Aces on Bridge — Daily Columns

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, April 11th, 2014

In faith and hope the world will disagree,
But all mankind’s concern is charity.

Alexander Pope


South North
Both ♠ 9 8 6 5
 8 4 3
 10 9 2
♣ A Q 4
West East
♠ 7 2
 K 7
 K 8 7 6
♣ K J 9 8 5
♠ 10 4
 A J 10 6
 Q 5 4
♣ 10 6 3 2
South
♠ A K Q J 3
 Q 9 5 2
 A J 3
♣ 7
South West North East
1♠ 2♣ 2♠ 3♣
3 Pass 3♠ Pass
4♠ All pass    

♣8

Today's deal comes from the Arthur Loeb charity game, set up to provide funding for Lennox House in Manhattan by means of a pro-am event. At the table declarer followed the normal enough approach of going after diamonds, leaving herself with one diamond and three hearts to lose.

But how should you play four spades on the lead of the club eight? If the club finesse is wrong, then every other significant card is with West, and you are doomed. You need the club finesse and one diamond honor onside — so you will surely not find the hearts favorably located.

Curiously, you must take the practice finesse in clubs at trick one, then lead a low diamond to your jack. When West wins the trick, he can defeat the contract only by the unlikely shift to the heart king. In practice you will win the likely trump return in hand and cross to dummy’s trump nine to pass the diamond 10. Whether or not East covers, you will be able to win this diamond trick or the next in dummy, then lead the club ace while pitching a heart. Now you ruff the last club, strip off the diamonds if necessary, and exit with a low heart from hand.

With the hearts lying as they do, the defenders cannot unscramble their three winners in the suit. If West flies up with the king and exits in hearts, your queen is good. If West ducks, the heart blockage means West will eventually give you a ruff-sluff, and the heart loser goes away.


On this sort of auction, I would always rather give preference to partner with a call of two clubs than bid one no-trump. In my book, my partner does not have to introduce spades with a 4-3-3-3 pattern; he can instead rebid one no-trump. We might miss the best partscore, but the limiting rebid will help us reach the best game or slam. At pairs, though, I might be tempted to respond one no-trump.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 4
 A J 10 6
 Q 5 4
♣ 10 6 3 2
South West North East
Pass 1♣ Pass
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, April 10th, 2014

Only those who have patience to do simple things perfectly ever acquire the skill to do difficult things easily.

James J. Corbett


South North
East-West ♠ A Q 7 5 3
 K 2
 Q 6 5
♣ J 8 7
West East
♠ K 9 2
 A Q 6 4 3
 K 7 2
♣ 9 2
♠ 10 6 4
 8 7 5
 J 9 8
♣ 10 6 5 3
South
♠ J 8
 J 10 9
 A 10 4 3
♣ A K Q 4
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
2♠ Pass 3 NT All pass

4

Where you have eight tricks in three no-trump, there is usually a way to find a ninth. Today's deal was well-played by Nevena Senior in the round of 16 knockout match against Singapore in the World Mind Sports Games a few years ago. Cover up the East and West hands and give it a try yourself before reading on.

Not surprisingly, the heart four was led at both tables. The Singaporean declarer did not really make much of an attempt to make her game. She won the heart king, crossed to hand with a club, and led the spade jack. When West covered with the king, she ducked, but now the defenders were not hard-pressed to know what to do next.

By contrast, Senior won the heart lead in hand and immediately played the spade jack. When West covered with the king, she won dummy’s ace and ran her club winners. West discarded a diamond easily, but on the last club had to discard a spade. Nevena now cashed the spade queen and exited with a heart. West cashed her four heart tricks, but then had to lead a diamond and it was easy for Senior to guess the position.

In the same position the player sitting West for the U.S. produced a sparkling defensive resource. On the last club he discarded down to the bare diamond king. Now when declarer cashed the spade queen and threw him in with a heart, he had a spade winner to cash.


Although you have no more than two likely tricks on defense, you have a hand where the opponents should not be making overtricks, and you would certainly not expect five spades to have any chance to make. So double, expecting that this will end the auction.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A Q 7 5 3
 K 2
 Q 6 5
♣ J 8 7
South West North East
Pass Pass 1
1♠ 4 4♠ 5
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

You're a mouse studying to be a rat.

