nine -and East had ducked! Declarer led a heart to his jack, then played ace and another heart, and East won his queen to shift to the diamond nine. South went up with the ace, cleared the hearts, then took the next diamond with the king and cashed his long heart. East nonchalantly discarded his small spade, so can you really blame declarer for playing a spade to the jack now?

East won his queen, and played yet another diamond, and the defenders had six tricks.


The jump to four clubs suggests a very strong hand with spade fit and a singleton club. It looks natural to bid four spades — but just think how much better your trumps are than they might be. With nothing to cue-bid, maybe the best way to get the nature of your hand across is by jumping to five spades. Such jumps typically either show really bad trumps, or as here, very good trumps but nothing else to show.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A K J 9
 8 5
 7 2
♣ J 9 7 6 2
South West North East
Pass 1 Pass
1♠ Pass 4♣ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful.

Friedrich Nietzsche


West North
East-West ♠ A 9 7 5
 Q 8 4 2
 A K 10 5
♣ 7
West East
♠ Q J 6
 J 10
 J 8 3
♣ A K J 9 4
♠ K 10 3 2
 K 9 3
 Q 9 4
♣ 8 3 2
South
♠ 8 4
 A 7 6 5
 7 6 2
♣ Q 10 6 5
South West North East
1♣ Dbl. 1 NT
2 Pass 3 All pass

♣K

In this deal from a recent Gold Coast tournament in Australia, declarer observed that the opposnents do not always defend correctly; but it is up to you to make them pay. Michael Prescott was South, on an auction in which he sensibly came in over one no-trump, assuming that either he or his opponents would be very close to making their contract. In general one wants to respond to a takeout double if one can.

Equally, North should not have invited game by raising two hearts to three, thus risking giving up the plus score. One might compete to three hearts over three clubs, but a very different sort of calculation would be involved.

Against Prescott’s delicate contract, West led a top club and shifted to a top spade instead of playing a heart. Prescott ducked, won the next spade to ruff a spade, then trumped a club in dummy. Next, he played the fourth spade and pitched a diamond from hand, at which point West gave declarer his chance when he discarded a club rather than a diamond. East exited with a third club, and Prescott ruffed in dummy, then played the top diamonds and ruffed a diamond.

By now Prescott was fairly sure that West, who had a balanced hand, would have opened a strong no-trump with the heart king. So he led his last club and pitched dummy’s diamond when West produced the king. Success! East was forced to ruff his partner’s winner, then lead away from the heart king. Contract made.


With a dead minimum and only four hearts, it looks normal enough to pass your partner's invitational call of three hearts. But if your partner has both clubs and hearts, as you would expect — since the only other hand-type he might have is a balanced 18-count — maybe your fitting cards in clubs make you just worth a raise to game.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 4
 A 7 6 5
 7 6 2
♣ Q 10 6 5
South West North East
1♣ Pass
1 Pass 3 Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

Calvin: I’m a misunderstood genius.
Hobbes: What’s misunderstood?
Calvin: Nobody thinks I’m a genius.

Bill Watterson


South North
East-West ♠ —
 K Q 9 8 6 3
 9 5
♣ A 10 8 7 3
West East
♠ 7
 A 5
 A K 8 7 6 4 3 2
♣ Q 5
♠ 8 6 3 2
 J 10 7
 Q J
♣ K J 4 2
South
♠ A K Q J 10 9 5 4
 4 2
 10
♣ 9 6
South West North East
4♠ 5 Pass Pass
5♠ Pass Pass Dbl.
All pass      

K

The line between looking foolish and being a genius is a fine one. Today’s deal comes from the Spring Foursomes, where South decided to take what she knew would be a relatively cheap sacrifice. Fortunately for her, North’s values turned out to be extremely useful. West led a top diamond, on which East played the queen. Now what should West do? switch to a club? or try to cash a second top diamond?

Influenced no doubt by East’s double, West decided his partner had a singleton and played a second top diamond. Declarer ruffed, drew trump, then played a heart to dummy’s king, followed by a second heart. When West’s ace came tumbling down, she had a parking place for her club loser. Yes, maybe it would have been right for West to shift to the club queen at trick two — since unless declarer had both the king and jack of clubs, this would probably not let the contract through.

In the other room North did double five diamonds, and led a top heart. Now, although five diamonds by West appears to have three losers, the fact that North was void in spades meant there was plenty of time for declarer to establish a club or heart trick for a spade discard. Even if South had gone down in five spades doubled, she would still have gained a bushel of IMPs. As it was, our featured North-South pair had a double game-swing.