Wilson Mizner


South North
North-South ♠ 9 4
 7 2
 A Q 10 7
♣ A K Q 8 6
West East
♠ Q 7
 6 5
 6 5 3 2
♣ 9 7 5 3 2
♠ K 5 3
 A K Q 10 9 4
 9 8
♣ 10 4
South
♠ A J 10 8 6 2
 J 8 3
 K J 4
♣ J
South West North East
1♠ Pass 2♣ 2
2♠ Pass 3 Pass
3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass

6

Before falling prey to the knee-jerk reaction of taking your trump tricks when you can "before the rats get at them," stop to consider the implications.

At the table West naturally led a heart against four spades, and East cashed two of his top hearts, then continued with a third. West was quick to ruff in with the queen in front of dummy. Declarer took the diamond return on the table, and with dummy’s two trumps still intact, he was able to run the nine successfully. South continued by finessing the 10, and with the ace dropping East’s king on the third round of the suit, he was able to claim 10 tricks.

See the difference if West elects to discard on the third heart, rather than ruff. Declarer ruffs in dummy, yes, but the consequence of this is that dummy is now reduced to one trump. This means that only one trump finesse can be taken. Declarer duly takes it, and West wins with the queen and returns a diamond.

With no trumps left in dummy, and lacking the ability to reduce his trumps in hand sufficiently to effect a trump coup, South will continue with the spade ace, hoping that East had started with a doubleton spade king. But this eventuality will not come to pass, and declarer ends with just nine tricks, having to concede a second trump to the spade king.


There are some (not I) who would have opened this hand a strong no-trump. And equally, there are others who would now reverse into two diamonds at their second turn. I prefer to rebid clubs because I feel that a reverse — which would force club preference at the three-level — requires at least another working queen.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 9 4
 7 2
 A Q 10 7
♣ A K Q 8 6
South West North East
1♣ Pass 1♠ Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

The dwarf sees farther than the giant, when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge


North North
Both ♠ Q 10 4 3 2
 K 9 6
 2
♣ A K 8 6
West East
♠ A K 9
 J 10 7
 10 7 5 4
♣ J 5 2
♠ J 8 6 5
 4 3 2
 A K 8
♣ 9 4 3
South
♠ 7
 A Q 8 5
 Q J 9 6 3
♣ Q 10 7
South West North East
1♠ Pass
2 Pass 3♣ Pass
3 Pass 4 All pass

♠K

In every major tournament there is always at least one instance of David defeating Goliath. At the Olympiad in Beijing in 2008, the giant was Italy and they were beaten 16-14 by Albania, playing international bridge for the first time. This was one of Albania's triumphs.

The Italian South found himself in three no-trump, against which West led the unbid suit, hearts. Declarer won in hand with the queen and played a heart back to dummy’s nine. He now played a diamond. East went up with the ace and continued hearts. Declarer misjudged now when he ran the heart around to dummy’s king, and played a club to his 10. When this lost to West’s jack, South was doomed.

The Albanians bid to the delicate contract of four hearts. West led a top spade and switched to a club. Declarer won in dummy and played a diamond, and East won and continued clubs. Declarer won in dummy again and played a spade. The defenders won and played a third club. When no-one ruffed this, declarer had three clubs and crossruffed seven trump tricks to make his game.

Even a trump lead would not have hurt declarer. Suppose West leads a trump at trick one. Dummy wins, plays a diamond, and East plays another trump. Declarer wins in hand, ruffs a diamond, crosses to hand with the club queen, draws the last trump, and plays a top diamond. This establishes two more winners in the suit, allowing South to make five trumps, two diamonds and four clubs.


Your partner's double shows a maximum pass, and suggests a heart suit that is not good enough to bid, together with diamond tolerance. With four-card heart support, you should jump to three hearts, not so much because you think your side can make game but to take away bidding space from your opponents.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 7
 A Q 8 5
 Q J 9 6 3
♣ Q 10 7
South West North East
Pass 1♣
1 1♠ Dbl. Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Monday, April 7th, 2014

It's what you learn after you know it all that counts.

John Wooden


South North
Both ♠ J 7
 9 7
 A Q 10 9 6 4
♣ K Q 7
West East
♠ A 10 9 3 2
 K 10 8 5 2
 2
♣ 9 3
♠ 8 6 5
 J 6
 J 7 5 3
♣ 10 8 6 5
South
♠ K Q 4
 A Q 4 3
 K 8
♣ A J 4 2
South West North East
1♣ 2♣* 2♠** Pass
3 Pass 4♣ Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
6 NT All pass    

*Spades and hearts

**Diamonds, GF

♠A

The swing that arose in today's deal resulted from one team's aggression in both rooms. At one table South opened two no-trump with very little excuse, and North bounced to six diamonds. East closed his eyes and guessed to lead a spade, giving declarer a discard for his heart loser. But when he played the trump suit in normal fashion, he had to go down a trick.

In the other room West stretched to show his two-suiter, and got his opponents to slam the correct way up. Worse was to follow from his perspective since he had a horrible lead problem. It is rarely correct to lead an ace against six no-trump. But eventually West started with ace and another spade, which turned out to do no serious harm, declarer winning in hand as East gave count.

West’s two-suited bid had given declarer a very good idea of his general shape. He knew 10 of that player’s cards, but what was his minor-suit pattern? Declarer set out to find out more, cashing two rounds of clubs ending in dummy. When West followed suit, declarer knew 12 of West’s 13 cards, and it was now a 4-1 shot that he had a singleton small diamond rather than the bare jack. Accordingly, declarer ran the diamond 10 next. When it held, he unblocked the diamonds, crossed to the club king, and ran the diamond suit. He took tricks 12 and 13 with his heart and club winners.


With the cards apparently lying badly for declarer, you might elect to go passive here with a club lead. I am not convinced about this. My instincts are to try to set up or cash diamond winners for our side before they go away on the clubs, one way or another.

LEAD WITH THE ACES

♠ K 7
 Q 10 3
 K 9 6 4
♣ 10 9 6 4
South West North East
1♠
Pass 1 NT Pass 3
Pass 3♠ Pass 3 NT
All pass      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Sunday, April 6th, 2014

My partner has suggested I play revolving discards (where a high card in one suit calls for the suit above, a low one for the suit below). Do you think that this system is compatible with suit-preference signals as played in the normal fashion?

Busy Lizzy, Rockford, Ill.

Your signaling method and your discarding method are not necessarily mutually exclusive — they do not have to be the same. I'm happy to play any system of discarding where I can call for one suit by discarding in one of the other suits; I find I throw fewer winners away as a consequence of that.

I was fourth to speak with ♠ Q,  J-3,  A-J-9-5-3-2, ♣ A-K-10-2, and opened one diamond. After partner responded one no-trump, it did not feel right to pass. But I felt I had too many choices, with bids at various levels in either minor. Even the possibility of raising no-trump did not seem outlandish.

Pick Six, Wausau, Wis.

Passing certainly does not seem right — the hand has potential for game in either minor, but even one one no-trump might go down on a bad day! I'd recommend a simple call of two clubs, intending to rebid three diamonds whether partner reverts to two diamonds, or raises to three clubs. Both sequences would sound like 6-4 in the minors with extra values.

I teach bridge, and I tell my students to respond in their longest suit if they can afford it. In your column you told players to respond one spade with the following hand if their partner opened one diamond: ♠ K-8-6-5,  Q-4,  K-5, ♣ K-9-6-5-4. If you are not playing two-over-one, I feel you can afford a two-club response, and whatever partner bids next, you should have no problems. What are your thoughts?

Lumberjack, Spokane, Wash.

You make a fair point. I think with one-bid hands you should bid a major if you can. What you do on game-forcing hands is normally to bid the long suits. It is with the in-between hands where you have to make a judgment call. If the major is weak, you might opt to introduce a longer minor first.

Why do you prefer the lead of the king from king-queen as well as from the ace-king? Does it not create some ambiguity when you have certain holdings that include the jack?

Justice League, San Antonio, Texas

I am someone who leads his fair share of unsupported aces and wants to know what partner's attitude is when he knows the king is missing. I admit that when you hold jack-third in response to a king lead and dummy has a relatively short holding without the queen or ace, you might not know how to signal. I will take that downside in exchange for more clarity elsewhere.

Say your LHO opened one diamond, and partner made a three-club overcall. What would you bid after your RHO made a negative double and you held ♠ 10-5,  A-Q-9-4-3,  10-6-5, ♣ Q-4-3? The deal comes from a matchpoint pair event with your side at favorable vulnerability and with a cheap save in five clubs over four spades.

Nosey Parker, Spartanburg, S.C.