You may not agree with the opening call of two hearts; but as long as the heart suit is good and you have a side-suit, you won't be at a disadvantage. The question is how to show the hand now. The answer is to jump to four clubs, which suggests this pattern and lets your partner go wherever he wants.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ —
 K Q 9 8 6 3
 9 5
♣ A 10 8 7 3
South West North East
2 Pass 2 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, October 6th, 2014

We should look long and carefully at ourselves before we pass judgment on others.

Moliere


West North
North-South ♠ A K
 A J 6 4
 K 10 2
♣ J 8 3 2
West East
♠ J 2
 K Q 9
 Q J 8 7 4
♣ A Q 10
♠ 10 9 8 7 3
 7 3 2
 5 3
♣ 9 7 4
South
♠ Q 6 5 4
 10 8 5
 A 9 6
♣ K 6 5
South West North East
1 NT Dbl. 2♠
3 NT All pass    

Q

On the lead of the diamond queen against three no-trump, South correctly assumed this would assure his side of three tricks in the suit. A moment's less euphoria and a little more thought would have brought his contact home.

But without giving the matter enough thought, South made the play that most of us would have made when he won West’s lead of the diamond queen with the ace, removing his only sure entry to his hand.

He continued with a low heart from hand, West playing the queen, and dummy’s ace winning. Next, declarer unblocked the spade ace and king and followed with the heart jack from dummy, hoping to create an entry to his hand with the 10 — but West thoughtfully held off. Declarer played another heart, and West won and exited with a diamond. South duly made three diamond tricks, but now there was no way to reach the spade queen, and the defense ended with two clubs, two diamonds and a heart trick.

As West was known to hold all the high cards, South should have won the opening lead with dummy’s diamond king, cashed the two top spades, then led a low heart to the 10. If West ducks this, declarer can now cash the spade queen, then continue playing on hearts. Should West take the heart, he can do no better than exit with one. Now declarer takes the heart winners, pitching a spade from hand, and runs the club jack, forcing West to give declarer a trick and an entry.


While a case could be made for a club lead, in a sense the only person who has bid clubs is East. North's one club didn't really show clubs here, so I would be tempted to lead the spade nine, on the grounds that this is the suit least likely to cost a trick.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ 9 8 6 4
 Q 10 2
 J 3 2
♣ Q 7 3
South West North East
Pass Pass 1♣ 1 NT
Pass 2 Pass 2
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, October 5th, 2014

What sort of values would you associate with the advance to one no-trump facing an overcall? Specifically, with: ♠ A-5-3-2,  A-Q-9-8-5,  K-2, ♣ J-4, would you overcall one heart over one club or would you double? And if you overcall and your partner responds one no-trump, what should you do next?

Entry-Level, Pueblo, Colo.

I don't hate doubling one club, but I would overcall and hope to find a way back into spades if appropriate. Your partner's one-no-trump call could be anywhere in the 7-11 range. I would guess to pass now, but if I could bid a second suit economically, I would do that.

Say you hold decent values and three-card support for your partner, the opening bidder, after a double to your right. Should I redouble, or to make some other call? With: ♠ 7-6-2,  A-6,  A-9-8-4-2, ♣ K-9-3, what is your best call after your partner opens one spade, and your RHO doubles? Do you raise partner, bid your suit, or redouble to show strength?

Call Waiting, Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

Without the double I'd go through the forcing no-trump (if I had it available) to show a limit raise, rather than force to game. My bad trumps mean I should pull in a notch here. Over a double, redouble shows 10 or more, tending to deny spade support. So I would redouble, then raise spades — indirectly suggesting good values but bad trumps.

What is the difference between an Eastern and a Western Cue-bid? Are both methods still in common usage — and are these still the common names for these calls?

Bicoastal, Worcester, Mass.

Before I answer, I remember the days when cue-bids below three no-trump showed a control in the opponent's suit and a slam-going hand! These days, most cheap cue-bids are attempts to reach three no-trump. Western Cue-bids are attempts to get to no-trump by asking partner for a stopper or half-stopper in the opponent's suit. Eastern Cue-bids are less popular in that they actually suggest a stopper.

My partner and I play weak-twos and are wondering whether we should play a convention recommended to us called McCabe, after the opponents double or overcall our bid?