I would not bounce to five clubs immediately, but I would not necessarily recommend my solution to you until you had discussed this with your partner. I'd suggest that you bid three hearts, with the understanding that a new suit in response to a pre-emptive overcall is fit-showing in competition. It shows a hand with club tolerance or better and a desire for a heart lead. That should help partner decide whether to save and what to lead.


For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Saturday, April 5th, 2014

There are men in the world who derive as stern an exaltation from the proximity of disaster and ruin, as others from success.

Winston Churchill


South North
East-West ♠ A 7 3
 A Q 7 4
 6 3 2
♣ 10 9 2
West East
♠ Q J 10 8
 6 3
 A Q 8
♣ 8 6 4 3
♠ 9 6 5 4
 5
 J 10 9 5
♣ K Q 7 5
South
♠ K 2
 K J 10 9 8 2
 K 7 4
♣ A J
South West North East
1 Pass 3 Pass
4 All pass    

♠Q

Today's deal demonstrates that one should always go for that slim extra chance. You never know when the card gods are going to reward you for digging around to find a way to overcome a bad break, or an unfriendly lie of the cards.

When you declare four hearts, the spade queen is led to the first trick. It seems that you must rely on the diamond ace being onside. Can you do better, though?

There is indeed an extra chance when the diamond ace is wrong, and this is that East holds either the club king-queen or a doubleton club honor. To prevent East from gaining the lead when he has both club honors, you must duck the opening lead in both hands — a strange-looking play but one that can hardly cost since you have plenty of other losers to discard on the spade winner. After winning the next spade in hand, cross to dummy by leading the heart jack to the queen, then playing the club two, intending to insert the jack.

East must therefore split his honors, and you take East’s queen with the ace, play the heart two to dummy’s seven, then throw the club jack on the spade ace and lead the club 10. After ruffing away East’s king with your trump king, play the heart two to dummy’s seven. You can now throw a diamond on the good club nine, and can even lead a diamond to the king in the search for the overtrick.


Stayman or a simple raise to three no-trump? The balanced shape argues against looking for a major-suit fit, and in the process giving away your shape to the opposition. In favor of investigation are the three small cards in two suits, either of which could be a fatal weakness at no-trump. Put me down for Stayman, but it is a close call. If you made the diamond six the jack, I might go the other way.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A 7 3
 A Q 7 4
 6 3 2
♣ 10 9 2
South West North East
1 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Friday, April 4th, 2014

Put none but Americans on guard tonight.

George Washington


South North
East-West ♠ A K J 7 4 3
 5 4 3
 8 6
♣ 10 4
West East
♠ Q 2
 Q 10 9 6 2
 Q 10
♣ K 8 7 6
♠ 10 9 8 6
 8
 K J 9 3
♣ J 9 5 3
South
♠ 5
 A K J 7
 A 7 5 4 2
♣ A Q 2
South West North East
1 Pass 1♠ Pass
2 Pass 3♠ Pass
3 NT All pass    

♣6

This deal is from the final of the 1980 Australian National Open Teams. Which game contract do you think North-South should have reached? In my opinion one could argue that once North bid three spades over two hearts at his second turn to promise a good suit, maybe South should have considered raising to four spades.

Note that even with the bad break in spades, and the club and heart finesses failing, declarer should be able to find a way to bring home 10 tricks in spades by setting up the diamonds, or by ducking an initial club lead.

As it was, South declared three no-trump, and the club six was led to the 10, jack and queen. Declarer appreciated that the spades could wait. He ducked a diamond, and East overtook the diamond 10 with the jack to return a second club. West took the trick and cleared the clubs. Now South led another low diamond. West took the queen and played a fourth club, won by East’s nine.

At this point it looks easy to exit with a heart. But look what happens: declarer will cash the ace and king of hearts and catch East in a squeeze. Whether he discards a spade or a diamond, declarer will take the rest. Appreciating that, East found the shift to a spade into dummy’s tenace, cutting declarer’s communications and insuring a diamond trick for himself or a heart for his partner in the ending.


The response of two no-trump to a weak two-bid is a relay guaranteeing at least game-invitational values. So opener must drive to game, whatever your scheme of responses. Assuming you would rebid a feature if you had one, you must choose between a call of three no-trump, implying solid or semisolid spades, or a jump to four spades. I prefer the former action, since I have no side-suit shortage.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ A K J 7 4 3
 5 4 3
 8 6
♣ 10 4
South West North East
2♠ Pass 2 NT Pass
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

There are times to stay put, and what you want will come to you, and there are times to go out into the world and find such a thing for yourself.