Gas Fitter, Saint John's, Newfoundland

After a double of a weak-two, but not after an overcall — since you now rate to be on lead — one can play a redouble as strong, with raises natural and pre-emptive. New suits are natural and to play at the two-level, but lead-directing at the three-level, guaranteeing at least a partial fit, while jumps show decent suits together with a real fit for partner. To bail out into your own suit, bid two no-trump to puppet three clubs from your partner. Then you can name the final contract or show a high-card raise in your partner's suit.

I would like our partnership to have a simple rule to the effect that all doubles of our opponents' artificial trump raises (such as Drury or Bergen) request the lead of that suit. But is it ever better to play such doubles as takeout of the opponent's known suit?

Whacked Out, Charleston, S.C.

You should double an artificial no-trump response for takeout of the bid suit, but the blanket rule for all other sequences might well be to use value-showing doubles as lead-directing. The only exception might be to use the double of an artificial call that shows a raise with less than limit values as takeout of the agreed suit.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, October 4th, 2014

Fortune is like the market, where many times, if you can stay a little, the price will fall.

Francis Bacon


North North
East-West ♠ K J
 K J 6 4
 10 9 8 6
♣ K Q J
West East
♠ 8 6 5 3 2
 10 9 8 2
 Q 3
♣ A 7
♠ —
 A Q 7 5 3
 K J 7 4
♣ 8 6 4 2
South
♠ A Q 10 9 7 4
 —
 A 5 2
♣ 10 9 5 3
South West North East
1 1
1♠ 2 Pass Pass
4♠ Dbl. All pass  

10

At the table South would doubtless have taken the simple but unsuccessful line in four hearts of covering the heart 10 with the jack, then playing on trumps, but West's double alerted him to the danger of bad breaks. He played low from dummy at the first trick and ruffed the lead in hand with the spade four.

When he played the spade seven to the king, he received the bad if not entirely unexpected news. He shifted his attention to clubs now, and had West ducked, declarer would have reverted to drawing all the trumps, (unblocking dummy’s clubs if East lets a club go) and would then have gone back to clubs.

West actually won the club ace and played the heart eight through dummy. Thanks to South’s play to the first trick, he was still in control. He put up the jack from dummy, and when East played the queen, declarer discarded a diamond loser.

He could win the diamond return with the ace, cash a club (preserving the club 10-9 in hand), then run the trumps, discarding dummy’s remaining club honor on one of the trump winners, and conceding trick 13 to the opponents.

It looks like the natural play, but if declarer puts up the heart jack at trick one, then the defense can succeed — since whatever declarer does, West can play hearts through him sufficiently often to force him twice in hearts.


Please do not double one club here. With only two spades, your hand is totally unsuitable for that action. Since an overcall of one no-trump would be a wild overbid, pass and hope to find a way to come back into the auction. Just remember that you are never obligated to overcall just because you have opening values – and that overcalling with a weak four-card suit may lead to tears before bedtime.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K J
 K J 6 4
 10 9 8 6
♣ K Q J
South West North East
1♣
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The chief danger in life is that you may take too many precautions.

Alfred Adler


East North
Neither ♠ A 8 3 2
 A K Q 4 2
 K 2
♣ 4 3
West East
♠ J 10 7 4
 10 7 6
 J 9 6 3
♣ J 10
♠ 9
 5
 Q 7 5 4
♣ K Q 9 8 7 5 2
South
♠ K Q 6 5
 J 9 8 3
 A 10 8
♣ A 6
South West North East
3♣
Dbl. Pass 4♣ Pass
4 Pass 5 Pass
6 All pass    

♣J

In today's deal what precisely does the raise to five of a major ask for? Most commonly, as here, it asks for the control in a specific suit — one either bid by the opponents or not cue-bid by either player, while all other suits have been cue-bid.

The second meaning is for it to raise a red flag about trump quality, a less common but parallel variation being that you have good trump but nothing to cue-bid. And least common of all, typically in a contested auction, is to use the call to show otherwise unbiddable extras.

In today’s sequence North cannot have a club control (he would have cue-bid five clubs or used Blackwood) so he is demanding that his partner bid slam with a first-round club control. With the same hand and an extra king, South would try six clubs or cue-bid in another suit.

When West leads a club against six hearts, South can see that the matching distributions leave him in danger of losing one trick in each black suit if spades do not break, but he can protect himself against anything but a small singleton in East.

Declarer takes the club lead in hand and draws trumps. Then he carefully cashes just the spade king, noting the fall of the nine. He eliminates the diamonds by ruffing the third round in dummy, and exits with a club. If East wins this, he will be endplayed; if West wins, he must lead a spade and give up his potential spade winner.


When your partner produces either a forcing or nonforcing no-trump response, you aren't good enough to force to game, but equally are too good not to make a try for game. Since partner won't hold spades and already knows you have five hearts, the least misdescriptive action is to raise to two no-trump. This is an invitational call, which you are just about worth because of your good suit.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 8 3 2
 A K Q 4 2
 K 2
♣ 4 3
South West North East
1 Pass 1 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

It is better to be a fool than to be dead.

Robert Louis Stevenson


South North
East-West ♠ A 6 4
 8 6 2
 Q 10 7 4 2
♣ 8 3
West East
♠ 5
 K Q J 10 4
 K 8 6 3
♣ K J 7
♠ J 10 9
 9 7 5 3
 9 5
♣ 10 9 6 5
South
♠ K Q 8 7 3 2
 A
 A J
♣ A Q 4 2
South West North East
1♠ 2 2♠ Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
6♠ All pass    

K

South had to back up his exuberance in the auction with some fine play, and he proved himself equal to the task today.

Against the spade slam West had what looked like a relatively normal lead of the heart king, which went to South’s ace. South could see that both minor-suit finesses rated to be wrong, but if he could bring in the diamonds for four tricks, he would have three homes for his potential club losers.

As the cards lie, the natural line of drawing all the trumps at once clearly fails. And if declarer draws a round or two of trump with the king and queen before playing the diamond ace then jack, West wins his king and leads a third diamond to allow East to ruff, killing a critical discard. Then West sits back and waits for his club winner.

At trick two, South found a significant improvement on these lines when he played the diamond jack without releasing the ace. West gave this a good look, and eventually ducked. Declarer now combined his chances to best effect by ducking a club. When West took his jack to play a heart, South ruffed, cashed the spade king and diamond ace, then played the club ace and ruffed a club.

Had the club king not put in an appearance, South would have needed to find the diamond king falling, with trumps 2-2, but as it was, he could simply draw trumps and claim the rest.


Your partner's second double shows extras and is aimed at takeout, not penalty. You are too good simply to bid three diamonds, so I would bid two spades (natural but suggesting only three spades as you would probably have responded one spade with four) to show you are not ashamed of your hand.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 6 4
 8 6 2
 Q 10 7 4 2
♣ 8 3
South West North East
Pass 1 Dbl. Pass
2 2 Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

I have never claimed to be an expert on anything except perhaps making the perfect omelet, and if you don't like spicy, you'd probably argue with me on that one, too.

Chris A. Jackson


East North
North-South ♠ K 8 6 2
 —
 A 9 7 5 2
♣ 8 7 4 3
West East
♠ J 10 7 5 4
 K 10 7 6 3
 3
♣ 10 9
♠ A Q 9
 J 9 8 2
 J 10 6 4
♣ K 2
South
♠ 3
 A Q 5 4
 K Q 8
♣ A Q J 6 5
South West North East
Pass
1♣ 1 Dbl. 3
3 NT 4 5♣ Pass
6♣ All pass    

3

It is well known that an expert will always play for a squeeze rather than a finesse. Here is Gunnar Hallberg, putting this theory into action.

After North’s negative double and five-club bid, Hallberg, took a shot at slam, which would have been easy on a heart lead. However, the defenders led a diamond to the 10 and king.

Hallberg won in hand, ruffed a heart, took a trump finesse, and ruffed another heart. Then he drew a second round of trump, cashed the diamond queen, and paused for reflection. If the spade ace was onside, simply leading up to the spade king would produce the 12th trick, and West’s decision to go to the four level might imply possession of the critical card. As against that, West appeared to be 5-5 in the majors, and there was therefore a strong argument to say that he would not have the spade ace, or he might have made a cue-bid to show both majors at his first turn. And he might not have led a singleton to trick one.

Hallberg came to the right conclusion when he took the heart ace, then ran all his trump, coming down to a three-card ending with a spade and the diamond A-9 in dummy, and a small spade, a heart and a diamond in hand.

East had been forced down to the bare spade ace to keep the diamonds guarded, and Gunnar triumphantly threw him in with a spade, to force a diamond lead into his diamond tenace, for the contract.


Despite your void in partner's suit and reasonable defense in spades, it feels right to make a negative double now. Yes, you will not be happy if your partner jumps in hearts, but the odds favor your having a decent place to play in one of the minors, and you can, you hope, rely on your partner not to go overboard just because he has six hearts.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ K 8 6 2
 —
 A 9 7 5 2
♣ 8 7 4 3
South West North East
1 1♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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