Lemony Snicket


South North
Both ♠ 8 5 2
 K 6 5
 10 5 4
♣ A K J 2
West East
♠ K Q 10 9 3
 9 3
 A Q 3
♣ 9 7 5
♠ A J 6 4
 10 4 2
 J 8 6 2
♣ 8 6
South
♠ 7
 A Q J 8 7
 K 9 7
♣ Q 10 4 3
South West North East
1 1♠ 2♣ 3♠
4♣ Pass 4 All pass

♠K

The contract of four hearts has nine top winners, but the 10th trick is harder to find. The defenders have to steer clear of leading diamonds, but a normal line of defense will see West's spade-king lead going to the ace. The spade four is ruffed; now how should declarer advance?

The first key-play is to cash the heart ace and lead a heart to the king. Now, as declarer expects West to have the bulk of the defenders’ high cards and East has turned up with the spade ace, he should assume the diamond ace is offside. Since South needs a diamond trick for his contract, he must assume West does not have two out of the diamond queen, jack and eight.

South leads the diamond 10 from dummy (maybe East will forget to cover from honor-third or honor-fourth?), planning to let it run, but covering East’s honor if necessary. After the jack, king and ace have been played, a third spade comes back. South ruffs, crosses to the dummy with a club, and leads a diamond. He must guess whether to put in the seven or nine.

Say he gets it right and puts in the seven, forcing the queen. No lead can hurt South now, since dummy still has a small trump left on a spade return. Declarer makes five hearts, four clubs and a diamond for 10 tricks.


This is the same auction as in our featured deal, except that South is a passed hand. The choice is a two-spade cue-bid raise, or a fit-jump to three clubs, for which you would really need either a fifth club or a fourth heart. Without the club jack, a simple raise to two hearts would suffice.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 8 5 2
 K 6 5
 10 5 4
♣ A K J 2
South West North East
Pass Pass 1 1♠
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

The Aces on Bridge: Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing.

Duke Ellington


East North
Both ♠ A Q 6 5 3 2
 J 8 3
 7 6 3
♣ 7
West East
♠ K 4
 Q 10 9 6 2
 Q 9 8
♣ A 5 3
♠ 10 9 8
 —
 A J 10 2
♣ K Q 10 9 8 6
South
♠ J 7
 A K 7 5 4
 K 5 4
♣ J 4 2
South West North East
1♣
1 Pass 1♠ 2♣
Pass 2 NT 3 Pass
Pass Dbl. All pass  

♣A

Although this was a flat board from the 2009 European championship, it was certainly not dull.

In our featured room North should surely have heeded the warning signs of West’s sequence of bids, which surely suggested fair values with a heart stack. But in three hearts doubled, neither the play nor the defense was sparkling. West led the club ace and switched to a diamond to East’s ace. Declarer won the diamond return and played the spade jack to the king and ace. He now cashed the spade queen and ruffed a spade with the seven. West overruffed and declarer had to go two down, for minus 500.

Declarer should have ruffed the third spade high. Say West discards a club; now declarer ruffs a club and plays a winning spade, discarding his last diamond. West can trump, and play a diamond, but declarer ruffs and plays his last club to escape for one down.

In the other room the English defended two hearts doubled, and David Gold showed how the hand should be defended. He led a trump at trick one, and declarer won with the four in his hand (a rare event!) and played the club jack. West carefully went up with the ace and switched to the heart queen, his third good play. This was the only sequence of plays to ensure the defeat of two hearts, though in practice when declarer lost his way, he managed to go two down. No swing!


Facing a passed partner I would jump to three clubs to make my opponents' task of finding a fit more difficult. Somebody has quite a lot of hearts, and since my partner has already passed, I'm guessing it is West. Whether he will be happy to find a heart contract is more difficult to predict.

BID WITH THE ACES

♠ 10 9 8
 —
 A J 10 2
♣ K Q 10 9 8 6
South West North East
Pass 1
?      

For details of Bobby Wolff’s autobiography, The Lone Wolff, contact theLoneWolff@bridgeblogging.com. If you would like to contact Bobby Wolff, please leave a comment at this blog. Reproduced with permission of United Feature Syndicate, Inc., Copyright 2014. If you are interested in reprinting The Aces on Bridge column, contact reprints@unitedmedia.com.

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